We finde book :

The koren classic tanakh, compact size, flexcover (hebrew edition) - The Koren Classic Tanakh, Ma alot Edition (Hebrew Edition.



I’ve been away from the blog for a while, and I’m planning to come back in the coming weeks with a single focus: reviewing and examining pocket Bibles. Sometime in the last few months I think I crossed a line in my mind; before I thought of myself merely as someone who had a lot of Bibles, all of them to use and serve some purpose; now I am beginning to think of myself as a bona-fide collector, and I’ve decided to take that “collectors” impulse into the realm of pocket/compact Bibles.

Reading from several compact Bibles has been intriguing, and I’m hoping that my reviews can serve two purposes: a) to aid customers in their purchases, so that they can avoid the clunkers and find the gems; a) to perhaps aid publishers, as I make my humble observations concerning what works (and what does not work).

So, for now, I’ll ask for your help: What are some of the best pocket/compact Bibles that you own or know about?  I’d love to know what other Bibliophiles have found.  Any really strong recommendations out there? Or, are there any editions that you’ve found to be real clunkers, not worth considering? Please, do share!

I really enjoyed the drawing style in this book.  The main characters were cute and cartoony and yet the backgrounds were reasonably realistic looking.  It really conveyed the setting (the old west, I guess) effectively.

However, I had a huge problem with the story.  The book felt like it was part 2, but to the best of my knowledge it isn’t.  There just seemed to be huge gaps in the story that were never filled in.  Not to mention, this is supposed to be a children’s story, but we find out (very late in the story) that the childrens’ mother was killed in cold blood–more or less on a whim.  It’s a shocking piece of violence which I suppose little kids can handle but, woah, what the hell, dude?

The story begins with Opie and Ned in a saloon.  They are young kids, Opie is Ned’s older sister–a joke is made about Opie being a weird name for a girl, but sadly, nothing more comes of that.  Opie is holding her own in a game of cards but Ned is bored and keeps interrupting the game as annoying little brother will do.

Judaism claims a historical continuity spanning more than 3,000 years. It is one of the oldest monotheistic religions, [9] and the oldest to survive into the present day. [10] The Hebrews / Israelites were already referred to as “Jews” in later books of the Tanakh such as the Book of Esther, with the term Jews replacing the title “Children of Israel”. [11] Judaism’s texts, traditions and values strongly influenced later Abrahamic religions, including Christianity, Islam and the Baha’i Faith. [12] [13] Many aspects of Judaism have also directly or indirectly influenced secular Western ethics and civil law. [14]

Thus, although there is an esoteric tradition in Judaism (Kabbalah), Rabbinic scholar Max Kadushin has characterized normative Judaism as “normal mysticism”, because it involves every-day personal experiences of God through ways or modes that are common to all Jews. [27] This is played out through the observance of the halakhot and given verbal expression in the Birkat Ha-Mizvot, the short blessings that are spoken every time a positive commandment is to be fulfilled.

Whereas Jewish philosophers often debate whether God is immanent or transcendent, and whether people have free will or their lives are determined, Halakha is a system through which any Jew acts to bring God into the world.

I’ve been away from the blog for a while, and I’m planning to come back in the coming weeks with a single focus: reviewing and examining pocket Bibles. Sometime in the last few months I think I crossed a line in my mind; before I thought of myself merely as someone who had a lot of Bibles, all of them to use and serve some purpose; now I am beginning to think of myself as a bona-fide collector, and I’ve decided to take that “collectors” impulse into the realm of pocket/compact Bibles.

Reading from several compact Bibles has been intriguing, and I’m hoping that my reviews can serve two purposes: a) to aid customers in their purchases, so that they can avoid the clunkers and find the gems; a) to perhaps aid publishers, as I make my humble observations concerning what works (and what does not work).

So, for now, I’ll ask for your help: What are some of the best pocket/compact Bibles that you own or know about?  I’d love to know what other Bibliophiles have found.  Any really strong recommendations out there? Or, are there any editions that you’ve found to be real clunkers, not worth considering? Please, do share!

I’ve been away from the blog for a while, and I’m planning to come back in the coming weeks with a single focus: reviewing and examining pocket Bibles. Sometime in the last few months I think I crossed a line in my mind; before I thought of myself merely as someone who had a lot of Bibles, all of them to use and serve some purpose; now I am beginning to think of myself as a bona-fide collector, and I’ve decided to take that “collectors” impulse into the realm of pocket/compact Bibles.

Reading from several compact Bibles has been intriguing, and I’m hoping that my reviews can serve two purposes: a) to aid customers in their purchases, so that they can avoid the clunkers and find the gems; a) to perhaps aid publishers, as I make my humble observations concerning what works (and what does not work).

So, for now, I’ll ask for your help: What are some of the best pocket/compact Bibles that you own or know about?  I’d love to know what other Bibliophiles have found.  Any really strong recommendations out there? Or, are there any editions that you’ve found to be real clunkers, not worth considering? Please, do share!

I really enjoyed the drawing style in this book.  The main characters were cute and cartoony and yet the backgrounds were reasonably realistic looking.  It really conveyed the setting (the old west, I guess) effectively.

However, I had a huge problem with the story.  The book felt like it was part 2, but to the best of my knowledge it isn’t.  There just seemed to be huge gaps in the story that were never filled in.  Not to mention, this is supposed to be a children’s story, but we find out (very late in the story) that the childrens’ mother was killed in cold blood–more or less on a whim.  It’s a shocking piece of violence which I suppose little kids can handle but, woah, what the hell, dude?

The story begins with Opie and Ned in a saloon.  They are young kids, Opie is Ned’s older sister–a joke is made about Opie being a weird name for a girl, but sadly, nothing more comes of that.  Opie is holding her own in a game of cards but Ned is bored and keeps interrupting the game as annoying little brother will do.


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