We finde book :

Jewish studies and the european academic world (collection de la revue des etudes juives) - Jewish-Studies | Jewish Studies | College of Liberal Arts.



Judaic Studies enables students to develop a broad knowledge of the history, religion, literature, philosophy, languages, and politics of the Jews.  Jewish societies, texts, ideologies, material cultures, and institutions are studied in a comparative perspective in the context of histories, cultures, and intellectual traditions among which Jews have lived throughout the ages.  As an interdisciplinary program, Judaic Studies employs historical, literary, political, social and philosophical methods of analysis.

The major includes a set of core requirements and two areas of concentration.  Students may count up to three Hebrew language courses toward the completion of the major requirements.  Those who choose not to study modern Hebrew must enroll in at least two courses in Hebrew literature in translation.

Students considering the major in Judaic Studies should contact the director of undergraduate studies as soon as possible.

The Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library and the Center for Jewish Studies are pleased to announce the availability of new fellowships, with awards of $1500, to support scholars, students and independent researchers whose work would benefit from access to the Judaica materials held by the Rubenstein Library, the Duke Divinity School Library and/or Perkins Library. 

Research topics must be strongly supported by Judaica collections held by the Rubenstein Library, the Duke Divinity School Library and/or Perkins Library. We encourage each applicant to discuss his or her research project and the materials that might support it with  Rachel Ariel , librarian for Judaica/Hebraica, before submitting an application. Applicants who speak with a staff member about their projects often produce stronger applications.

Jewish Studies Fellowship Program
Attn: Rachel Ariel
Librarian for Judaica/Hebraica 
Box 90195
Duke University
Durham, NC 27708-0185
USA

We launch the organizations that engage others in Jewish life, write the textbooks others learn from, and graduate leaders who become a new creative force for positive change in their careers and communities.

“JTS gave me tools to navigate the sea of Torah and Jewish living that I apply to all aspects of my rabbinate today. These tools are invaluable to me as I work to be an innovative and authentic rabbi for today’s world.” Ethan Witkovsky, Assistant Rabbi, Park Avenue Synagogue Choose Your School Each School At JTS Is Dedicated To A Specific Educational Purpose List College For dual BAs with Columbia University or Barnard College

Judaic Studies enables students to develop a broad knowledge of the history, religion, literature, philosophy, languages, and politics of the Jews.  Jewish societies, texts, ideologies, material cultures, and institutions are studied in a comparative perspective in the context of histories, cultures, and intellectual traditions among which Jews have lived throughout the ages.  As an interdisciplinary program, Judaic Studies employs historical, literary, political, social and philosophical methods of analysis.

The major includes a set of core requirements and two areas of concentration.  Students may count up to three Hebrew language courses toward the completion of the major requirements.  Those who choose not to study modern Hebrew must enroll in at least two courses in Hebrew literature in translation.

Students considering the major in Judaic Studies should contact the director of undergraduate studies as soon as possible.

The Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library and the Center for Jewish Studies are pleased to announce the availability of new fellowships, with awards of $1500, to support scholars, students and independent researchers whose work would benefit from access to the Judaica materials held by the Rubenstein Library, the Duke Divinity School Library and/or Perkins Library. 

Research topics must be strongly supported by Judaica collections held by the Rubenstein Library, the Duke Divinity School Library and/or Perkins Library. We encourage each applicant to discuss his or her research project and the materials that might support it with  Rachel Ariel , librarian for Judaica/Hebraica, before submitting an application. Applicants who speak with a staff member about their projects often produce stronger applications.

Jewish Studies Fellowship Program
Attn: Rachel Ariel
Librarian for Judaica/Hebraica 
Box 90195
Duke University
Durham, NC 27708-0185
USA

We launch the organizations that engage others in Jewish life, write the textbooks others learn from, and graduate leaders who become a new creative force for positive change in their careers and communities.

“JTS gave me tools to navigate the sea of Torah and Jewish living that I apply to all aspects of my rabbinate today. These tools are invaluable to me as I work to be an innovative and authentic rabbi for today’s world.” Ethan Witkovsky, Assistant Rabbi, Park Avenue Synagogue Choose Your School Each School At JTS Is Dedicated To A Specific Educational Purpose List College For dual BAs with Columbia University or Barnard College

Jewish studies, sometimes referred to as Judaic studies, explores the many facets of Jewish life and culture, including Jewish history, language, religion, politics and education. Students in this field need to be able to engage in debate, think critically and communicate effectively, as well as have good organizational skills.

Jewish studies majors have the opportunity to study abroad and can pursue certificates or associate, bachelor's, master's or doctoral degrees. While a bachelor's degree or certificate can lead to a job as a Jewish educator or a job within a Jewish organization, rabbis and university-level Jewish study educators require seminary training (for rabbis) or graduate degrees. College courses include, but aren't limited to, Hebrew, anthropology, Jewish history and Jewish literature. The following articles describe some of the degree options in Jewish studies.

Several distance learning career programs are available in the Jewish studies field. The articles below will help you select one of these programs.

The Study Group on Jewish Studies and Music fosters the study of the intersections between Jewish culture and music. Its focus is both Jewish music—its complex meanings and varied roles—and, more broadly, the processes and negotiations that condition music in various Jewish contexts, including the compositions and activities of Jewish and non-Jewish musicians, responses to those musics and activities, and their historical and cultural foundations.

Award for Excellence for an Edited Volume on Jewish Studies and Music: Tina Fruehauf and Lily Hirsch, Dislocated Memories: Jews, Music, and Postwar German Culture (Oxford University Press).

Award for Excellence for a Book on Jewish Studies and Music: David Broadbeck, Defining Deutschtum: Political Ideology, German Identity, and Music-Critical Discourse in Liberal Vienna  (Oxford University Press).

Judaic Studies enables students to develop a broad knowledge of the history, religion, literature, philosophy, languages, and politics of the Jews.  Jewish societies, texts, ideologies, material cultures, and institutions are studied in a comparative perspective in the context of histories, cultures, and intellectual traditions among which Jews have lived throughout the ages.  As an interdisciplinary program, Judaic Studies employs historical, literary, political, social and philosophical methods of analysis.

The major includes a set of core requirements and two areas of concentration.  Students may count up to three Hebrew language courses toward the completion of the major requirements.  Those who choose not to study modern Hebrew must enroll in at least two courses in Hebrew literature in translation.

Students considering the major in Judaic Studies should contact the director of undergraduate studies as soon as possible.

The Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library and the Center for Jewish Studies are pleased to announce the availability of new fellowships, with awards of $1500, to support scholars, students and independent researchers whose work would benefit from access to the Judaica materials held by the Rubenstein Library, the Duke Divinity School Library and/or Perkins Library. 

Research topics must be strongly supported by Judaica collections held by the Rubenstein Library, the Duke Divinity School Library and/or Perkins Library. We encourage each applicant to discuss his or her research project and the materials that might support it with  Rachel Ariel , librarian for Judaica/Hebraica, before submitting an application. Applicants who speak with a staff member about their projects often produce stronger applications.

Jewish Studies Fellowship Program
Attn: Rachel Ariel
Librarian for Judaica/Hebraica 
Box 90195
Duke University
Durham, NC 27708-0185
USA

Judaic Studies enables students to develop a broad knowledge of the history, religion, literature, philosophy, languages, and politics of the Jews.  Jewish societies, texts, ideologies, material cultures, and institutions are studied in a comparative perspective in the context of histories, cultures, and intellectual traditions among which Jews have lived throughout the ages.  As an interdisciplinary program, Judaic Studies employs historical, literary, political, social and philosophical methods of analysis.

The major includes a set of core requirements and two areas of concentration.  Students may count up to three Hebrew language courses toward the completion of the major requirements.  Those who choose not to study modern Hebrew must enroll in at least two courses in Hebrew literature in translation.

Students considering the major in Judaic Studies should contact the director of undergraduate studies as soon as possible.

Judaic Studies enables students to develop a broad knowledge of the history, religion, literature, philosophy, languages, and politics of the Jews.  Jewish societies, texts, ideologies, material cultures, and institutions are studied in a comparative perspective in the context of histories, cultures, and intellectual traditions among which Jews have lived throughout the ages.  As an interdisciplinary program, Judaic Studies employs historical, literary, political, social and philosophical methods of analysis.

The major includes a set of core requirements and two areas of concentration.  Students may count up to three Hebrew language courses toward the completion of the major requirements.  Those who choose not to study modern Hebrew must enroll in at least two courses in Hebrew literature in translation.

Students considering the major in Judaic Studies should contact the director of undergraduate studies as soon as possible.

The Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library and the Center for Jewish Studies are pleased to announce the availability of new fellowships, with awards of $1500, to support scholars, students and independent researchers whose work would benefit from access to the Judaica materials held by the Rubenstein Library, the Duke Divinity School Library and/or Perkins Library. 

Research topics must be strongly supported by Judaica collections held by the Rubenstein Library, the Duke Divinity School Library and/or Perkins Library. We encourage each applicant to discuss his or her research project and the materials that might support it with  Rachel Ariel , librarian for Judaica/Hebraica, before submitting an application. Applicants who speak with a staff member about their projects often produce stronger applications.

Jewish Studies Fellowship Program
Attn: Rachel Ariel
Librarian for Judaica/Hebraica 
Box 90195
Duke University
Durham, NC 27708-0185
USA

We launch the organizations that engage others in Jewish life, write the textbooks others learn from, and graduate leaders who become a new creative force for positive change in their careers and communities.

“JTS gave me tools to navigate the sea of Torah and Jewish living that I apply to all aspects of my rabbinate today. These tools are invaluable to me as I work to be an innovative and authentic rabbi for today’s world.” Ethan Witkovsky, Assistant Rabbi, Park Avenue Synagogue Choose Your School Each School At JTS Is Dedicated To A Specific Educational Purpose List College For dual BAs with Columbia University or Barnard College

Jewish studies, sometimes referred to as Judaic studies, explores the many facets of Jewish life and culture, including Jewish history, language, religion, politics and education. Students in this field need to be able to engage in debate, think critically and communicate effectively, as well as have good organizational skills.

Jewish studies majors have the opportunity to study abroad and can pursue certificates or associate, bachelor's, master's or doctoral degrees. While a bachelor's degree or certificate can lead to a job as a Jewish educator or a job within a Jewish organization, rabbis and university-level Jewish study educators require seminary training (for rabbis) or graduate degrees. College courses include, but aren't limited to, Hebrew, anthropology, Jewish history and Jewish literature. The following articles describe some of the degree options in Jewish studies.

Several distance learning career programs are available in the Jewish studies field. The articles below will help you select one of these programs.


418knRge2bL