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Swedenborg describes creation  as made up of two separate and yet coexisting “worlds”: the natural world and the spiritual world. The natural world includes everything you see around you—the grass, the sky, houses, other people, your own body, and so on. The spiritual world consists of the unseen realities that we do not fully encounter until after death: heaven, hell, and the world of spirits in between.

In the spiritual world, people have bodies, live in houses, enjoy community life, and are surrounded by landscapes are like those of Earth, with familiar plants and animals. However, things work very differently in spiritual reality. Everything there is vivid and much more alive. What we see responds to what we are thinking. We always have all the time we need. Particular individuals are only as near or as far away as our thoughts of them, and thinking of a person or place can actually bring us there.

In short, while the spiritual world might not seem very different from ours at first, Swedenborg describes a realm where the inner state of individuals are reflected in their surroundings and where all life originates from, and is sustained by, the love and wisdom of the Lord.

Swedenborg describes creation  as made up of two separate and yet coexisting “worlds”: the natural world and the spiritual world. The natural world includes everything you see around you—the grass, the sky, houses, other people, your own body, and so on. The spiritual world consists of the unseen realities that we do not fully encounter until after death: heaven, hell, and the world of spirits in between.

In the spiritual world, people have bodies, live in houses, enjoy community life, and are surrounded by landscapes are like those of Earth, with familiar plants and animals. However, things work very differently in spiritual reality. Everything there is vivid and much more alive. What we see responds to what we are thinking. We always have all the time we need. Particular individuals are only as near or as far away as our thoughts of them, and thinking of a person or place can actually bring us there.

In short, while the spiritual world might not seem very different from ours at first, Swedenborg describes a realm where the inner state of individuals are reflected in their surroundings and where all life originates from, and is sustained by, the love and wisdom of the Lord.

Hades ( / ˈ h eɪ d iː z / ; Greek : ᾍδης Háidēs ) was the ancient Greek chthonic god of the underworld , which eventually took his name. [1]

In Greek mythology , Hades was regarded as the oldest son of Cronus and Rhea , although the last son regurgitated by his father . [2] He and his brothers Zeus and Poseidon defeated their father's generation of gods, the Titans , and claimed rulership over the cosmos . Hades received the underworld, Zeus the sky, and Poseidon the sea, with the solid earth—long the province of Gaia —available to all three concurrently. Hades was often portrayed with his three-headed guard dog Cerberus .

The Etruscan god Aita and Roman gods Dis Pater and Orcus were eventually taken as equivalent to the Greek Hades and merged as Pluto , a Latinization of his euphemistic Greek name Plouton . [3]

Swedenborg describes creation  as made up of two separate and yet coexisting “worlds”: the natural world and the spiritual world. The natural world includes everything you see around you—the grass, the sky, houses, other people, your own body, and so on. The spiritual world consists of the unseen realities that we do not fully encounter until after death: heaven, hell, and the world of spirits in between.

In the spiritual world, people have bodies, live in houses, enjoy community life, and are surrounded by landscapes are like those of Earth, with familiar plants and animals. However, things work very differently in spiritual reality. Everything there is vivid and much more alive. What we see responds to what we are thinking. We always have all the time we need. Particular individuals are only as near or as far away as our thoughts of them, and thinking of a person or place can actually bring us there.

In short, while the spiritual world might not seem very different from ours at first, Swedenborg describes a realm where the inner state of individuals are reflected in their surroundings and where all life originates from, and is sustained by, the love and wisdom of the Lord.

Hades ( / ˈ h eɪ d iː z / ; Greek : ᾍδης Háidēs ) was the ancient Greek chthonic god of the underworld , which eventually took his name. [1]

In Greek mythology , Hades was regarded as the oldest son of Cronus and Rhea , although the last son regurgitated by his father . [2] He and his brothers Zeus and Poseidon defeated their father's generation of gods, the Titans , and claimed rulership over the cosmos . Hades received the underworld, Zeus the sky, and Poseidon the sea, with the solid earth—long the province of Gaia —available to all three concurrently. Hades was often portrayed with his three-headed guard dog Cerberus .

The Etruscan god Aita and Roman gods Dis Pater and Orcus were eventually taken as equivalent to the Greek Hades and merged as Pluto , a Latinization of his euphemistic Greek name Plouton . [3]

Liz Moore, author of 2012’s Heft, tackles the early computer age in her new novel, The Unseen World, out July 26. The Unseen World follows a young, home-schooled girl named Ada Sibelius, who goes with her father to the computer science lab he runs every day at Boston Institute of Technology. But when her father’s mind starts deteriorating, a colleague of his takes Ada in — and she’ll spend the next decades of her life trying to figure out her father’s secrets in a virtual universe.

Boston First, it was late August and David was hosting one of his dinners. “Look at the light, Ada,” he said to her, as she stood in the kitchen. The light that day was the color of honey or of a roan horse, any warm organic thing like that, coming through the leaves of the tree outside the window in handsome dapples, lighting parts of the countertop generously, leaving others blue.

This was how Ada Sibelius liked her father: giddy with anticipation, planning and executing some long-awaited event, preparing for a dinner over which he was presiding. David was only selectively social, preferring the company of old friends over new ones, sometimes acting in ways that might be interpreted as brusque or rude; but on occasion he made up his mind to throw a party, and then he took his role as host quite seriously, turning for the evening into a ringmaster, a toastmaster, a mayor.


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