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Indian gooseberry extracts put to the test head-to-head against cholesterol-lowing statin drugs and the blood thinners aspirin and Plavix.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Indian gooseberries, otherwise known as amla, have been touted as everything from a cancer fighter to a “hair tonic” to a “refrigerant,” whatever that means—what, like freon? Not to mention, a “snake venom detoxifier.” Complete with fancy diagrams, but based on what kind of research?

A zombie ( Haitian French : zombi , Haitian Creole : zonbi ) is a fictional undead being created through the reanimation of a human corpse . Zombies are most commonly found in horror and fantasy genre works. The term comes from Haitian folklore , where a zombie is a dead body reanimated through various methods, most commonly magic . Modern depictions of the reanimation of the dead do not necessarily involve magic but often invoke science fictional methods such as carriers , radiation , mental diseases, vectors , viruses , scientific accidents, etc. [1] [2]

The English word "zombie" is first recorded in 1819, in a history of Brazil by the poet Robert Southey , in the form of "zombi". [3] The Oxford English Dictionary gives the origin of the word as West African, and compares it to the Kongo words nzambi (god) and zumbi ( fetish ).

One of the first books to expose Western culture to the concept of the voodoo zombie was The Magic Island by W. B. Seabrook in 1929. This is the sensationalized account of a narrator who encounters voodoo cults in Haiti and their resurrected thralls. Time claimed that the book "introduced 'zombi' into U.S. speech". [4]

Indian gooseberry extracts put to the test head-to-head against cholesterol-lowing statin drugs and the blood thinners aspirin and Plavix.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Indian gooseberries, otherwise known as amla, have been touted as everything from a cancer fighter to a “hair tonic” to a “refrigerant,” whatever that means—what, like freon? Not to mention, a “snake venom detoxifier.” Complete with fancy diagrams, but based on what kind of research?

Indian gooseberry extracts put to the test head-to-head against cholesterol-lowing statin drugs and the blood thinners aspirin and Plavix.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Indian gooseberries, otherwise known as amla, have been touted as everything from a cancer fighter to a “hair tonic” to a “refrigerant,” whatever that means—what, like freon? Not to mention, a “snake venom detoxifier.” Complete with fancy diagrams, but based on what kind of research?

A zombie ( Haitian French : zombi , Haitian Creole : zonbi ) is a fictional undead being created through the reanimation of a human corpse . Zombies are most commonly found in horror and fantasy genre works. The term comes from Haitian folklore , where a zombie is a dead body reanimated through various methods, most commonly magic . Modern depictions of the reanimation of the dead do not necessarily involve magic but often invoke science fictional methods such as carriers , radiation , mental diseases, vectors , viruses , scientific accidents, etc. [1] [2]

The English word "zombie" is first recorded in 1819, in a history of Brazil by the poet Robert Southey , in the form of "zombi". [3] The Oxford English Dictionary gives the origin of the word as West African, and compares it to the Kongo words nzambi (god) and zumbi ( fetish ).

One of the first books to expose Western culture to the concept of the voodoo zombie was The Magic Island by W. B. Seabrook in 1929. This is the sensationalized account of a narrator who encounters voodoo cults in Haiti and their resurrected thralls. Time claimed that the book "introduced 'zombi' into U.S. speech". [4]

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