We finde book :

An address at the reopening of the pardee hall, lafayette college: november 30, 1880 (classic reprint - Address | Definition of Address by Merriam-Webster



Often abbreviated as c/o, “care of” means through someone or by way of someone. This phrase indicates that something is to be delivered to an addressee where they don’t normally receive correspondence. In practice, it lets the post office know the recipient is not the normal recipient at that street address.
 

Write the recipient’s name on the first line, as you do with most letters. Start the second line with “c/o” followed by the person or company name associated with the address you are using.

It can come in handy when trying to get in touch with someone whose home address you don’t know. It can also be useful to call attention to a specific person. In this way it is like including “attention” in your address . This could be useful if you needed to send a thank you card .

I just want to know what are allowed characters in user-name and server parts of email address. This may be oversimplified, maybe email adresses can take other forms, but I don't care. I'm asking about only this simple form: [email protected] (e.g. [email protected]) and allowed characters in both parts.

The Internet standards (Request for Comments) for protocols mandate that component hostname labels may contain only the ASCII letters a through z (in a case-insensitive manner), the digits 0 through 9 , and the hyphen ( - ). The original specification of hostnames in RFC 952 , mandated that labels could not start with a digit or with a hyphen, and must not end with a hyphen. However, a subsequent specification ( RFC 1123 ) permitted hostname labels to start with digits. No other symbols, punctuation characters, or blank spaces are permitted.

To avoid false-positive rejections of actual email addresses in the current and future world, and from anywhere in the world, you need to know at least the high-level concept of RFC 3490 , "Internationalizing Domain Names in Applications (IDNA)". I know folks in US and A often aren't up on this, but it's already in widespread and rapidly increasing use around the world (mainly the non-English dominated parts).

Often abbreviated as c/o, “care of” means through someone or by way of someone. This phrase indicates that something is to be delivered to an addressee where they don’t normally receive correspondence. In practice, it lets the post office know the recipient is not the normal recipient at that street address.
 

Write the recipient’s name on the first line, as you do with most letters. Start the second line with “c/o” followed by the person or company name associated with the address you are using.

It can come in handy when trying to get in touch with someone whose home address you don’t know. It can also be useful to call attention to a specific person. In this way it is like including “attention” in your address . This could be useful if you needed to send a thank you card .

I just want to know what are allowed characters in user-name and server parts of email address. This may be oversimplified, maybe email adresses can take other forms, but I don't care. I'm asking about only this simple form: [email protected] (e.g. [email protected]) and allowed characters in both parts.

The Internet standards (Request for Comments) for protocols mandate that component hostname labels may contain only the ASCII letters a through z (in a case-insensitive manner), the digits 0 through 9 , and the hyphen ( - ). The original specification of hostnames in RFC 952 , mandated that labels could not start with a digit or with a hyphen, and must not end with a hyphen. However, a subsequent specification ( RFC 1123 ) permitted hostname labels to start with digits. No other symbols, punctuation characters, or blank spaces are permitted.

To avoid false-positive rejections of actual email addresses in the current and future world, and from anywhere in the world, you need to know at least the high-level concept of RFC 3490 , "Internationalizing Domain Names in Applications (IDNA)". I know folks in US and A often aren't up on this, but it's already in widespread and rapidly increasing use around the world (mainly the non-English dominated parts).

Is the only way of getting the address of an address in C (opposite to double dereference to have an intermediate variable?

The address-of operator returns an rvalue, and you cannot take the address of an rvalue (see here for an explanation of the differences between rvalues and lvalues).

Therefore, you have to convert it into an lvalue by storing it in a variable, then you can take the address of that variable.

Often abbreviated as c/o, “care of” means through someone or by way of someone. This phrase indicates that something is to be delivered to an addressee where they don’t normally receive correspondence. In practice, it lets the post office know the recipient is not the normal recipient at that street address.
 

Write the recipient’s name on the first line, as you do with most letters. Start the second line with “c/o” followed by the person or company name associated with the address you are using.

It can come in handy when trying to get in touch with someone whose home address you don’t know. It can also be useful to call attention to a specific person. In this way it is like including “attention” in your address . This could be useful if you needed to send a thank you card .

Often abbreviated as c/o, “care of” means through someone or by way of someone. This phrase indicates that something is to be delivered to an addressee where they don’t normally receive correspondence. In practice, it lets the post office know the recipient is not the normal recipient at that street address.
 

Write the recipient’s name on the first line, as you do with most letters. Start the second line with “c/o” followed by the person or company name associated with the address you are using.

It can come in handy when trying to get in touch with someone whose home address you don’t know. It can also be useful to call attention to a specific person. In this way it is like including “attention” in your address . This could be useful if you needed to send a thank you card .

I just want to know what are allowed characters in user-name and server parts of email address. This may be oversimplified, maybe email adresses can take other forms, but I don't care. I'm asking about only this simple form: [email protected] (e.g. [email protected]) and allowed characters in both parts.

The Internet standards (Request for Comments) for protocols mandate that component hostname labels may contain only the ASCII letters a through z (in a case-insensitive manner), the digits 0 through 9 , and the hyphen ( - ). The original specification of hostnames in RFC 952 , mandated that labels could not start with a digit or with a hyphen, and must not end with a hyphen. However, a subsequent specification ( RFC 1123 ) permitted hostname labels to start with digits. No other symbols, punctuation characters, or blank spaces are permitted.

To avoid false-positive rejections of actual email addresses in the current and future world, and from anywhere in the world, you need to know at least the high-level concept of RFC 3490 , "Internationalizing Domain Names in Applications (IDNA)". I know folks in US and A often aren't up on this, but it's already in widespread and rapidly increasing use around the world (mainly the non-English dominated parts).

Is the only way of getting the address of an address in C (opposite to double dereference to have an intermediate variable?

The address-of operator returns an rvalue, and you cannot take the address of an rvalue (see here for an explanation of the differences between rvalues and lvalues).

Therefore, you have to convert it into an lvalue by storing it in a variable, then you can take the address of that variable.

Welcome to WhatIsMyIPAddress.com. Your IP address is something you probably rarely think about, but it's vitally important to your online lifestyle. Without an IP address, you wouldn't be able to get today's weather, check the latest news or look at videos online.

Because without your IP address, websites like whatismyipaddress.com, CNN or ESPN wouldn't know where to send the information you asked for. They wouldn't be able to get it to YOUR computer.

There is lot of misinformation, concern and confusion about IP addresses. Part of our mission is to separate facts from hype and give you helpful information. You can learn more about IP address basics in our article called " IP 101 ".


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