We finde book :

Manual of dry needling techniques color edition (2) (volume 1) - Dry Needling for Manual Therapists: Points, Techniques and.



Dry needling involves the insertion of non-medicated solid needles at certain points in the body.   (Photo: The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center)

Alex Pierce, 25, is running again after her knee pain was treated with dry needling.   (Photo: The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center)

Dry needling involves the insertion of non-medicated solid needles at certain points in the body.   (Photo: The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center)

Alex Pierce, 25, is running again after her knee pain was treated with dry needling.   (Photo: The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center)

Dry Needling (DN) is an effective treatment for acute and chronic pain.  It can promote healing after injury and improves a  patient’s ability to move with less pain.  DN is a therapeutic treatment that involves inserting a very thin filament needle into a “trigger point” or muscle spasm that refers pain to a specific area of the body.

Muscular spasms and trigger points are common following an injury or due to degenerative processes and act to compress nerves and other surrounding tissues.  Introducing a dry needle into these active trigger points can provide immediate and significant relief of symptoms.

It is a common misconception that dry needling is like acupuncture.  Although the tool we use is similar in that it is a very thin needle, our evaluation process, treatment and goals of the technique are very different from acupuncture.  Our therapists will evaluate your neuromuscular system (nerves and muscles) and treat specific muscle tissue with the overall goal of improving movement.  Our physical therapists will fully evaluate the function of your neuromuscular system to determine what tissues are contributing to your painful limitations and apply the dry needling techniques to improve healing, decrease pain and increase your ability to perform activities without limitations.

Dry needling involves the insertion of non-medicated solid needles at certain points in the body.   (Photo: The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center)

Alex Pierce, 25, is running again after her knee pain was treated with dry needling.   (Photo: The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center)

Dry Needling (DN) is an effective treatment for acute and chronic pain.  It can promote healing after injury and improves a  patient’s ability to move with less pain.  DN is a therapeutic treatment that involves inserting a very thin filament needle into a “trigger point” or muscle spasm that refers pain to a specific area of the body.

Muscular spasms and trigger points are common following an injury or due to degenerative processes and act to compress nerves and other surrounding tissues.  Introducing a dry needle into these active trigger points can provide immediate and significant relief of symptoms.

It is a common misconception that dry needling is like acupuncture.  Although the tool we use is similar in that it is a very thin needle, our evaluation process, treatment and goals of the technique are very different from acupuncture.  Our therapists will evaluate your neuromuscular system (nerves and muscles) and treat specific muscle tissue with the overall goal of improving movement.  Our physical therapists will fully evaluate the function of your neuromuscular system to determine what tissues are contributing to your painful limitations and apply the dry needling techniques to improve healing, decrease pain and increase your ability to perform activities without limitations.

Muscle dysfunction can be the primary or secondary contributing factor to many neuromusculoskeletal conditions. Such conditions would include repetitive stress injuries, muscle tendonitis, neck pain, headaches, knee osteoarthritis, rotator cuff impingement, frozen shoulder, carpal tunnel syndrome, sacroiliac joint dysfunction, sciatica, muscle strains, iliotibial band syndrome, patellofemoral dysfunction, and plantar fasciitis.

Most people do not feel the insertion of the needle. The local twitch response elicits a very brief cramping and/or deep aching sensation. Dry Needling may reproduce symptoms directly in the muscle being treated or may refer to other areas of the body. This is a form of referred pain, which is one of the hallmarks of trigger points. Elicitation of local twitch responses and recognizable referred pain is a good and desirable reaction because it confirms a possible source of dysfunction.

In some cases, decreased pain and improved mobility is immediate. Typically, it may take a few treatment sessions for a lasting positive effect. Again we are trying to cause mechanical, biochemical and neurological changes without any pharmacological means. Therefore, we are looking for a cumulative response to deactivate trigger points, disrupt pain and to restore optimal muscle function.

Dry needling involves the insertion of non-medicated solid needles at certain points in the body.   (Photo: The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center)

Alex Pierce, 25, is running again after her knee pain was treated with dry needling.   (Photo: The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center)

Dry Needling (DN) is an effective treatment for acute and chronic pain.  It can promote healing after injury and improves a  patient’s ability to move with less pain.  DN is a therapeutic treatment that involves inserting a very thin filament needle into a “trigger point” or muscle spasm that refers pain to a specific area of the body.

Muscular spasms and trigger points are common following an injury or due to degenerative processes and act to compress nerves and other surrounding tissues.  Introducing a dry needle into these active trigger points can provide immediate and significant relief of symptoms.

It is a common misconception that dry needling is like acupuncture.  Although the tool we use is similar in that it is a very thin needle, our evaluation process, treatment and goals of the technique are very different from acupuncture.  Our therapists will evaluate your neuromuscular system (nerves and muscles) and treat specific muscle tissue with the overall goal of improving movement.  Our physical therapists will fully evaluate the function of your neuromuscular system to determine what tissues are contributing to your painful limitations and apply the dry needling techniques to improve healing, decrease pain and increase your ability to perform activities without limitations.

Muscle dysfunction can be the primary or secondary contributing factor to many neuromusculoskeletal conditions. Such conditions would include repetitive stress injuries, muscle tendonitis, neck pain, headaches, knee osteoarthritis, rotator cuff impingement, frozen shoulder, carpal tunnel syndrome, sacroiliac joint dysfunction, sciatica, muscle strains, iliotibial band syndrome, patellofemoral dysfunction, and plantar fasciitis.

Most people do not feel the insertion of the needle. The local twitch response elicits a very brief cramping and/or deep aching sensation. Dry Needling may reproduce symptoms directly in the muscle being treated or may refer to other areas of the body. This is a form of referred pain, which is one of the hallmarks of trigger points. Elicitation of local twitch responses and recognizable referred pain is a good and desirable reaction because it confirms a possible source of dysfunction.

In some cases, decreased pain and improved mobility is immediate. Typically, it may take a few treatment sessions for a lasting positive effect. Again we are trying to cause mechanical, biochemical and neurological changes without any pharmacological means. Therefore, we are looking for a cumulative response to deactivate trigger points, disrupt pain and to restore optimal muscle function.

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