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Science fiction stars and horror heroes: interviews with actors, directors, producers and writers of - Science fiction - Wikipedia



Use of Weapons was, arguably, the first novel Iain Banks ever wrote. He had of course written a great deal before it: at least half a million unpublished, unpublishable, but hilarious words. With Use of Weapons (drafted in 1974 but not published until 1990, under his science-fiction-writing name Iain M Banks) he hit his stride and invented the Culture.

This was a galaxy-spanning utopia whose name was chosen for its self-deprecating modesty, rather than something grandiose like the Federation or the Empire. (In that first draft written in 1974, its denizens' equally wry name for themselves was "the aliens", a usage later thankfully dropped.) The Culture was created out of artistic necessity: Iain already had a character in mind – a mercenary, a flawed hero – and thought it would be interesting to send such a character into battle in the service of a genuinely good society, which the Culture was.

The reputation and reception of Iain Banks as a mainstream author may fluctuate in the future. His verve and talent will always be recognised, and his work will always find and enthrall new readers, but tastes change unpredictably as decades pass. But the place of Iain M Banks in science fiction is already assured, and permanent. He was one of our very best, a star whose light will travel a long way, and fall on places not yet built.

Use of Weapons was, arguably, the first novel Iain Banks ever wrote. He had of course written a great deal before it: at least half a million unpublished, unpublishable, but hilarious words. With Use of Weapons (drafted in 1974 but not published until 1990, under his science-fiction-writing name Iain M Banks) he hit his stride and invented the Culture.

This was a galaxy-spanning utopia whose name was chosen for its self-deprecating modesty, rather than something grandiose like the Federation or the Empire. (In that first draft written in 1974, its denizens' equally wry name for themselves was "the aliens", a usage later thankfully dropped.) The Culture was created out of artistic necessity: Iain already had a character in mind – a mercenary, a flawed hero – and thought it would be interesting to send such a character into battle in the service of a genuinely good society, which the Culture was.

The reputation and reception of Iain Banks as a mainstream author may fluctuate in the future. His verve and talent will always be recognised, and his work will always find and enthrall new readers, but tastes change unpredictably as decades pass. But the place of Iain M Banks in science fiction is already assured, and permanent. He was one of our very best, a star whose light will travel a long way, and fall on places not yet built.

Star Trek is one of the most popular science fiction series of all time and loved by people around the world. In its TV shows, movies, novels, comics, and podcasts, future inhabitants of Earth go on quests to the far reaches of the Milky Way Galaxy . They travel across space using advanced technologies like warp drive propulsion systems and artificial gravity , and along the way, explore strange new worlds.

Treknology-type devices fall into several categories, ranging from those that are in the works to ideas whose time may never come based on our current understanding of physics.

Use of Weapons was, arguably, the first novel Iain Banks ever wrote. He had of course written a great deal before it: at least half a million unpublished, unpublishable, but hilarious words. With Use of Weapons (drafted in 1974 but not published until 1990, under his science-fiction-writing name Iain M Banks) he hit his stride and invented the Culture.

This was a galaxy-spanning utopia whose name was chosen for its self-deprecating modesty, rather than something grandiose like the Federation or the Empire. (In that first draft written in 1974, its denizens' equally wry name for themselves was "the aliens", a usage later thankfully dropped.) The Culture was created out of artistic necessity: Iain already had a character in mind – a mercenary, a flawed hero – and thought it would be interesting to send such a character into battle in the service of a genuinely good society, which the Culture was.

The reputation and reception of Iain Banks as a mainstream author may fluctuate in the future. His verve and talent will always be recognised, and his work will always find and enthrall new readers, but tastes change unpredictably as decades pass. But the place of Iain M Banks in science fiction is already assured, and permanent. He was one of our very best, a star whose light will travel a long way, and fall on places not yet built.

Star Trek is one of the most popular science fiction series of all time and loved by people around the world. In its TV shows, movies, novels, comics, and podcasts, future inhabitants of Earth go on quests to the far reaches of the Milky Way Galaxy . They travel across space using advanced technologies like warp drive propulsion systems and artificial gravity , and along the way, explore strange new worlds.

Treknology-type devices fall into several categories, ranging from those that are in the works to ideas whose time may never come based on our current understanding of physics.

This was a virtually impossible task. Put together a list of 50 must-read science fiction books and don’t make anyone angry. Science fiction is the most discussed and argued over genre in literature but it actually goes way beyond books and into film, TV, video games and even toys.

Here are the criteria I used. One book per author, so that was hard on the big three of science fiction – Robert Heinlein , Isaac Asimov and Arthur C Clarke , who each have multiple classic titles to their name. Attempt to show as many sub-genres of science fiction and plot themes as possible. Include early stories that influenced the genre as a whole and launched popular themes, even if those books appear a bit dated today.

I wanted to show the unbelievable breadth of this galactic-sized genre and, of course, I failed because this is just the tip of the spaceberg – there are probably 500 essential science fiction books, not 50.

Use of Weapons was, arguably, the first novel Iain Banks ever wrote. He had of course written a great deal before it: at least half a million unpublished, unpublishable, but hilarious words. With Use of Weapons (drafted in 1974 but not published until 1990, under his science-fiction-writing name Iain M Banks) he hit his stride and invented the Culture.

This was a galaxy-spanning utopia whose name was chosen for its self-deprecating modesty, rather than something grandiose like the Federation or the Empire. (In that first draft written in 1974, its denizens' equally wry name for themselves was "the aliens", a usage later thankfully dropped.) The Culture was created out of artistic necessity: Iain already had a character in mind – a mercenary, a flawed hero – and thought it would be interesting to send such a character into battle in the service of a genuinely good society, which the Culture was.

The reputation and reception of Iain Banks as a mainstream author may fluctuate in the future. His verve and talent will always be recognised, and his work will always find and enthrall new readers, but tastes change unpredictably as decades pass. But the place of Iain M Banks in science fiction is already assured, and permanent. He was one of our very best, a star whose light will travel a long way, and fall on places not yet built.

Star Trek is one of the most popular science fiction series of all time and loved by people around the world. In its TV shows, movies, novels, comics, and podcasts, future inhabitants of Earth go on quests to the far reaches of the Milky Way Galaxy . They travel across space using advanced technologies like warp drive propulsion systems and artificial gravity , and along the way, explore strange new worlds.

Treknology-type devices fall into several categories, ranging from those that are in the works to ideas whose time may never come based on our current understanding of physics.

This was a virtually impossible task. Put together a list of 50 must-read science fiction books and don’t make anyone angry. Science fiction is the most discussed and argued over genre in literature but it actually goes way beyond books and into film, TV, video games and even toys.

Here are the criteria I used. One book per author, so that was hard on the big three of science fiction – Robert Heinlein , Isaac Asimov and Arthur C Clarke , who each have multiple classic titles to their name. Attempt to show as many sub-genres of science fiction and plot themes as possible. Include early stories that influenced the genre as a whole and launched popular themes, even if those books appear a bit dated today.

I wanted to show the unbelievable breadth of this galactic-sized genre and, of course, I failed because this is just the tip of the spaceberg – there are probably 500 essential science fiction books, not 50.

Stories revolving around scientific and technical consistency were written as early as the 1870s with the publication of Jules Verne 's Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea in 1870 and Around the World in Eighty Days in 1873, among other stories. The attention to detail in Verne's work became an inspiration for many future scientists and explorers, although Verne himself denied writing as a scientist or seriously predicting machines and technology of the future.

There is a degree of flexibility in how far from "real science" a story can stray before it leaves the realm of hard SF. [10] Some authors scrupulously avoid such technology as faster-than-light travel, while others accept such notions (sometimes referred to as "enabling devices", since they allow the story to take place) [11] but focus on realistically depicting the worlds that such a technology might make possible. In this view, a story's scientific "hardness" is less a matter of the absolute accuracy of the science content than of the rigor and consistency with which the various ideas and possibilities are worked out. [10]

Readers of "hard SF" often try to find inaccuracies in stories. For example, a group at MIT concluded that the planet Mesklin in Hal Clement 's 1953 novel Mission of Gravity would have had a sharp edge at the equator, and a Florida high-school class calculated that in Larry Niven 's 1970 novel Ringworld the topsoil would have slid into the seas in a few thousand years. [7] The same book featured another inaccuracy: the eponymous Ringworld is not in a stable orbit and would crash into the sun without active stabilization. Niven fixed these errors in his sequel The Ringworld Engineers , and noted them in the foreword .

Use of Weapons was, arguably, the first novel Iain Banks ever wrote. He had of course written a great deal before it: at least half a million unpublished, unpublishable, but hilarious words. With Use of Weapons (drafted in 1974 but not published until 1990, under his science-fiction-writing name Iain M Banks) he hit his stride and invented the Culture.

This was a galaxy-spanning utopia whose name was chosen for its self-deprecating modesty, rather than something grandiose like the Federation or the Empire. (In that first draft written in 1974, its denizens' equally wry name for themselves was "the aliens", a usage later thankfully dropped.) The Culture was created out of artistic necessity: Iain already had a character in mind – a mercenary, a flawed hero – and thought it would be interesting to send such a character into battle in the service of a genuinely good society, which the Culture was.

The reputation and reception of Iain Banks as a mainstream author may fluctuate in the future. His verve and talent will always be recognised, and his work will always find and enthrall new readers, but tastes change unpredictably as decades pass. But the place of Iain M Banks in science fiction is already assured, and permanent. He was one of our very best, a star whose light will travel a long way, and fall on places not yet built.

Star Trek is one of the most popular science fiction series of all time and loved by people around the world. In its TV shows, movies, novels, comics, and podcasts, future inhabitants of Earth go on quests to the far reaches of the Milky Way Galaxy . They travel across space using advanced technologies like warp drive propulsion systems and artificial gravity , and along the way, explore strange new worlds.

Treknology-type devices fall into several categories, ranging from those that are in the works to ideas whose time may never come based on our current understanding of physics.

This was a virtually impossible task. Put together a list of 50 must-read science fiction books and don’t make anyone angry. Science fiction is the most discussed and argued over genre in literature but it actually goes way beyond books and into film, TV, video games and even toys.

Here are the criteria I used. One book per author, so that was hard on the big three of science fiction – Robert Heinlein , Isaac Asimov and Arthur C Clarke , who each have multiple classic titles to their name. Attempt to show as many sub-genres of science fiction and plot themes as possible. Include early stories that influenced the genre as a whole and launched popular themes, even if those books appear a bit dated today.

I wanted to show the unbelievable breadth of this galactic-sized genre and, of course, I failed because this is just the tip of the spaceberg – there are probably 500 essential science fiction books, not 50.

Stories revolving around scientific and technical consistency were written as early as the 1870s with the publication of Jules Verne 's Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea in 1870 and Around the World in Eighty Days in 1873, among other stories. The attention to detail in Verne's work became an inspiration for many future scientists and explorers, although Verne himself denied writing as a scientist or seriously predicting machines and technology of the future.

There is a degree of flexibility in how far from "real science" a story can stray before it leaves the realm of hard SF. [10] Some authors scrupulously avoid such technology as faster-than-light travel, while others accept such notions (sometimes referred to as "enabling devices", since they allow the story to take place) [11] but focus on realistically depicting the worlds that such a technology might make possible. In this view, a story's scientific "hardness" is less a matter of the absolute accuracy of the science content than of the rigor and consistency with which the various ideas and possibilities are worked out. [10]

Readers of "hard SF" often try to find inaccuracies in stories. For example, a group at MIT concluded that the planet Mesklin in Hal Clement 's 1953 novel Mission of Gravity would have had a sharp edge at the equator, and a Florida high-school class calculated that in Larry Niven 's 1970 novel Ringworld the topsoil would have slid into the seas in a few thousand years. [7] The same book featured another inaccuracy: the eponymous Ringworld is not in a stable orbit and would crash into the sun without active stabilization. Niven fixed these errors in his sequel The Ringworld Engineers , and noted them in the foreword .

These lists, updated hourly, contain bestselling items. Here you can discover the best Science Fiction in Amazon Best Sellers, and find the top 100 most popular Amazon Science Fiction. For non-U.S. customers, Kindle content availability and pricing will vary.


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