We finde book :

The adult learner: the definitive classic in adult education and human resource development - The Adult Learner - Google Books



Adult learners are a diverse group – typically age 25 and older –  with a wide range of educational and cultural backgrounds, adult responsibilities and job experiences. They typically do not follow the traditional pattern of enrolling in postsecondary education immediately after high school.

They often return to school to stay competitive in the workplace or prepare for a career change. And they usually study on a part-time basis, taking one or two courses a term while maintaining work and family responsibilities

Nebraska Institute for the Study of Adult Literacy summarizes assumptions about the adult learner based on the research of John Dirkx and Ruth Lavin and Sol Pelavin’s The Adult Learner Model.


When it comes to learning, adults are not over sized children. Maturity brings unique characteristics that affect how adults are motivated to learn. By appealing to the unique qualities of adult learners, we can design more effective and motivating online courses. Here’s a list of generalized characteristics common to many but not all adult learners.

Wow – only this morning did I publish my own article about adult learning principles: http://ryan2point0.wordpress.com – I would add “time poor” to your list of characteristics, and I support your observation that the list is common to many *but not all* adult learners.

Your addition of Time Poor is a good one. I thought I had it covered under “Outside Responsibilities” but Time Poor might be a better way to note it as a characteristic. Your article is great and a nice companion to this one. I hope everyone who reads this article will go and see Ryan’s too. Maybe we can write on the same topic on purpose some time!

Adult learners are a diverse group – typically age 25 and older –  with a wide range of educational and cultural backgrounds, adult responsibilities and job experiences. They typically do not follow the traditional pattern of enrolling in postsecondary education immediately after high school.

They often return to school to stay competitive in the workplace or prepare for a career change. And they usually study on a part-time basis, taking one or two courses a term while maintaining work and family responsibilities

Nebraska Institute for the Study of Adult Literacy summarizes assumptions about the adult learner based on the research of John Dirkx and Ruth Lavin and Sol Pelavin’s The Adult Learner Model.


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