We finde book :

Music of the spheres (the interstellar age book 2) (volume 2) - - Music of the Spheres - Tuned Wind Chimes



Ratings for just this episode were never calculated. It was only aired as a part of Doctor Who at the Proms .

Music of the Spheres was released on DVD in the UK on 19 January 2009 as a bonus feature with The Next Doctor . Also included was the rest of the BBC Proms Doctor Who concert. North American release occurred on 15th September 2009, marking the first availability of the mini-episode in North America.

The DVD version of Music of the Spheres appears to differ somewhat from the version originally played at the Albert Hall in that the opening and closing credits -- including the latter's use of the original Derbyshire theme arrangement -- are omitted.

Ratings for just this episode were never calculated. It was only aired as a part of Doctor Who at the Proms .

Music of the Spheres was released on DVD in the UK on 19 January 2009 as a bonus feature with The Next Doctor . Also included was the rest of the BBC Proms Doctor Who concert. North American release occurred on 15th September 2009, marking the first availability of the mini-episode in North America.

The DVD version of Music of the Spheres appears to differ somewhat from the version originally played at the Albert Hall in that the opening and closing credits -- including the latter's use of the original Derbyshire theme arrangement -- are omitted.

Music of the Spheres was the musical foundation for the music of Destiny written by Marty O'Donnell, Mike Salvarori, and Paul McCartney, which started production in 2012 and was sent off to an orchestra in early 2013 [1] . The full version of its second movement, titled "The Union", was performed live at Video Games Live 2013, and it was announced that Music of the Spheres would be released as a standalone work, having planned to be released in August 2014, one month before Destiny's final release date, to be kept with the composers' intention of a "musical prequel" to the full franchise. It consisted of eight movements and a total of 48 minutes.

Bungie management came to lead composer Marty O'Donnell, asking him to write music ahead of time in 2012. O'Donnell always said that he preferred to write music at the last minute, due to things getting changed or cut, such as the Halo 2 original ending or the many levels that were cut out of Halo 1, 2, and 3, and it also provides him with a better understanding of the level and its role in the overall story. He came up with a concept he described as "centuries old", which was "music for the sake of music". He wrote music that "told its own story", and would be released before the full game to introduce people to the music of Destiny.

At E3 2013, publisher Activision reworked O'Donnell's audio for a trailer entirely at the last minute. They replaced the music with library music and hired a completely unrelated voice actor for the narration. O'Donnell expressed his frustrations on Twitter, stating the music was not his own. This began a legal battle with O'Donnell and Activision, as well as Bungie management CEO Harold Ryan. O'Donnell's work ethic was determined "unacceptable" and he was later fired on April 11th, 2014. O'Donnell made a tweet stating he was fired without cause and went on to sue Bungie, Inc. This court case was resolved on September 4th, 2015 in favor of O'Donnell.

Ratings for just this episode were never calculated. It was only aired as a part of Doctor Who at the Proms .

Music of the Spheres was released on DVD in the UK on 19 January 2009 as a bonus feature with The Next Doctor . Also included was the rest of the BBC Proms Doctor Who concert. North American release occurred on 15th September 2009, marking the first availability of the mini-episode in North America.

The DVD version of Music of the Spheres appears to differ somewhat from the version originally played at the Albert Hall in that the opening and closing credits -- including the latter's use of the original Derbyshire theme arrangement -- are omitted.

Music of the Spheres was the musical foundation for the music of Destiny written by Marty O'Donnell, Mike Salvarori, and Paul McCartney, which started production in 2012 and was sent off to an orchestra in early 2013 [1] . The full version of its second movement, titled "The Union", was performed live at Video Games Live 2013, and it was announced that Music of the Spheres would be released as a standalone work, having planned to be released in August 2014, one month before Destiny's final release date, to be kept with the composers' intention of a "musical prequel" to the full franchise. It consisted of eight movements and a total of 48 minutes.

Bungie management came to lead composer Marty O'Donnell, asking him to write music ahead of time in 2012. O'Donnell always said that he preferred to write music at the last minute, due to things getting changed or cut, such as the Halo 2 original ending or the many levels that were cut out of Halo 1, 2, and 3, and it also provides him with a better understanding of the level and its role in the overall story. He came up with a concept he described as "centuries old", which was "music for the sake of music". He wrote music that "told its own story", and would be released before the full game to introduce people to the music of Destiny.

At E3 2013, publisher Activision reworked O'Donnell's audio for a trailer entirely at the last minute. They replaced the music with library music and hired a completely unrelated voice actor for the narration. O'Donnell expressed his frustrations on Twitter, stating the music was not his own. This began a legal battle with O'Donnell and Activision, as well as Bungie management CEO Harold Ryan. O'Donnell's work ethic was determined "unacceptable" and he was later fired on April 11th, 2014. O'Donnell made a tweet stating he was fired without cause and went on to sue Bungie, Inc. This court case was resolved on September 4th, 2015 in favor of O'Donnell.

HARMONY is a state recognized by great philosophers as the immediate prerequisite of beauty. A compound is termed beautiful only when its parts are in harmonious combination. The world is called beautiful and its Creator is designated the Good because good perforce must act in conformity with its own nature; and good acting according to its own nature is harmony, because the good which it accomplishes is harmonious with the good which it is. Beauty, therefore, is harmony manifesting its own intrinsic nature in the world of form.

The key to harmonic ratios is hidden in the famous Pythagorean tetractys, or pyramid of dots. The tetractys is made up of the first four numbers--1, 2, 3, and 4--which in their proportions reveal the intervals of the octave, the diapente, and the diatessaron. While the law of harmonic intervals as set forth above is true, it has been subsequently proved that hammers striking metal in the manner

described will not produce the various tones ascribed to them. In all probability, therefore, Pythagoras actually worked out his theory of harmony from the monochord--a contrivance consisting of a single string stretched between two pegs and supplied with movable frets.


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