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Myths and legends of the celtic race - Myths & Legends | Ancient Origins



The Arachne is a creature from Greek mythology, whose name was later used for words like “arachnid” and “arachnophobia.” There’s very little to fear about the story of Arachne, however. Hers is a cautionary tale about pride that we can all learn from. According to the myth, Arachne was a very famous and talented weaver. […]

In Greek mythology, Centaurs (or Kentauroi) are half-man, half horse creatures that inhabited the mountains and forests of Thessaly. Centaurs were said to be primal, existing in tribes and making their homes in caves, hunting wild animals and arming themselves with rocks and tree branches.

Cerberus: The three Headed Dog of Greek Mythology There are many unique creatures mentioned in Greek mythology. One of the most well known may be the three-headed dog known as Cerberus. It was the job of Cerberus to guard the entrance to Hades. In Greek mythology, this was the underworld where spirits of the dead […]

Storynory Ltd, 26 Star Street, London UK. +44 (0) 7941 190 740. Main point of contact - [email protected] Audio and texts are Copyright Storynory Ltd unless otherwise stated. Images are copyrighted to their owners. Many images on this site are licenced from Shutterstock.

Our Terms and Conditions make it easy for schools to use our materials for free, please see our Copywrite Page for details

The Arachne is a creature from Greek mythology, whose name was later used for words like “arachnid” and “arachnophobia.” There’s very little to fear about the story of Arachne, however. Hers is a cautionary tale about pride that we can all learn from. According to the myth, Arachne was a very famous and talented weaver. […]

In Greek mythology, Centaurs (or Kentauroi) are half-man, half horse creatures that inhabited the mountains and forests of Thessaly. Centaurs were said to be primal, existing in tribes and making their homes in caves, hunting wild animals and arming themselves with rocks and tree branches.

Cerberus: The three Headed Dog of Greek Mythology There are many unique creatures mentioned in Greek mythology. One of the most well known may be the three-headed dog known as Cerberus. It was the job of Cerberus to guard the entrance to Hades. In Greek mythology, this was the underworld where spirits of the dead […]

Storynory Ltd, 26 Star Street, London UK. +44 (0) 7941 190 740. Main point of contact - [email protected] Audio and texts are Copyright Storynory Ltd unless otherwise stated. Images are copyrighted to their owners. Many images on this site are licenced from Shutterstock.

Our Terms and Conditions make it easy for schools to use our materials for free, please see our Copywrite Page for details

A giant otherworldly monster that shoots fire from its mouth. The treacherous chief that killed his father. A super-smart fish dinner. We wrap up this chapter of the legend of Finn MacCool

No matter where you’re from, you probably have your fair share of wild myths. From stuff like the legend of King Arthur and his magic BFF to the mischievous gods of Ancient Greece to the insane epics of Hindu mythology, just about every culture comes with a set of stories that most other cultures call foreign or strange.

But then there are the universal myths—myths that crop up repeatedly in cultures separated by hundreds of miles and thousands of years. These myths are so near-universal that their prevalence is downright spooky.


The idea of a flood that drowns the entire world pops up in almost every single culture. Jews and Christians know it as the story of Noah, but other versions almost certainly predate the Genesis account. The Ancient Sumerian Epic of Gilgamesh includes the tale of Utnapishtim , who builds a boat, fills it with animals to escape a deluge, and eventually comes to rest on a mountaintop. The Greeks had Deucalion, who survived a flood sent by Zeus. Other versions appear in Hindu, Mayan, and Native American legends.

The Arachne is a creature from Greek mythology, whose name was later used for words like “arachnid” and “arachnophobia.” There’s very little to fear about the story of Arachne, however. Hers is a cautionary tale about pride that we can all learn from. According to the myth, Arachne was a very famous and talented weaver. […]

In Greek mythology, Centaurs (or Kentauroi) are half-man, half horse creatures that inhabited the mountains and forests of Thessaly. Centaurs were said to be primal, existing in tribes and making their homes in caves, hunting wild animals and arming themselves with rocks and tree branches.

Cerberus: The three Headed Dog of Greek Mythology There are many unique creatures mentioned in Greek mythology. One of the most well known may be the three-headed dog known as Cerberus. It was the job of Cerberus to guard the entrance to Hades. In Greek mythology, this was the underworld where spirits of the dead […]

The Arachne is a creature from Greek mythology, whose name was later used for words like “arachnid” and “arachnophobia.” There’s very little to fear about the story of Arachne, however. Hers is a cautionary tale about pride that we can all learn from. According to the myth, Arachne was a very famous and talented weaver. […]

In Greek mythology, Centaurs (or Kentauroi) are half-man, half horse creatures that inhabited the mountains and forests of Thessaly. Centaurs were said to be primal, existing in tribes and making their homes in caves, hunting wild animals and arming themselves with rocks and tree branches.

Cerberus: The three Headed Dog of Greek Mythology There are many unique creatures mentioned in Greek mythology. One of the most well known may be the three-headed dog known as Cerberus. It was the job of Cerberus to guard the entrance to Hades. In Greek mythology, this was the underworld where spirits of the dead […]

Storynory Ltd, 26 Star Street, London UK. +44 (0) 7941 190 740. Main point of contact - [email protected] Audio and texts are Copyright Storynory Ltd unless otherwise stated. Images are copyrighted to their owners. Many images on this site are licenced from Shutterstock.

Our Terms and Conditions make it easy for schools to use our materials for free, please see our Copywrite Page for details

A giant otherworldly monster that shoots fire from its mouth. The treacherous chief that killed his father. A super-smart fish dinner. We wrap up this chapter of the legend of Finn MacCool

No matter where you’re from, you probably have your fair share of wild myths. From stuff like the legend of King Arthur and his magic BFF to the mischievous gods of Ancient Greece to the insane epics of Hindu mythology, just about every culture comes with a set of stories that most other cultures call foreign or strange.

But then there are the universal myths—myths that crop up repeatedly in cultures separated by hundreds of miles and thousands of years. These myths are so near-universal that their prevalence is downright spooky.


The idea of a flood that drowns the entire world pops up in almost every single culture. Jews and Christians know it as the story of Noah, but other versions almost certainly predate the Genesis account. The Ancient Sumerian Epic of Gilgamesh includes the tale of Utnapishtim , who builds a boat, fills it with animals to escape a deluge, and eventually comes to rest on a mountaintop. The Greeks had Deucalion, who survived a flood sent by Zeus. Other versions appear in Hindu, Mayan, and Native American legends.

The terms "myth," "folklore," "legend," and "fairy tale" are often used interchangeably, leading to the misconception that they mean the same thing: fanciful tales. While it's true that these terms may refer to bodies of writing that answer some of life's basic questions, each presents a unique reader experience. They've all stood the test of time, which speaks volumes about their ongoing hold on our imaginations.

A myth is a traditional story that may answer life's overarching questions, such as the origins of the world or of a people. A myth can also be an attempt to explain mysteries, supernatural events, and cultural traditions. Sometimes sacred in nature, a myth can involve gods or other creatures. And a myth presents reality in dramatic ways.

Many cultures have their own versions of common myths, which contain archetypal images and themes. Myth criticism is used to analyze these threads in literature. A prominent name in myth criticism is Northrop Frye.

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The Arachne is a creature from Greek mythology, whose name was later used for words like “arachnid” and “arachnophobia.” There’s very little to fear about the story of Arachne, however. Hers is a cautionary tale about pride that we can all learn from. According to the myth, Arachne was a very famous and talented weaver. […]

In Greek mythology, Centaurs (or Kentauroi) are half-man, half horse creatures that inhabited the mountains and forests of Thessaly. Centaurs were said to be primal, existing in tribes and making their homes in caves, hunting wild animals and arming themselves with rocks and tree branches.

Cerberus: The three Headed Dog of Greek Mythology There are many unique creatures mentioned in Greek mythology. One of the most well known may be the three-headed dog known as Cerberus. It was the job of Cerberus to guard the entrance to Hades. In Greek mythology, this was the underworld where spirits of the dead […]

Storynory Ltd, 26 Star Street, London UK. +44 (0) 7941 190 740. Main point of contact - [email protected] Audio and texts are Copyright Storynory Ltd unless otherwise stated. Images are copyrighted to their owners. Many images on this site are licenced from Shutterstock.

Our Terms and Conditions make it easy for schools to use our materials for free, please see our Copywrite Page for details

A giant otherworldly monster that shoots fire from its mouth. The treacherous chief that killed his father. A super-smart fish dinner. We wrap up this chapter of the legend of Finn MacCool

No matter where you’re from, you probably have your fair share of wild myths. From stuff like the legend of King Arthur and his magic BFF to the mischievous gods of Ancient Greece to the insane epics of Hindu mythology, just about every culture comes with a set of stories that most other cultures call foreign or strange.

But then there are the universal myths—myths that crop up repeatedly in cultures separated by hundreds of miles and thousands of years. These myths are so near-universal that their prevalence is downright spooky.


The idea of a flood that drowns the entire world pops up in almost every single culture. Jews and Christians know it as the story of Noah, but other versions almost certainly predate the Genesis account. The Ancient Sumerian Epic of Gilgamesh includes the tale of Utnapishtim , who builds a boat, fills it with animals to escape a deluge, and eventually comes to rest on a mountaintop. The Greeks had Deucalion, who survived a flood sent by Zeus. Other versions appear in Hindu, Mayan, and Native American legends.

The terms "myth," "folklore," "legend," and "fairy tale" are often used interchangeably, leading to the misconception that they mean the same thing: fanciful tales. While it's true that these terms may refer to bodies of writing that answer some of life's basic questions, each presents a unique reader experience. They've all stood the test of time, which speaks volumes about their ongoing hold on our imaginations.

A myth is a traditional story that may answer life's overarching questions, such as the origins of the world or of a people. A myth can also be an attempt to explain mysteries, supernatural events, and cultural traditions. Sometimes sacred in nature, a myth can involve gods or other creatures. And a myth presents reality in dramatic ways.

Many cultures have their own versions of common myths, which contain archetypal images and themes. Myth criticism is used to analyze these threads in literature. A prominent name in myth criticism is Northrop Frye.

The Arachne is a creature from Greek mythology, whose name was later used for words like “arachnid” and “arachnophobia.” There’s very little to fear about the story of Arachne, however. Hers is a cautionary tale about pride that we can all learn from. According to the myth, Arachne was a very famous and talented weaver. […]

In Greek mythology, Centaurs (or Kentauroi) are half-man, half horse creatures that inhabited the mountains and forests of Thessaly. Centaurs were said to be primal, existing in tribes and making their homes in caves, hunting wild animals and arming themselves with rocks and tree branches.

Cerberus: The three Headed Dog of Greek Mythology There are many unique creatures mentioned in Greek mythology. One of the most well known may be the three-headed dog known as Cerberus. It was the job of Cerberus to guard the entrance to Hades. In Greek mythology, this was the underworld where spirits of the dead […]

Storynory Ltd, 26 Star Street, London UK. +44 (0) 7941 190 740. Main point of contact - [email protected] Audio and texts are Copyright Storynory Ltd unless otherwise stated. Images are copyrighted to their owners. Many images on this site are licenced from Shutterstock.

Our Terms and Conditions make it easy for schools to use our materials for free, please see our Copywrite Page for details

A giant otherworldly monster that shoots fire from its mouth. The treacherous chief that killed his father. A super-smart fish dinner. We wrap up this chapter of the legend of Finn MacCool


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