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Despite reservations the Netherlands remains committed to the BEPS Project and the EU's Anti-Tax Avoidance Directive (ATAD). The Dutch authorities fear that the economy could lose out if the space for tax competition is narrowed around the world. Nevertheless, the government signed the multilateral instrument (MLI) in June 2017 and submitted its reservations to the OECD.

These reservations include the savings clause, the breaking up of contracts which may allow businesses to avoid a permanent establishment and mandatory binding tax arbitration (MBTA). Under the savings clause, states reserve the right to tax their citizens according to their own national rules. The Netherlands has signed up for the MBTA and listed 82 tax treaties it designates as covered tax agreements.

BEPS also brings opportunities for advisers. As a result of the increase in uncertainty, Dutch tax practitioners have seen more demand for compliance and this has been matched by a rise in tax disputes and litigation. More scrutiny means more legal proceedings.

Despite reservations the Netherlands remains committed to the BEPS Project and the EU's Anti-Tax Avoidance Directive (ATAD). The Dutch authorities fear that the economy could lose out if the space for tax competition is narrowed around the world. Nevertheless, the government signed the multilateral instrument (MLI) in June 2017 and submitted its reservations to the OECD.

These reservations include the savings clause, the breaking up of contracts which may allow businesses to avoid a permanent establishment and mandatory binding tax arbitration (MBTA). Under the savings clause, states reserve the right to tax their citizens according to their own national rules. The Netherlands has signed up for the MBTA and listed 82 tax treaties it designates as covered tax agreements.

BEPS also brings opportunities for advisers. As a result of the increase in uncertainty, Dutch tax practitioners have seen more demand for compliance and this has been matched by a rise in tax disputes and litigation. More scrutiny means more legal proceedings.

In 2014, Argentina and the Netherlands — two of the world’s most established soccer powerhouses — met in the semifinals of the World Cup. After 120 scoreless minutes, Argentina prevailed in an agonizing penalty shootout. It’s very unlikely, though, that the Dutch will be able to exact revenge on Argentina during next year’s World Cup in Russia. That’s because the Netherlands most likely won’t be there — and Argentina may not be either.

The Netherlands is on the brink of soccer disaster: To make the 2018 tournament, the Dutch must beat Sweden by 7 goals in their final qualifying game, at home on Tuesday. If they don’t, it will be the fourth time that the Netherlands has failed to qualify for the World Cup since 1982, or the last 10 tournaments.

More than 6,000 miles away in South America, an even bigger crisis is brewing for Argentina, which has won the World Cup twice and made it to the final in 2014 . If Argentina were to fail to qualify for 2018, it would be the first time that the team has missed the tournament in 48 years. But the Argentines have more ways to get in than the Dutch do (although they’re still in deep trouble). Depending on what happens elsewhere , a loss to Ecuador on Tuesday could mean elimination — but, likewise, a win doesn’t guarantee that Lionel Messi’s men will earn a berth in Russia either.

In a potato field near the Netherlands’ border with Belgium, Dutch farmer Jacob van den Borne is seated in the cabin of an immense harvester before an instrument panel worthy of the starship Enterprise.

From his perch 10 feet above the ground, he’s monitoring two drones—a driverless tractor roaming the fields and a quadcopter in the air—that provide detailed readings on soil chemistry, water content, nutrients, and growth, measuring the progress of every plant down to the individual potato. Van den Borne’s production numbers testify to the power of this “precision farming,” as it’s known. The global average yield of potatoes per acre is about nine tons. Van den Borne’s fields reliably produce more than 20.

That copious output is made all the more remarkable by the other side of the balance sheet: inputs. Almost two decades ago, the Dutch made a national commitment to sustainable agriculture under the rallying cry “Twice as much food using half as many resources.” Since 2000, van den Borne and many of his fellow farmers have reduced dependence on water for key crops by as much as 90 percent. They’ve almost completely eliminated the use of chemical pesticides on plants in greenhouses, and since 2009 Dutch poultry and livestock producers have cut their use of antibiotics by as much as 60 percent.

Despite reservations the Netherlands remains committed to the BEPS Project and the EU's Anti-Tax Avoidance Directive (ATAD). The Dutch authorities fear that the economy could lose out if the space for tax competition is narrowed around the world. Nevertheless, the government signed the multilateral instrument (MLI) in June 2017 and submitted its reservations to the OECD.

These reservations include the savings clause, the breaking up of contracts which may allow businesses to avoid a permanent establishment and mandatory binding tax arbitration (MBTA). Under the savings clause, states reserve the right to tax their citizens according to their own national rules. The Netherlands has signed up for the MBTA and listed 82 tax treaties it designates as covered tax agreements.

BEPS also brings opportunities for advisers. As a result of the increase in uncertainty, Dutch tax practitioners have seen more demand for compliance and this has been matched by a rise in tax disputes and litigation. More scrutiny means more legal proceedings.

In 2014, Argentina and the Netherlands — two of the world’s most established soccer powerhouses — met in the semifinals of the World Cup. After 120 scoreless minutes, Argentina prevailed in an agonizing penalty shootout. It’s very unlikely, though, that the Dutch will be able to exact revenge on Argentina during next year’s World Cup in Russia. That’s because the Netherlands most likely won’t be there — and Argentina may not be either.

The Netherlands is on the brink of soccer disaster: To make the 2018 tournament, the Dutch must beat Sweden by 7 goals in their final qualifying game, at home on Tuesday. If they don’t, it will be the fourth time that the Netherlands has failed to qualify for the World Cup since 1982, or the last 10 tournaments.

More than 6,000 miles away in South America, an even bigger crisis is brewing for Argentina, which has won the World Cup twice and made it to the final in 2014 . If Argentina were to fail to qualify for 2018, it would be the first time that the team has missed the tournament in 48 years. But the Argentines have more ways to get in than the Dutch do (although they’re still in deep trouble). Depending on what happens elsewhere , a loss to Ecuador on Tuesday could mean elimination — but, likewise, a win doesn’t guarantee that Lionel Messi’s men will earn a berth in Russia either.