We finde book :

(writing the horror movie ) author: marc blake sep-2013 - Amazon.com: Writing the Horror Movie (9781441196187): Marc.



Tales of horror have always been with us, from Biblical times to the Gothic novel to successful modern day authors and screenwriters. Though the genre is often maligned, it is huge in popularity and its resilience is undeniable. Marc Blake and Sara Bailey offer a detailed analysis of the horror genre, including its subgenres, tropes and the specific requirements of the horror screenplay.

Film Ally
c/o Nimble Sage Group, LLC
1940 Duke St. Suite# 200
Alexandria VA, 22314
[email protected]

There are two kinds of horror movies. There’s the basic gross-out horror movie where it’s really just about creating a progression of increasingly horrible images and getting a high body count. These movies have a very simple formula: establish a bunch of characters and a bunch of relationships and then, one by one, kill those characters off with the greatest efficiency and bloodiness. All the creative work in those movies really just goes into creating the most horrible of horrors. It’s about making the most disgusting, horrible, frightening “this is going to haunt me in my dreams, I can’t un-see that” kind of moment.

But the best horror movies try to do something much bigger. The best horror movies are either psychological commentaries or political commentaries or sometimes both.

For example , Dawn of the Dead  is actually about consumerism. There’s a reason they’re stuck in a shopping mall, because the horror of their situation is really just a metaphor for the horror of consumerism and the way it makes zombies of us all.

Horror is a high concept genre that can lend itself easily to low budget filmmaking (both feature and short film), so it’s no wonder I get so many of them across my desk via B2W and my industry clients. What’s more, audiences’ gore tolerance is on the UP, so television can be considerably more scary and violent than it used to be as well.

Yet just there ARE some classic clangers scribes can fall into when attempting the horror genre, so check this out for size because they will kill your Horror screenplay DEAD:

Look, we get it. It’s a horror, which is why you’re hacking everyone to pieces. But if you’ve not got a discernible narrative to go with the grisly stuff, believe it or not it just gets dull after a while! TRUE STORY. MORE: Why Horror And Comedy Aren’t That Different 

Tales of horror have always been with us, from Biblical times to the Gothic novel to successful modern day authors and screenwriters. Though the genre is often maligned, it is huge in popularity and its resilience is undeniable. Marc Blake and Sara Bailey offer a detailed analysis of the horror genre, including its subgenres, tropes and the specific requirements of the horror screenplay.

Film Ally
c/o Nimble Sage Group, LLC
1940 Duke St. Suite# 200
Alexandria VA, 22314
[email protected]

There are two kinds of horror movies. There’s the basic gross-out horror movie where it’s really just about creating a progression of increasingly horrible images and getting a high body count. These movies have a very simple formula: establish a bunch of characters and a bunch of relationships and then, one by one, kill those characters off with the greatest efficiency and bloodiness. All the creative work in those movies really just goes into creating the most horrible of horrors. It’s about making the most disgusting, horrible, frightening “this is going to haunt me in my dreams, I can’t un-see that” kind of moment.

But the best horror movies try to do something much bigger. The best horror movies are either psychological commentaries or political commentaries or sometimes both.

For example , Dawn of the Dead  is actually about consumerism. There’s a reason they’re stuck in a shopping mall, because the horror of their situation is really just a metaphor for the horror of consumerism and the way it makes zombies of us all.

Tales of horror have always been with us, from Biblical times to the Gothic novel to successful modern day authors and screenwriters. Though the genre is often maligned, it is huge in popularity and its resilience is undeniable. Marc Blake and Sara Bailey offer a detailed analysis of the horror genre, including its subgenres, tropes and the specific requirements of the horror screenplay.

Film Ally
c/o Nimble Sage Group, LLC
1940 Duke St. Suite# 200
Alexandria VA, 22314
[email protected]


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