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Ruins in italy (the keeper book 2) -



The ruins of Rome's ancient seaport are like Pompeii without the crowds—and just a 14-mile subway ride west of downtown.

Abandoned when the empire fell—after which the gradual silting of the harbor moved the coastline out 4km and the ruins were plundered for their marble to build the cathedrals in Pisa , Florence , and Orvieto—this ancient ghost town has been only partly excavated, giving Ostia an aura of Romantic decay missing from most dusty, tourist-ridden archaeological sites.

Scraps of fresco cling to the walls of private villas and columns guard roofless temples and their crumbling floor mosaics. Armless statues hide amid the tall grasses, millstones stand ready to grind in the back rooms of long-dead bakeries, and wildflowers speckle the stone seats of the ancient theater.

The glories of ancient Rome are easily accessible to the visitor. Some sites can be visited for free while others are part of Rome Passes and Cards . Most ancient sites are in Rome's historic center so you can visit several places in one day. Even if you don't have time to take an in-depth look, just walking by some of these places is incredible and gives you an overview of ancient Rome's history.

Ancient Rome's huge amphitheater, holding up to 55,000 people, was built by Emperor Vespasian in AD 80 and was the scene of many deadly gladiatorial and wild animal fights. Today you may see men dressed in gladiatorial costume as you walk between the Colosseum and the nearby Arch of Constantine, built in AD 315. On Sundays, the Via dei Fori Imperiali leading to the Colosseum is closed to traffic so it's a great place for a stroll (if you don't mind the souvenir vendors).

Ticket lines can be long but there are several ways to buy Colosseum tickets faster including buying a Colosseum and Roman Forum pass online from Select Italy .

It may lack the Botticellis, Guccis, and touristic icons of Venice, Florence, or Rome, but Sicily still packs a punch. This island — a little smaller than Massachusetts — is home to some of Europe’s most important ancient Greek sites, the most active volcano in Europe, and some of Italy’s most intriguing architecture and tastiest food.

While part of Italy, Sicily really is a world apart. Midway between Africa and Europe in the middle of the Mediterranean, over the last 2,500 years it’s been ruled by Greeks, Romans, Arabs, Normans, and Spaniards. Its complicated past makes it distinct — with spicier food, a more festive lifestyle, and people who are Sicilian first, Italian second. Italian Americans have a special bond with the island — almost one-third of all Italians who arrived in the U.S. between 1880 and 1930 were from Sicily.

This past spring, I found Sicily had changed quite a bit since my last visit. Years ago I considered Palermo, the capital city, seedy and sketchy. My latest visit demolished my lingering Mafia images. The city is still gritty and colorful, yet its bustling center feels safe and trendy.

Trieste ( / t r iː ˈ ɛ s t / ; [2] Italian pronunciation:  [triˈɛste]   listen   ( help · info ) ; Slovene : Trst ) is a city and a seaport in northeastern Italy . It is situated towards the end of a narrow strip of Italian territory lying between the Adriatic Sea and Slovenia , which lies almost immediately south and east of the city. It is also located near Croatia some further 30 kilometres (19 mi) south.

Trieste is located at the head of the Gulf of Trieste and throughout history it has been influenced by its location at the crossroads of Latin , Slavic , and Germanic cultures. In 2009, it had a population of about 205,000 [1] and it is the capital of the autonomous region Friuli-Venezia Giulia . The metropolitan population of Trieste is 410000, with the city comprising about 230000 inhabitants.

Today, Trieste province is one of the richest in Italy, and it is a great centre for shipping (through the Port of Trieste ), shipbuilding and financial services. Trieste is the most important port of Italy and it will be the 2020 European Capital of Science - ESOF.

The ruins of Rome's ancient seaport are like Pompeii without the crowds—and just a 14-mile subway ride west of downtown.

Abandoned when the empire fell—after which the gradual silting of the harbor moved the coastline out 4km and the ruins were plundered for their marble to build the cathedrals in Pisa , Florence , and Orvieto—this ancient ghost town has been only partly excavated, giving Ostia an aura of Romantic decay missing from most dusty, tourist-ridden archaeological sites.

Scraps of fresco cling to the walls of private villas and columns guard roofless temples and their crumbling floor mosaics. Armless statues hide amid the tall grasses, millstones stand ready to grind in the back rooms of long-dead bakeries, and wildflowers speckle the stone seats of the ancient theater.

The glories of ancient Rome are easily accessible to the visitor. Some sites can be visited for free while others are part of Rome Passes and Cards . Most ancient sites are in Rome's historic center so you can visit several places in one day. Even if you don't have time to take an in-depth look, just walking by some of these places is incredible and gives you an overview of ancient Rome's history.

Ancient Rome's huge amphitheater, holding up to 55,000 people, was built by Emperor Vespasian in AD 80 and was the scene of many deadly gladiatorial and wild animal fights. Today you may see men dressed in gladiatorial costume as you walk between the Colosseum and the nearby Arch of Constantine, built in AD 315. On Sundays, the Via dei Fori Imperiali leading to the Colosseum is closed to traffic so it's a great place for a stroll (if you don't mind the souvenir vendors).

Ticket lines can be long but there are several ways to buy Colosseum tickets faster including buying a Colosseum and Roman Forum pass online from Select Italy .

It may lack the Botticellis, Guccis, and touristic icons of Venice, Florence, or Rome, but Sicily still packs a punch. This island — a little smaller than Massachusetts — is home to some of Europe’s most important ancient Greek sites, the most active volcano in Europe, and some of Italy’s most intriguing architecture and tastiest food.

While part of Italy, Sicily really is a world apart. Midway between Africa and Europe in the middle of the Mediterranean, over the last 2,500 years it’s been ruled by Greeks, Romans, Arabs, Normans, and Spaniards. Its complicated past makes it distinct — with spicier food, a more festive lifestyle, and people who are Sicilian first, Italian second. Italian Americans have a special bond with the island — almost one-third of all Italians who arrived in the U.S. between 1880 and 1930 were from Sicily.

This past spring, I found Sicily had changed quite a bit since my last visit. Years ago I considered Palermo, the capital city, seedy and sketchy. My latest visit demolished my lingering Mafia images. The city is still gritty and colorful, yet its bustling center feels safe and trendy.

The ruins of Rome's ancient seaport are like Pompeii without the crowds—and just a 14-mile subway ride west of downtown.

Abandoned when the empire fell—after which the gradual silting of the harbor moved the coastline out 4km and the ruins were plundered for their marble to build the cathedrals in Pisa , Florence , and Orvieto—this ancient ghost town has been only partly excavated, giving Ostia an aura of Romantic decay missing from most dusty, tourist-ridden archaeological sites.

Scraps of fresco cling to the walls of private villas and columns guard roofless temples and their crumbling floor mosaics. Armless statues hide amid the tall grasses, millstones stand ready to grind in the back rooms of long-dead bakeries, and wildflowers speckle the stone seats of the ancient theater.

The glories of ancient Rome are easily accessible to the visitor. Some sites can be visited for free while others are part of Rome Passes and Cards . Most ancient sites are in Rome's historic center so you can visit several places in one day. Even if you don't have time to take an in-depth look, just walking by some of these places is incredible and gives you an overview of ancient Rome's history.

Ancient Rome's huge amphitheater, holding up to 55,000 people, was built by Emperor Vespasian in AD 80 and was the scene of many deadly gladiatorial and wild animal fights. Today you may see men dressed in gladiatorial costume as you walk between the Colosseum and the nearby Arch of Constantine, built in AD 315. On Sundays, the Via dei Fori Imperiali leading to the Colosseum is closed to traffic so it's a great place for a stroll (if you don't mind the souvenir vendors).

Ticket lines can be long but there are several ways to buy Colosseum tickets faster including buying a Colosseum and Roman Forum pass online from Select Italy .

The ruins of Rome's ancient seaport are like Pompeii without the crowds—and just a 14-mile subway ride west of downtown.

Abandoned when the empire fell—after which the gradual silting of the harbor moved the coastline out 4km and the ruins were plundered for their marble to build the cathedrals in Pisa , Florence , and Orvieto—this ancient ghost town has been only partly excavated, giving Ostia an aura of Romantic decay missing from most dusty, tourist-ridden archaeological sites.

Scraps of fresco cling to the walls of private villas and columns guard roofless temples and their crumbling floor mosaics. Armless statues hide amid the tall grasses, millstones stand ready to grind in the back rooms of long-dead bakeries, and wildflowers speckle the stone seats of the ancient theater.


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