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Managing women: disciplining labor in modern japan - Managing Female Employees The Right Way | Robin Coyle



The latest Census Bureau statistics reveal that women owned businesses are hotter than ever. Between 1997 and 2002 women started businesses at twice the national rate. Women-owned businesses with more than $1 million in revenue went up by 18% and those with more than 100 employees went up by 10%.

One upshot of all this growth is that now there are more women in leadership positions than ever. Whether they head their division or head the whole company, these women are in a position to do something they may have wanted to do for a long time. Hire other women.

Women like working with other smart, savvy women. There's often less ego involved and more willingness to collaborate. As woman leaders, we can create a culture where success doesn't have to mean trying to become "one of the guys." But our idealistic visions of women working together do not always translate smoothly into practice. There's no guarantee that just because we hire other women, everyone will magically get along. Here are a few of the more common problem areas we can encounter:

The latest Census Bureau statistics reveal that women owned businesses are hotter than ever. Between 1997 and 2002 women started businesses at twice the national rate. Women-owned businesses with more than $1 million in revenue went up by 18% and those with more than 100 employees went up by 10%.

One upshot of all this growth is that now there are more women in leadership positions than ever. Whether they head their division or head the whole company, these women are in a position to do something they may have wanted to do for a long time. Hire other women.

Women like working with other smart, savvy women. There's often less ego involved and more willingness to collaborate. As woman leaders, we can create a culture where success doesn't have to mean trying to become "one of the guys." But our idealistic visions of women working together do not always translate smoothly into practice. There's no guarantee that just because we hire other women, everyone will magically get along. Here are a few of the more common problem areas we can encounter:

Studies show the majority of women believe confidence is key to effective leadership, but it’s something they struggle with throughout their careers. So what can they do to enhance their presence at senior levels?

Almost all the successful career women who have achieved a seat at the top table have applied their business savvy in two strategic ways that help to position them as leaders who truly makes a mark.

There has been a lot of discussion about the stereotypes contributing to the lack of women in the c-suite. But one of the biggest obstacles could be their own assumptions about the path they’re supposed to take.

Sometimes even the most well-intentioned men come across as patronizing, Joanne Lipman argues. itupictures/flickr

Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg made "lean in" a catchphrase for ambitious professional women around the world, and there are loads of leadership conferences, seminars, and articles dedicated to helping women excel in their careers.

These are all great, author and journalist Joanne Lipman says, but women get it at this point. Our attention needs to turn towards educating men.

The latest Census Bureau statistics reveal that women owned businesses are hotter than ever. Between 1997 and 2002 women started businesses at twice the national rate. Women-owned businesses with more than $1 million in revenue went up by 18% and those with more than 100 employees went up by 10%.

One upshot of all this growth is that now there are more women in leadership positions than ever. Whether they head their division or head the whole company, these women are in a position to do something they may have wanted to do for a long time. Hire other women.

Women like working with other smart, savvy women. There's often less ego involved and more willingness to collaborate. As woman leaders, we can create a culture where success doesn't have to mean trying to become "one of the guys." But our idealistic visions of women working together do not always translate smoothly into practice. There's no guarantee that just because we hire other women, everyone will magically get along. Here are a few of the more common problem areas we can encounter:

Studies show the majority of women believe confidence is key to effective leadership, but it’s something they struggle with throughout their careers. So what can they do to enhance their presence at senior levels?

Almost all the successful career women who have achieved a seat at the top table have applied their business savvy in two strategic ways that help to position them as leaders who truly makes a mark.

There has been a lot of discussion about the stereotypes contributing to the lack of women in the c-suite. But one of the biggest obstacles could be their own assumptions about the path they’re supposed to take.


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