We finde book :

Etiquette of naming the baby (etiquette collection) - The Etiquette of File Naming | Ideas Illustrated



My company has a public network that is open to all employees and is used to store shared information. The number of folders is quite large and — in an effort to make the search for a particular folder easier — a few people have started adding exclamation points to the front of their file names. This causes their file to float to the top of an alphabetized list, making it show up front and center when you navigate to the top node of the file hierarchy. Now, is this clever or rude?

Screen real estate is pretty important when it comes to web pages and mobile devices — I’ve heard many stories about departments or individuals who fought to have their information appear “above the fold” on a corporate site — but should this approach apply to an internal file network?

One could argue that only critical files should take pole position: emergency procedures or frequently accessed company data. But what happens when Jim from Marketing is just too lazy to scroll through everyone else’s stuff and vaults his file to first place? Is it OK for Suzie in Finance to then add two exclamation points to the name of her file? Does Bob the CEO get to use three exclamation points? Where does it all end?

My company has a public network that is open to all employees and is used to store shared information. The number of folders is quite large and — in an effort to make the search for a particular folder easier — a few people have started adding exclamation points to the front of their file names. This causes their file to float to the top of an alphabetized list, making it show up front and center when you navigate to the top node of the file hierarchy. Now, is this clever or rude?

Screen real estate is pretty important when it comes to web pages and mobile devices — I’ve heard many stories about departments or individuals who fought to have their information appear “above the fold” on a corporate site — but should this approach apply to an internal file network?

One could argue that only critical files should take pole position: emergency procedures or frequently accessed company data. But what happens when Jim from Marketing is just too lazy to scroll through everyone else’s stuff and vaults his file to first place? Is it OK for Suzie in Finance to then add two exclamation points to the name of her file? Does Bob the CEO get to use three exclamation points? Where does it all end?

Hi! I have more of a naming etiquette question. I am currently pregnant with my first child. This will be the first grandchild on my side of the family. We don’t know the sex, so are picking two names to have ready. We are pretty settled on our boy name (and aren’t sharing with the world, much to everyone’s dismay).

The problem lies in the girl name. Me and my sisters all want to name a child after a beloved grandmother. Since I am the first to have a child, do I get first dibs? I have a feeling my one sister will go ahead and name her child the same thing and that kind of bothers me. Does it bother you? Is it strange to have first cousins with the same name? There are two possible nicknames for this name and we both want the same one.

Let’s also mention that neither of my sisters have a boyfriend or are anywhere close to being married, let alone having a child. My husband and I both love this name and want to honor my grandmother, but also don’t want to have to deal with my sister naming her child the same thing, or even worse, the first thing out of her mouth being, but I am naming my little girl that. Decisions, decisions.

My company has a public network that is open to all employees and is used to store shared information. The number of folders is quite large and — in an effort to make the search for a particular folder easier — a few people have started adding exclamation points to the front of their file names. This causes their file to float to the top of an alphabetized list, making it show up front and center when you navigate to the top node of the file hierarchy. Now, is this clever or rude?

Screen real estate is pretty important when it comes to web pages and mobile devices — I’ve heard many stories about departments or individuals who fought to have their information appear “above the fold” on a corporate site — but should this approach apply to an internal file network?

One could argue that only critical files should take pole position: emergency procedures or frequently accessed company data. But what happens when Jim from Marketing is just too lazy to scroll through everyone else’s stuff and vaults his file to first place? Is it OK for Suzie in Finance to then add two exclamation points to the name of her file? Does Bob the CEO get to use three exclamation points? Where does it all end?

Hi! I have more of a naming etiquette question. I am currently pregnant with my first child. This will be the first grandchild on my side of the family. We don’t know the sex, so are picking two names to have ready. We are pretty settled on our boy name (and aren’t sharing with the world, much to everyone’s dismay).

The problem lies in the girl name. Me and my sisters all want to name a child after a beloved grandmother. Since I am the first to have a child, do I get first dibs? I have a feeling my one sister will go ahead and name her child the same thing and that kind of bothers me. Does it bother you? Is it strange to have first cousins with the same name? There are two possible nicknames for this name and we both want the same one.

Let’s also mention that neither of my sisters have a boyfriend or are anywhere close to being married, let alone having a child. My husband and I both love this name and want to honor my grandmother, but also don’t want to have to deal with my sister naming her child the same thing, or even worse, the first thing out of her mouth being, but I am naming my little girl that. Decisions, decisions.

Sarbani's question about global business etiquette brings up an issue that businesspeople struggle with constantly: How to be courteous in an unfamiliar culture?

My company has a public network that is open to all employees and is used to store shared information. The number of folders is quite large and — in an effort to ...

Download and Read Etiquette Of Naming The Baby The Etiquette Collection Etiquette Of Naming The Baby The Etiquette Collection Reading is a …


515pthGr5aL