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Paper girls, volume 1 (turtleback school and library binding edition) - Paper Girls, Vol. 1 TP | Releases | Image Comics



At this point they may as well add the release dates of Brian K. Vaughan’s new titles to the list of national holidays, so circle worthy are they on our calendars. Vaughan’s latest, Paper Girls, traverses the early mornings and front stoops of 1988 Cleveland, OH, as seen through the eyes of four young paper delivery girls. Joined by the stellar art team of penciller Cliff Chiang and colorist Matt Wilson, Paper Girls is a lovely start to a coming of age tale full of surprises, and one that makes good on utilizing its extended page count.

Wilson too earns his keep, invigorating Chiang’s pencils with his deceptively brilliant hues. For the most part his colors do their best to stay out of the way, often utilizing flat blues and inky purples to render the fading dark. However, in two standout sequences – the opening dreamscape and the closing cosmic kaleidoscope – Wilson shows just how deliberate each unique pairing truly is.

In the end, Paper Girls is exactly the kind of book we hoped for coming from such an esteemed creative team. It’s real and natural in a way that begets its sci-fi leanings, buoyed by the rock solid characterization that permeates every page. Vaughan’s deft handling of his engaging leads carries the read through even its slowest lulls, and Chiang and Wilson serve as an excellent one-two punch in keeping us visually immersed. While the end reveal is more confusing than truly enticing, when coupled with everything that comes before it results in a read we can’t wait to find on our stoops next month.

At this point they may as well add the release dates of Brian K. Vaughan’s new titles to the list of national holidays, so circle worthy are they on our calendars. Vaughan’s latest, Paper Girls, traverses the early mornings and front stoops of 1988 Cleveland, OH, as seen through the eyes of four young paper delivery girls. Joined by the stellar art team of penciller Cliff Chiang and colorist Matt Wilson, Paper Girls is a lovely start to a coming of age tale full of surprises, and one that makes good on utilizing its extended page count.

Wilson too earns his keep, invigorating Chiang’s pencils with his deceptively brilliant hues. For the most part his colors do their best to stay out of the way, often utilizing flat blues and inky purples to render the fading dark. However, in two standout sequences – the opening dreamscape and the closing cosmic kaleidoscope – Wilson shows just how deliberate each unique pairing truly is.

In the end, Paper Girls is exactly the kind of book we hoped for coming from such an esteemed creative team. It’s real and natural in a way that begets its sci-fi leanings, buoyed by the rock solid characterization that permeates every page. Vaughan’s deft handling of his engaging leads carries the read through even its slowest lulls, and Chiang and Wilson serve as an excellent one-two punch in keeping us visually immersed. While the end reveal is more confusing than truly enticing, when coupled with everything that comes before it results in a read we can’t wait to find on our stoops next month.

The only way I can think to describe Paper Girls is an all-girl version of Stranger Things mixed with a bit of Saga. You can definitely tell that Brian K. Vaughan is the writer of this series because it’s so reminiscent of Saga (which I adore). I loved the girls and their interactions. Their reactions to the “what the hell” moments scattered in this story were super realistic because what the hell actually did happen in this story? I have no idea.

One thing I did have a problem with was the homophobic remarks, but they were challenged by the other characters. I understand the story takes place in the 80s, and there was a different vernacular of the time, but it still made me uncomfortable to read. Speaking of the 80s, I loved the setting. It was really interesting to see things I recognized from both eras since the book dealt with time travel as well.

I have to agree with Katie. Paper Girls felt a lot like a girls-only version of Stranger Things or a tame, PG-13 version of Saga. Brian K. Vaughan has a very distinct style when it comes to fantasy. You can see remnants of his other works in Paper Girls, which I appreciate since I seriously love Saga.


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