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Deux siècles à l'opéra, 1669-1868: chronique anecdotique, artistique, excentriqae, pittoresque et gal - Découvrez le Sequoia National Park | Office du tourisme.



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He is sometimes said to be a French variant of the sixteenth-century Italian Pedrolino , [5] but the two types have little but their names ("Little Pete") and social stations in common. [6] Both are comic servants, but Pedrolino, as a so-called first zanni , often acts with cunning and daring, [7] an engine of the plot in the scenarios where he appears. [8] Pierrot, on the other hand, as a "second" zanni , is a static character in his earliest incarnations, "standing on the periphery of the action", [9] dispensing advice that seems to him sage, and courting—unsuccessfully—his master's young daughter, Columbine, with bashfulness and indecision. [10]

An Italian company was called back to Paris in 1716, and Pierrot was reincarnated by the actors Pierre-François Biancolelli (son of the Harlequin of the banished troupe of players) and, after Biancolelli abandoned the role, the celebrated Fabio Sticotti (1676–1741) and his son Antoine Jean (1715–1772). [19] But the character seems to have been regarded as unimportant by this company, since he appears infrequently in its new plays. [20]

The broad satirical streak in Lesage often rendered him indifferent to Pierrot's character, and consequently, as the critic Vincent Barberet observes, "Pierrot is assigned the most diverse roles . . and sometimes the most opposed to his personality. Besides making him a valet, a roasting specialist, a chef, a hash-house cook, an adventurer, [Lesage] just as frequently dresses him up as someone else." In not a few of the early Foire plays, Pierrot's character is therefore "quite badly defined." [24] (For a typical farce by Lesage during these years, see his Harlequin, King of Serendib of 1713.) In the main, Pierrot's inaugural years at the Foires were rather degenerate ones.


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