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The guardian and the war (the chronicles of the protector book 3) - Bodies of second world war sailors in Java sea dumped in.



Its readers generally pretend to be outsiders battling an inherently right-wing system, even though many of them are high up in business, the media, or government. It has given its name to the "Guardianista syndrome": wanting to be seen battling the establishment, whilst actually being a member or a beneficiary.

Editorial offices are in London, where staff reside permanently. This has led to most Guardian writers not realising that there is a difference between "London" and "the rest of the United Kingdom".

Originally called The By 'eck it's grim up t'North 'ere in Manchester Guardian, it began life as weekly newspaper in 1821 as The Manchester Hacienda by exiled Spanish Liberals exiled after the Napoleonic Wars. This began the Guardian tradition of taking more interest in people who lived abroad than those who lived at home. It was published every Monday and gained a reputation for supporting outrageously dangerous ideas like votes for the poor and education for women. The newspaper's reputation for 'liberal pontificating' saw that its offices were a regular fire target for the Olde Englande Defence League.

Its readers generally pretend to be outsiders battling an inherently right-wing system, even though many of them are high up in business, the media, or government. It has given its name to the "Guardianista syndrome": wanting to be seen battling the establishment, whilst actually being a member or a beneficiary.

Editorial offices are in London, where staff reside permanently. This has led to most Guardian writers not realising that there is a difference between "London" and "the rest of the United Kingdom".

Originally called The By 'eck it's grim up t'North 'ere in Manchester Guardian, it began life as weekly newspaper in 1821 as The Manchester Hacienda by exiled Spanish Liberals exiled after the Napoleonic Wars. This began the Guardian tradition of taking more interest in people who lived abroad than those who lived at home. It was published every Monday and gained a reputation for supporting outrageously dangerous ideas like votes for the poor and education for women. The newspaper's reputation for 'liberal pontificating' saw that its offices were a regular fire target for the Olde Englande Defence League.

The chief of the general staff, Gen Sir Nicholas Carter, has described Russia as the biggest state-based threat to the UK since the cold war and warned that hostilities could begin a lot sooner than the UK expects.

Carter’s speech on Monday evening at the Royal United Services Institute was the most pointed and expansive portrayal yet of Russia as a hostile state intent on undermining the US-led Nato alliance.

In one of the most hawkish speeches from a senior UK military chief in recent years, Carter said conflict with Russia could begin in an unpredictable way.

Its readers generally pretend to be outsiders battling an inherently right-wing system, even though many of them are high up in business, the media, or government. It has given its name to the "Guardianista syndrome": wanting to be seen battling the establishment, whilst actually being a member or a beneficiary.

Editorial offices are in London, where staff reside permanently. This has led to most Guardian writers not realising that there is a difference between "London" and "the rest of the United Kingdom".

Originally called The By 'eck it's grim up t'North 'ere in Manchester Guardian, it began life as weekly newspaper in 1821 as The Manchester Hacienda by exiled Spanish Liberals exiled after the Napoleonic Wars. This began the Guardian tradition of taking more interest in people who lived abroad than those who lived at home. It was published every Monday and gained a reputation for supporting outrageously dangerous ideas like votes for the poor and education for women. The newspaper's reputation for 'liberal pontificating' saw that its offices were a regular fire target for the Olde Englande Defence League.

The chief of the general staff, Gen Sir Nicholas Carter, has described Russia as the biggest state-based threat to the UK since the cold war and warned that hostilities could begin a lot sooner than the UK expects.

Carter’s speech on Monday evening at the Royal United Services Institute was the most pointed and expansive portrayal yet of Russia as a hostile state intent on undermining the US-led Nato alliance.

In one of the most hawkish speeches from a senior UK military chief in recent years, Carter said conflict with Russia could begin in an unpredictable way.

Despite his campaign promises to end the US's involvement in Iraq, Afghanistan and Syria, it appears Trump is on board with the Pentagon's business model of permanent war.

Smoke rises from an airstrike in the background as residents walk towards the site of another strike that killed several people, in Sana'a, Yemen, September 5, 2015. (Photo: Tyler Hicks / The New York Times)

Yemen is no stranger to conflict. Under the Obama administration , the country has been subject to years of lethal drone strikes, which Washington, for the most part, claims were targeted at al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP). Washington regards AQAP as the most deadly branch of al-Qaeda. However, in practice, these drone strikes have resulted in thousands of civilian deaths. To put this further into perspective, Washington's drone strikes this year have killed more civilians than AQAP has .


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