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The body bears the burden: trauma, dissociation, and disease - The Body Bears the Burden: Trauma, Dissociation, and.



The word koala comes from the Dharug gula . Although the vowel 'u' was originally written in the English orthography as "oo" (in spellings such as coola or koolah ), it was changed to "oa", possibly in error. [5] Because of the koala's supposed resemblance to a bear , it was often miscalled the koala bear, particularly by early settlers. [6] The generic name, Phascolarctos , is derived from the Greek words phaskolos "pouch" and arktos "bear". The specific name , cinereus , is Latin for "ash coloured". [7]

The koala is classified with wombats (family Vombatidae) and several extinct families (including marsupial tapirs , marsupial lions and giant wombats ) in the suborder Vombatiformes within the order Diprotodontia . [11] The Vombatiformes are a sister group to a clade that includes macropods ( kangaroos and wallabies ) and possums . [12] The ancestors of vombatiforms were likely arboreal , [8] and the koala's lineage was possibly the first to branch off around 40 million years ago during the Eocene . [13]

In Queensland, koalas are unevenly distributed and uncommon except in the southeast, where they are numerous. In New South Wales, they are abundant only in Pilliga , while in Victoria they are common nearly everywhere. In South Australia, koalas were extirpated by 1920 and subsequently reintroduced. [1] Koalas can be found in habitats ranging from relatively open forests to woodlands , and in climates ranging from tropical to cool temperate . [29] In semi-arid climates , they prefer riparian habitats , where nearby streams and creeks provide refuge during times of drought and extreme heat. [51]

Robert Scaer , MD, has practiced neurology and rehabilitation for 36 years. His three books, The Body Bears the Burden , The Trauma Spectrum , and 8 Keys to Brain–Body Balance, address the intimate relationship between life trauma and chronic disease, the ubiquitous association of modern society with intrinsic sources of trauma, and the role of somatic techniques for healing trauma.

When The Body Bears the Burden made its debut in 2001, it changed the way people thought about trauma, PTSD, and the treatment of chronic stress disorders. Now in its third edition, this revered text offers a fully updated and revised analysis of the relationship between mind, body, and the processing of trauma. Here, clinicians will find detailed, thorough explorations of some of neurobiology’s fundamental tenets, the connections between mind, brain, and body, and the many and varied ways that symptoms of traumatic stress become visible to those who know to look for them.

"In this groundbreaking integration of neurology, psychology, and evolutionary biology, Dr. Scaer sheds new light on the dynamics of psychological trauma and provides a way to understand and effectively treat its often misunderstood, intractable effects on the mind and body. This book is a must read for medical and mental-health professionals working with patients struggling with everything from anxiety and PTSD to chronic pain, gastrointestinal distress, and a host of other difficult-to-treat medical disorders."

The word koala comes from the Dharug gula . Although the vowel 'u' was originally written in the English orthography as "oo" (in spellings such as coola or koolah ), it was changed to "oa", possibly in error. [5] Because of the koala's supposed resemblance to a bear , it was often miscalled the koala bear, particularly by early settlers. [6] The generic name, Phascolarctos , is derived from the Greek words phaskolos "pouch" and arktos "bear". The specific name , cinereus , is Latin for "ash coloured". [7]

The koala is classified with wombats (family Vombatidae) and several extinct families (including marsupial tapirs , marsupial lions and giant wombats ) in the suborder Vombatiformes within the order Diprotodontia . [11] The Vombatiformes are a sister group to a clade that includes macropods ( kangaroos and wallabies ) and possums . [12] The ancestors of vombatiforms were likely arboreal , [8] and the koala's lineage was possibly the first to branch off around 40 million years ago during the Eocene . [13]

In Queensland, koalas are unevenly distributed and uncommon except in the southeast, where they are numerous. In New South Wales, they are abundant only in Pilliga , while in Victoria they are common nearly everywhere. In South Australia, koalas were extirpated by 1920 and subsequently reintroduced. [1] Koalas can be found in habitats ranging from relatively open forests to woodlands , and in climates ranging from tropical to cool temperate . [29] In semi-arid climates , they prefer riparian habitats , where nearby streams and creeks provide refuge during times of drought and extreme heat. [51]

Robert Scaer , MD, has practiced neurology and rehabilitation for 36 years. His three books, The Body Bears the Burden , The Trauma Spectrum , and 8 Keys to Brain–Body Balance, address the intimate relationship between life trauma and chronic disease, the ubiquitous association of modern society with intrinsic sources of trauma, and the role of somatic techniques for healing trauma.

When The Body Bears the Burden made its debut in 2001, it changed the way people thought about trauma, PTSD, and the treatment of chronic stress disorders. Now in its third edition, this revered text offers a fully updated and revised analysis of the relationship between mind, body, and the processing of trauma. Here, clinicians will find detailed, thorough explorations of some of neurobiology’s fundamental tenets, the connections between mind, brain, and body, and the many and varied ways that symptoms of traumatic stress become visible to those who know to look for them.

"In this groundbreaking integration of neurology, psychology, and evolutionary biology, Dr. Scaer sheds new light on the dynamics of psychological trauma and provides a way to understand and effectively treat its often misunderstood, intractable effects on the mind and body. This book is a must read for medical and mental-health professionals working with patients struggling with everything from anxiety and PTSD to chronic pain, gastrointestinal distress, and a host of other difficult-to-treat medical disorders."

New edition provides updated concepts and ideas in simplified medical language The Body Bears the Burden: Trauma, Dissociation, and Disease, Second Edition is the ...

The Body Bears the Burden: Trauma, Dissociation, and Disease: 9780415641524: Medicine & Health Science Books @ Amazon.com

The peoples of eastern Asia use bears ' body parts and secretions (notably their gallbladders and bile) as part of traditional Chinese medicine.

The word koala comes from the Dharug gula . Although the vowel 'u' was originally written in the English orthography as "oo" (in spellings such as coola or koolah ), it was changed to "oa", possibly in error. [5] Because of the koala's supposed resemblance to a bear , it was often miscalled the koala bear, particularly by early settlers. [6] The generic name, Phascolarctos , is derived from the Greek words phaskolos "pouch" and arktos "bear". The specific name , cinereus , is Latin for "ash coloured". [7]

The koala is classified with wombats (family Vombatidae) and several extinct families (including marsupial tapirs , marsupial lions and giant wombats ) in the suborder Vombatiformes within the order Diprotodontia . [11] The Vombatiformes are a sister group to a clade that includes macropods ( kangaroos and wallabies ) and possums . [12] The ancestors of vombatiforms were likely arboreal , [8] and the koala's lineage was possibly the first to branch off around 40 million years ago during the Eocene . [13]

In Queensland, koalas are unevenly distributed and uncommon except in the southeast, where they are numerous. In New South Wales, they are abundant only in Pilliga , while in Victoria they are common nearly everywhere. In South Australia, koalas were extirpated by 1920 and subsequently reintroduced. [1] Koalas can be found in habitats ranging from relatively open forests to woodlands , and in climates ranging from tropical to cool temperate . [29] In semi-arid climates , they prefer riparian habitats , where nearby streams and creeks provide refuge during times of drought and extreme heat. [51]


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