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After getting laid off from his health care operations job in New Jersey in January, Mark Williams was delighted to get called in for an interview with a major hospital system in March. His initial interview went well, and over the next four months, Williams met with everyone from HR to senior management to the CEO. All in all, he had nine interviews, and was told along the way that he was an "outstanding candidate." But in June, the 53-year-old Williams found out the job had gone to someone else.

Unfortunately, Williams’ experience is far from unusual. The job interview process has become nasty and brutish, without the benefit of also being short. Knowing that you might be their only hire for a long time, managers do everything short of polygraph testing to make sure you’re the best person for the job. Multiple interviews, either conducted consecutively or in panels, have become the norm, while old-school “where do you see yourself in five years”-type questioning has given way to inquiries of the “what can you do for me right now” nature. And the whole process can take six months or more.

“It’s like entering a five-mile race, getting there, and then seeing it’s extended to eight miles, 10, and then 12 miles,” says David Lewis, CEO of Operations Inc., a human resources consulting firm.

After getting laid off from his health care operations job in New Jersey in January, Mark Williams was delighted to get called in for an interview with a major hospital system in March. His initial interview went well, and over the next four months, Williams met with everyone from HR to senior management to the CEO. All in all, he had nine interviews, and was told along the way that he was an "outstanding candidate." But in June, the 53-year-old Williams found out the job had gone to someone else.

Unfortunately, Williams’ experience is far from unusual. The job interview process has become nasty and brutish, without the benefit of also being short. Knowing that you might be their only hire for a long time, managers do everything short of polygraph testing to make sure you’re the best person for the job. Multiple interviews, either conducted consecutively or in panels, have become the norm, while old-school “where do you see yourself in five years”-type questioning has given way to inquiries of the “what can you do for me right now” nature. And the whole process can take six months or more.

“It’s like entering a five-mile race, getting there, and then seeing it’s extended to eight miles, 10, and then 12 miles,” says David Lewis, CEO of Operations Inc., a human resources consulting firm.

In a follow-up to his New York Times feature on Tony Hovater, the 29-year-old white nationalist and "Nazi sympathizer next door," Richard Fausset confessed that "there was a hole at the heart" of his story.

Fausset said he hoped his story would answer a fundamental question: "Why did this man — intelligent, socially adroit and raised middle class amid the relatively well-integrated environments of United States military bases — gravitate toward the furthest extremes of American political discourse?" By his own admission, Fausset says he never got a good answer during his reporting, during which he visited Hovater's hometown.

Upon its publication Saturday afternoon, Fausset's profile of Hovater — who marched in Charlottesville in August — was met with immediate and harsh criticism . Critics of the piece argued that the feature was a soft-focus profile of a modern-day Nazi, complete with details about Hovater's wedding registry and his "Midwestern manners [that] would please anyone’s mother."

Do you have a job interview coming up? The best way to get ready for an interview is to take the time to review the most common interview questions you will most likely be asked. Knowing what you're going to say can eliminate a lot of interview stress .

You don't need to memorize an answer, but do take the time to consider how you'll respond. The more you prepare, the more confident you'll feel during a job interview.

Review examples of the best answers for the most frequently asked interview questions in several different categories, and advice on how to answer. 

Mike Newall has been writing for the Inquirer since 2010. Originally from Brooklyn, N.Y., he has been writing about Philadelphia crime, courts, politics, and neighborhoods since 2003. Before joining the Inquirer, he was a staff writer and columnist for Philadelphia Weekly and Philadelphia City Paper. He lives in Philadelphia with his wife and dog.

Inside the sweltering Simpson Memorial Church on Kensington Avenue — now a needle exchange — the gathering crowd fanned themselves with the pamphlets that city officials had handed out at the door: “Combat the Opioid Epidemic in Philadelphia,” the front page read.

At the altar, a city health official clicked through a PowerPoint presentation, listing the grim statistics of the catastrophe unfolding outside: at least 70,000 heroin users in Philadelphia addicted to dope that is purer than anywhere else; 702 deaths in 2015; 907 last year; maybe as many as 1,200 this year.

A Note to Readers: In response to many queries and comments, we want to make it clear that the two-part investigation of Elena Ferrante by Claudio Gatti was undertaken on behalf of Mr. Gatti’s Italian newspaper Il Sole 24 Ore . After the Il Sole investigation was completed and definitely scheduled to appear on October 2 in Il Sole as well as in the German newspaper Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung and on the French website Mediapart, an English version of both articles was offered to the NYR Daily for publication on the same day. We regret any confusion about the origins of the Il Sole investigation and publication.

Readers may be interested in two extensive discussions of Elena Ferrante’s work in The New York Review , by Rachel Donadio and by Roger Cohen , in December 2014 and in May 2016.

Ever since the first novel by Elena Ferrante was published in Italy in 1992, and especially since the sensational success of the four novels that make up the Neapolitan quartet (2011-2014), there has been much speculation about the writer’s identity. Until now, there were never any photos and almost nothing has been known about her. Yet she has been an oddly public figure in recent years, granting numerous interviews through her small Rome-based publisher, Edizione e/o, and gathering together a volume purporting in part to outline her family background, Frantumaglia: A Writer’s Journey, which will be published in the United States on November 1.

After getting laid off from his health care operations job in New Jersey in January, Mark Williams was delighted to get called in for an interview with a major hospital system in March. His initial interview went well, and over the next four months, Williams met with everyone from HR to senior management to the CEO. All in all, he had nine interviews, and was told along the way that he was an "outstanding candidate." But in June, the 53-year-old Williams found out the job had gone to someone else.

Unfortunately, Williams’ experience is far from unusual. The job interview process has become nasty and brutish, without the benefit of also being short. Knowing that you might be their only hire for a long time, managers do everything short of polygraph testing to make sure you’re the best person for the job. Multiple interviews, either conducted consecutively or in panels, have become the norm, while old-school “where do you see yourself in five years”-type questioning has given way to inquiries of the “what can you do for me right now” nature. And the whole process can take six months or more.

“It’s like entering a five-mile race, getting there, and then seeing it’s extended to eight miles, 10, and then 12 miles,” says David Lewis, CEO of Operations Inc., a human resources consulting firm.

In a follow-up to his New York Times feature on Tony Hovater, the 29-year-old white nationalist and "Nazi sympathizer next door," Richard Fausset confessed that "there was a hole at the heart" of his story.

Fausset said he hoped his story would answer a fundamental question: "Why did this man — intelligent, socially adroit and raised middle class amid the relatively well-integrated environments of United States military bases — gravitate toward the furthest extremes of American political discourse?" By his own admission, Fausset says he never got a good answer during his reporting, during which he visited Hovater's hometown.

Upon its publication Saturday afternoon, Fausset's profile of Hovater — who marched in Charlottesville in August — was met with immediate and harsh criticism . Critics of the piece argued that the feature was a soft-focus profile of a modern-day Nazi, complete with details about Hovater's wedding registry and his "Midwestern manners [that] would please anyone’s mother."

Do you have a job interview coming up? The best way to get ready for an interview is to take the time to review the most common interview questions you will most likely be asked. Knowing what you're going to say can eliminate a lot of interview stress .

You don't need to memorize an answer, but do take the time to consider how you'll respond. The more you prepare, the more confident you'll feel during a job interview.

Review examples of the best answers for the most frequently asked interview questions in several different categories, and advice on how to answer. 

Mike Newall has been writing for the Inquirer since 2010. Originally from Brooklyn, N.Y., he has been writing about Philadelphia crime, courts, politics, and neighborhoods since 2003. Before joining the Inquirer, he was a staff writer and columnist for Philadelphia Weekly and Philadelphia City Paper. He lives in Philadelphia with his wife and dog.

Inside the sweltering Simpson Memorial Church on Kensington Avenue — now a needle exchange — the gathering crowd fanned themselves with the pamphlets that city officials had handed out at the door: “Combat the Opioid Epidemic in Philadelphia,” the front page read.

At the altar, a city health official clicked through a PowerPoint presentation, listing the grim statistics of the catastrophe unfolding outside: at least 70,000 heroin users in Philadelphia addicted to dope that is purer than anywhere else; 702 deaths in 2015; 907 last year; maybe as many as 1,200 this year.

After getting laid off from his health care operations job in New Jersey in January, Mark Williams was delighted to get called in for an interview with a major hospital system in March. His initial interview went well, and over the next four months, Williams met with everyone from HR to senior management to the CEO. All in all, he had nine interviews, and was told along the way that he was an "outstanding candidate." But in June, the 53-year-old Williams found out the job had gone to someone else.

Unfortunately, Williams’ experience is far from unusual. The job interview process has become nasty and brutish, without the benefit of also being short. Knowing that you might be their only hire for a long time, managers do everything short of polygraph testing to make sure you’re the best person for the job. Multiple interviews, either conducted consecutively or in panels, have become the norm, while old-school “where do you see yourself in five years”-type questioning has given way to inquiries of the “what can you do for me right now” nature. And the whole process can take six months or more.

“It’s like entering a five-mile race, getting there, and then seeing it’s extended to eight miles, 10, and then 12 miles,” says David Lewis, CEO of Operations Inc., a human resources consulting firm.

In a follow-up to his New York Times feature on Tony Hovater, the 29-year-old white nationalist and "Nazi sympathizer next door," Richard Fausset confessed that "there was a hole at the heart" of his story.

Fausset said he hoped his story would answer a fundamental question: "Why did this man — intelligent, socially adroit and raised middle class amid the relatively well-integrated environments of United States military bases — gravitate toward the furthest extremes of American political discourse?" By his own admission, Fausset says he never got a good answer during his reporting, during which he visited Hovater's hometown.

Upon its publication Saturday afternoon, Fausset's profile of Hovater — who marched in Charlottesville in August — was met with immediate and harsh criticism . Critics of the piece argued that the feature was a soft-focus profile of a modern-day Nazi, complete with details about Hovater's wedding registry and his "Midwestern manners [that] would please anyone’s mother."

Do you have a job interview coming up? The best way to get ready for an interview is to take the time to review the most common interview questions you will most likely be asked. Knowing what you're going to say can eliminate a lot of interview stress .

You don't need to memorize an answer, but do take the time to consider how you'll respond. The more you prepare, the more confident you'll feel during a job interview.

Review examples of the best answers for the most frequently asked interview questions in several different categories, and advice on how to answer. 

After getting laid off from his health care operations job in New Jersey in January, Mark Williams was delighted to get called in for an interview with a major hospital system in March. His initial interview went well, and over the next four months, Williams met with everyone from HR to senior management to the CEO. All in all, he had nine interviews, and was told along the way that he was an "outstanding candidate." But in June, the 53-year-old Williams found out the job had gone to someone else.

Unfortunately, Williams’ experience is far from unusual. The job interview process has become nasty and brutish, without the benefit of also being short. Knowing that you might be their only hire for a long time, managers do everything short of polygraph testing to make sure you’re the best person for the job. Multiple interviews, either conducted consecutively or in panels, have become the norm, while old-school “where do you see yourself in five years”-type questioning has given way to inquiries of the “what can you do for me right now” nature. And the whole process can take six months or more.

“It’s like entering a five-mile race, getting there, and then seeing it’s extended to eight miles, 10, and then 12 miles,” says David Lewis, CEO of Operations Inc., a human resources consulting firm.

In a follow-up to his New York Times feature on Tony Hovater, the 29-year-old white nationalist and "Nazi sympathizer next door," Richard Fausset confessed that "there was a hole at the heart" of his story.

Fausset said he hoped his story would answer a fundamental question: "Why did this man — intelligent, socially adroit and raised middle class amid the relatively well-integrated environments of United States military bases — gravitate toward the furthest extremes of American political discourse?" By his own admission, Fausset says he never got a good answer during his reporting, during which he visited Hovater's hometown.

Upon its publication Saturday afternoon, Fausset's profile of Hovater — who marched in Charlottesville in August — was met with immediate and harsh criticism . Critics of the piece argued that the feature was a soft-focus profile of a modern-day Nazi, complete with details about Hovater's wedding registry and his "Midwestern manners [that] would please anyone’s mother."

Do you have a job interview coming up? The best way to get ready for an interview is to take the time to review the most common interview questions you will most likely be asked. Knowing what you're going to say can eliminate a lot of interview stress .

You don't need to memorize an answer, but do take the time to consider how you'll respond. The more you prepare, the more confident you'll feel during a job interview.

Review examples of the best answers for the most frequently asked interview questions in several different categories, and advice on how to answer. 

Mike Newall has been writing for the Inquirer since 2010. Originally from Brooklyn, N.Y., he has been writing about Philadelphia crime, courts, politics, and neighborhoods since 2003. Before joining the Inquirer, he was a staff writer and columnist for Philadelphia Weekly and Philadelphia City Paper. He lives in Philadelphia with his wife and dog.

Inside the sweltering Simpson Memorial Church on Kensington Avenue — now a needle exchange — the gathering crowd fanned themselves with the pamphlets that city officials had handed out at the door: “Combat the Opioid Epidemic in Philadelphia,” the front page read.

At the altar, a city health official clicked through a PowerPoint presentation, listing the grim statistics of the catastrophe unfolding outside: at least 70,000 heroin users in Philadelphia addicted to dope that is purer than anywhere else; 702 deaths in 2015; 907 last year; maybe as many as 1,200 this year.

A Note to Readers: In response to many queries and comments, we want to make it clear that the two-part investigation of Elena Ferrante by Claudio Gatti was undertaken on behalf of Mr. Gatti’s Italian newspaper Il Sole 24 Ore . After the Il Sole investigation was completed and definitely scheduled to appear on October 2 in Il Sole as well as in the German newspaper Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung and on the French website Mediapart, an English version of both articles was offered to the NYR Daily for publication on the same day. We regret any confusion about the origins of the Il Sole investigation and publication.

Readers may be interested in two extensive discussions of Elena Ferrante’s work in The New York Review , by Rachel Donadio and by Roger Cohen , in December 2014 and in May 2016.

Ever since the first novel by Elena Ferrante was published in Italy in 1992, and especially since the sensational success of the four novels that make up the Neapolitan quartet (2011-2014), there has been much speculation about the writer’s identity. Until now, there were never any photos and almost nothing has been known about her. Yet she has been an oddly public figure in recent years, granting numerous interviews through her small Rome-based publisher, Edizione e/o, and gathering together a volume purporting in part to outline her family background, Frantumaglia: A Writer’s Journey, which will be published in the United States on November 1.

The first responsive pleading filed by the defendant in a civil action; a formal written statement that admits or denies the allegations in the complaint and sets forth any available affirmative defenses .

The answer gives the plaintiff notice of the issues the defendant will raise as the case progresses and enables the plaintiff to adequately prepare a case. In most jurisdictions, the answer must be filed within twenty days after receipt of the summons and complaint, although local rules and customs may dictate different filing times.

The answer, like the complaint, ends with a "wherefore" clause that summarizes the defendant's demands, such as demands for a jury trial and judgment in the defendant's favor. Only one wherefore clause is generally needed, although local practice may dictate that each denial and each affirmative defense have its own wherefore clause.

After getting laid off from his health care operations job in New Jersey in January, Mark Williams was delighted to get called in for an interview with a major hospital system in March. His initial interview went well, and over the next four months, Williams met with everyone from HR to senior management to the CEO. All in all, he had nine interviews, and was told along the way that he was an "outstanding candidate." But in June, the 53-year-old Williams found out the job had gone to someone else.

Unfortunately, Williams’ experience is far from unusual. The job interview process has become nasty and brutish, without the benefit of also being short. Knowing that you might be their only hire for a long time, managers do everything short of polygraph testing to make sure you’re the best person for the job. Multiple interviews, either conducted consecutively or in panels, have become the norm, while old-school “where do you see yourself in five years”-type questioning has given way to inquiries of the “what can you do for me right now” nature. And the whole process can take six months or more.

“It’s like entering a five-mile race, getting there, and then seeing it’s extended to eight miles, 10, and then 12 miles,” says David Lewis, CEO of Operations Inc., a human resources consulting firm.

In a follow-up to his New York Times feature on Tony Hovater, the 29-year-old white nationalist and "Nazi sympathizer next door," Richard Fausset confessed that "there was a hole at the heart" of his story.

Fausset said he hoped his story would answer a fundamental question: "Why did this man — intelligent, socially adroit and raised middle class amid the relatively well-integrated environments of United States military bases — gravitate toward the furthest extremes of American political discourse?" By his own admission, Fausset says he never got a good answer during his reporting, during which he visited Hovater's hometown.

Upon its publication Saturday afternoon, Fausset's profile of Hovater — who marched in Charlottesville in August — was met with immediate and harsh criticism . Critics of the piece argued that the feature was a soft-focus profile of a modern-day Nazi, complete with details about Hovater's wedding registry and his "Midwestern manners [that] would please anyone’s mother."


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