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Prometheus! living in denial - Prometheus (tree) - Wikipedia



Ridley Scott's "Prometheus" is a magnificent science-fiction film, all the more intriguing because it raises questions about the origin of human life and doesn't have the answers. It's in the classic tradition of golden age sci-fi, echoing Scott's " Alien " (1979), but creating a world of its own. I'm a pushover for material like this; it's a seamless blend of story, special effects and pitch-perfect casting, filmed in sane, effective 3-D that doesn't distract.

A scene at the outset shows a world with apparently only one animal being, a pale humanoid who stalks a high ridge surrounded by spectacular scenery. This person eats something that causes painful vomiting and rapid body decay. The vomit is followed into flowing water, where it seems to morph into living cellular structures. Where is this place? Is it Earth? Who is the being, and why is it alone and naked? Is the scene a visualization of the theory that life first arrived on Earth from outer space?

Cut to a human spaceship in the year 2093, qualifying "Prometheus" for a flash-forward spanning more years than the opening of "2001." The trillion-dollar ship Prometheus is en route to a distant world, which seems pointed to in prehistoric cave paintings. There's reason to believe human life may have originated there. It's an Earth-sized moon orbiting a giant planet, and at first it seems a disappointment: no growing things, unbreathable atmosphere. But the crew notices straight lines on the surface, and as we all know, nature makes no straight lines.

Ridley Scott bills Prometheus as a "loose" prequel to Alien. It's the first of three movies that eventually connect directly to the first Alien movie, explore the origins of the Alien creature, and may reveal the details behind the derelict ship on LV-426 and what made it crash. The ship featured in Prometheus is actually not the same wreck seen in the original Alien and Aliens movies.

According to a 2015 IGN interview with Ridley Scott, speaking about the Prometheus sequel: "I'm trying to re-resurrect the beast and let if off the hook for a while because I’m coming back into the back-end of Alien 1. I'm gradually getting to Alien 1."

Most of Prometheus takes place in the last week of the year 2093, between Christmas and New Year's Day (the events on Earth take place in 2089) -- a full 28 years before the events in Alien. 

​In 1964, Donal Rusk Currey killed the oldest tree ever. To this day, there has still never been an older tree discovered. The tree was a Great Basin bristlecone pine, and Currey didn’t meant to kill it. It was an accident, and one he didn’t really understand the ramifications of until he started counting rings.

Basically, Currey got his tree corer stuck in the tree. So stuck that it wouldn’t come out.  An unwitting park ranger helped him by cutting the tree down, to remove the instrument, and later Currey began to count the rings. Eventually, he realized that the tree he had just felled was almost 5,000 years old – the oldest tree ever recorded.

The story is a sad one, but there’s a lot of science in there too. Great bristlecone pines are some of the longest living trees in the world. In the 1950s, this was a shock to people, who always thought that for trees, longevity correlated with size. Bristlecone pines max out at around 20 feet tall—they’re gnarly, little gnomes of trees, nothing like the majestic Redwoods of California. Collectors Weekly explains how they live so long :

Ridley Scott's "Prometheus" is a magnificent science-fiction film, all the more intriguing because it raises questions about the origin of human life and doesn't have the answers. It's in the classic tradition of golden age sci-fi, echoing Scott's " Alien " (1979), but creating a world of its own. I'm a pushover for material like this; it's a seamless blend of story, special effects and pitch-perfect casting, filmed in sane, effective 3-D that doesn't distract.

A scene at the outset shows a world with apparently only one animal being, a pale humanoid who stalks a high ridge surrounded by spectacular scenery. This person eats something that causes painful vomiting and rapid body decay. The vomit is followed into flowing water, where it seems to morph into living cellular structures. Where is this place? Is it Earth? Who is the being, and why is it alone and naked? Is the scene a visualization of the theory that life first arrived on Earth from outer space?

Cut to a human spaceship in the year 2093, qualifying "Prometheus" for a flash-forward spanning more years than the opening of "2001." The trillion-dollar ship Prometheus is en route to a distant world, which seems pointed to in prehistoric cave paintings. There's reason to believe human life may have originated there. It's an Earth-sized moon orbiting a giant planet, and at first it seems a disappointment: no growing things, unbreathable atmosphere. But the crew notices straight lines on the surface, and as we all know, nature makes no straight lines.

Ridley Scott bills Prometheus as a "loose" prequel to Alien. It's the first of three movies that eventually connect directly to the first Alien movie, explore the origins of the Alien creature, and may reveal the details behind the derelict ship on LV-426 and what made it crash. The ship featured in Prometheus is actually not the same wreck seen in the original Alien and Aliens movies.

According to a 2015 IGN interview with Ridley Scott, speaking about the Prometheus sequel: "I'm trying to re-resurrect the beast and let if off the hook for a while because I’m coming back into the back-end of Alien 1. I'm gradually getting to Alien 1."

Most of Prometheus takes place in the last week of the year 2093, between Christmas and New Year's Day (the events on Earth take place in 2089) -- a full 28 years before the events in Alien. 

​In 1964, Donal Rusk Currey killed the oldest tree ever. To this day, there has still never been an older tree discovered. The tree was a Great Basin bristlecone pine, and Currey didn’t meant to kill it. It was an accident, and one he didn’t really understand the ramifications of until he started counting rings.

Basically, Currey got his tree corer stuck in the tree. So stuck that it wouldn’t come out.  An unwitting park ranger helped him by cutting the tree down, to remove the instrument, and later Currey began to count the rings. Eventually, he realized that the tree he had just felled was almost 5,000 years old – the oldest tree ever recorded.

The story is a sad one, but there’s a lot of science in there too. Great bristlecone pines are some of the longest living trees in the world. In the 1950s, this was a shock to people, who always thought that for trees, longevity correlated with size. Bristlecone pines max out at around 20 feet tall—they’re gnarly, little gnomes of trees, nothing like the majestic Redwoods of California. Collectors Weekly explains how they live so long :

Walking along a street in Great Falls, Montana, Prometheus is hit by a driver who falls asleep at the wheel after drinking too much and dies. The next morning, a deputy finds his dead body with the eagle eating his liver and when the deputy goes to call his death in, Prometheus comes back to life and leaves.

The next day, Sam and Dean investigate his death and resurrection, believing him to be a zombie . By that time, Prometheus has died again of a grizzly bear attack and is in the morgue when they arrive. Prometheus awakens and Sam and Dean force him to come with them at gunpoint.

At their motel, Prometheus explains his history and asks if they kill him, to do it permanently as he is tired of the cycle of death and rebirth. That night, while he is sleeping, Artemis attacks him with a dagger capable of permanently killing him, but a confused Prometheus manages to fight her off. When he asks who she is, she tells him that she is his worst nightmare before disappearing. Soon afterwards. Prometheus dies again of a heart attack.

Ridley Scott's "Prometheus" is a magnificent science-fiction film, all the more intriguing because it raises questions about the origin of human life and doesn't have the answers. It's in the classic tradition of golden age sci-fi, echoing Scott's " Alien " (1979), but creating a world of its own. I'm a pushover for material like this; it's a seamless blend of story, special effects and pitch-perfect casting, filmed in sane, effective 3-D that doesn't distract.

A scene at the outset shows a world with apparently only one animal being, a pale humanoid who stalks a high ridge surrounded by spectacular scenery. This person eats something that causes painful vomiting and rapid body decay. The vomit is followed into flowing water, where it seems to morph into living cellular structures. Where is this place? Is it Earth? Who is the being, and why is it alone and naked? Is the scene a visualization of the theory that life first arrived on Earth from outer space?

Cut to a human spaceship in the year 2093, qualifying "Prometheus" for a flash-forward spanning more years than the opening of "2001." The trillion-dollar ship Prometheus is en route to a distant world, which seems pointed to in prehistoric cave paintings. There's reason to believe human life may have originated there. It's an Earth-sized moon orbiting a giant planet, and at first it seems a disappointment: no growing things, unbreathable atmosphere. But the crew notices straight lines on the surface, and as we all know, nature makes no straight lines.

Ridley Scott bills Prometheus as a "loose" prequel to Alien. It's the first of three movies that eventually connect directly to the first Alien movie, explore the origins of the Alien creature, and may reveal the details behind the derelict ship on LV-426 and what made it crash. The ship featured in Prometheus is actually not the same wreck seen in the original Alien and Aliens movies.

According to a 2015 IGN interview with Ridley Scott, speaking about the Prometheus sequel: "I'm trying to re-resurrect the beast and let if off the hook for a while because I’m coming back into the back-end of Alien 1. I'm gradually getting to Alien 1."

Most of Prometheus takes place in the last week of the year 2093, between Christmas and New Year's Day (the events on Earth take place in 2089) -- a full 28 years before the events in Alien. 

​In 1964, Donal Rusk Currey killed the oldest tree ever. To this day, there has still never been an older tree discovered. The tree was a Great Basin bristlecone pine, and Currey didn’t meant to kill it. It was an accident, and one he didn’t really understand the ramifications of until he started counting rings.

Basically, Currey got his tree corer stuck in the tree. So stuck that it wouldn’t come out.  An unwitting park ranger helped him by cutting the tree down, to remove the instrument, and later Currey began to count the rings. Eventually, he realized that the tree he had just felled was almost 5,000 years old – the oldest tree ever recorded.

The story is a sad one, but there’s a lot of science in there too. Great bristlecone pines are some of the longest living trees in the world. In the 1950s, this was a shock to people, who always thought that for trees, longevity correlated with size. Bristlecone pines max out at around 20 feet tall—they’re gnarly, little gnomes of trees, nothing like the majestic Redwoods of California. Collectors Weekly explains how they live so long :

Walking along a street in Great Falls, Montana, Prometheus is hit by a driver who falls asleep at the wheel after drinking too much and dies. The next morning, a deputy finds his dead body with the eagle eating his liver and when the deputy goes to call his death in, Prometheus comes back to life and leaves.

The next day, Sam and Dean investigate his death and resurrection, believing him to be a zombie . By that time, Prometheus has died again of a grizzly bear attack and is in the morgue when they arrive. Prometheus awakens and Sam and Dean force him to come with them at gunpoint.

At their motel, Prometheus explains his history and asks if they kill him, to do it permanently as he is tired of the cycle of death and rebirth. That night, while he is sleeping, Artemis attacks him with a dagger capable of permanently killing him, but a confused Prometheus manages to fight her off. When he asks who she is, she tells him that she is his worst nightmare before disappearing. Soon afterwards. Prometheus dies again of a heart attack.

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Look for a generator that is capable of Automatic Generator Start (AGS) or at least electric start, and doesn’t require constant maintenance. Brands like Kohler, Onan, Honda and Robins-Subaru are the best, in our opinion.

Ridley Scott's "Prometheus" is a magnificent science-fiction film, all the more intriguing because it raises questions about the origin of human life and doesn't have the answers. It's in the classic tradition of golden age sci-fi, echoing Scott's " Alien " (1979), but creating a world of its own. I'm a pushover for material like this; it's a seamless blend of story, special effects and pitch-perfect casting, filmed in sane, effective 3-D that doesn't distract.

A scene at the outset shows a world with apparently only one animal being, a pale humanoid who stalks a high ridge surrounded by spectacular scenery. This person eats something that causes painful vomiting and rapid body decay. The vomit is followed into flowing water, where it seems to morph into living cellular structures. Where is this place? Is it Earth? Who is the being, and why is it alone and naked? Is the scene a visualization of the theory that life first arrived on Earth from outer space?

Cut to a human spaceship in the year 2093, qualifying "Prometheus" for a flash-forward spanning more years than the opening of "2001." The trillion-dollar ship Prometheus is en route to a distant world, which seems pointed to in prehistoric cave paintings. There's reason to believe human life may have originated there. It's an Earth-sized moon orbiting a giant planet, and at first it seems a disappointment: no growing things, unbreathable atmosphere. But the crew notices straight lines on the surface, and as we all know, nature makes no straight lines.

Ridley Scott bills Prometheus as a "loose" prequel to Alien. It's the first of three movies that eventually connect directly to the first Alien movie, explore the origins of the Alien creature, and may reveal the details behind the derelict ship on LV-426 and what made it crash. The ship featured in Prometheus is actually not the same wreck seen in the original Alien and Aliens movies.

According to a 2015 IGN interview with Ridley Scott, speaking about the Prometheus sequel: "I'm trying to re-resurrect the beast and let if off the hook for a while because I’m coming back into the back-end of Alien 1. I'm gradually getting to Alien 1."

Most of Prometheus takes place in the last week of the year 2093, between Christmas and New Year's Day (the events on Earth take place in 2089) -- a full 28 years before the events in Alien. 

Ridley Scott's "Prometheus" is a magnificent science-fiction film, all the more intriguing because it raises questions about the origin of human life and doesn't have the answers. It's in the classic tradition of golden age sci-fi, echoing Scott's " Alien " (1979), but creating a world of its own. I'm a pushover for material like this; it's a seamless blend of story, special effects and pitch-perfect casting, filmed in sane, effective 3-D that doesn't distract.

A scene at the outset shows a world with apparently only one animal being, a pale humanoid who stalks a high ridge surrounded by spectacular scenery. This person eats something that causes painful vomiting and rapid body decay. The vomit is followed into flowing water, where it seems to morph into living cellular structures. Where is this place? Is it Earth? Who is the being, and why is it alone and naked? Is the scene a visualization of the theory that life first arrived on Earth from outer space?

Cut to a human spaceship in the year 2093, qualifying "Prometheus" for a flash-forward spanning more years than the opening of "2001." The trillion-dollar ship Prometheus is en route to a distant world, which seems pointed to in prehistoric cave paintings. There's reason to believe human life may have originated there. It's an Earth-sized moon orbiting a giant planet, and at first it seems a disappointment: no growing things, unbreathable atmosphere. But the crew notices straight lines on the surface, and as we all know, nature makes no straight lines.


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