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Laws of the general assembly of the commonwealth of pennysylvania: passed at the session of 1846, in - Commonly Requested U.S. Laws and Regulations | USAGov



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General will , in political theory, a collectively held will that aims at the common good or common interest. The general will is central to the political thought of the Swiss-born French political philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau and an important concept in modern republican thought. Rousseau distinguishes the general will from the particular and often contradictory wills of individuals and groups. In The Social Contract (1762), Rousseau argues that freedom and authority are not contradictory, since legitimate laws are founded on the general will of the citizens. In obeying the law, the individual citizen is thus only obeying himself as a member of the political community .

While scholars differ on the meaning of this passage, there is wide agreement that Rousseau is concerned with preserving civil liberty and autonomy , not with giving free reign to government. In fact, the concept of the general will also implies a proscription against despotism. For Rousseau, government is only legitimate insofar as it is subordinated to popular sovereignty or, in other words, follows the general will of the people. Government loses all legitimacy the moment it places itself above the law to pursue its own interest as a separate political body.

The concept of the general will had a deep and lasting influence on modern republican thought, particularly in the French tradition. The Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen of 1789 (article 6), a founding document of the current French Constitution, defined law as the expression of the general will.

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Research Programs
Working Groups
Research Disclosure Policy
Employment and Fellowships
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General will , in political theory, a collectively held will that aims at the common good or common interest. The general will is central to the political thought of the Swiss-born French political philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau and an important concept in modern republican thought. Rousseau distinguishes the general will from the particular and often contradictory wills of individuals and groups. In The Social Contract (1762), Rousseau argues that freedom and authority are not contradictory, since legitimate laws are founded on the general will of the citizens. In obeying the law, the individual citizen is thus only obeying himself as a member of the political community .

While scholars differ on the meaning of this passage, there is wide agreement that Rousseau is concerned with preserving civil liberty and autonomy , not with giving free reign to government. In fact, the concept of the general will also implies a proscription against despotism. For Rousseau, government is only legitimate insofar as it is subordinated to popular sovereignty or, in other words, follows the general will of the people. Government loses all legitimacy the moment it places itself above the law to pursue its own interest as a separate political body.

The concept of the general will had a deep and lasting influence on modern republican thought, particularly in the French tradition. The Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen of 1789 (article 6), a founding document of the current French Constitution, defined law as the expression of the general will.

The Laws of Delaware are a compilation of the official acts of each session of the Delaware General Assembly. Each session lasts for two years. After legislation passes the House of Representatives and the Senate, in identical form, it is sent to the Governor. When the legislation is signed by the Governor, it is assigned a chapter number unique to the current volume of the Laws of Delaware .

For example: 75 Del. Law c. 268 refers to House Bill 399 of the 143rd General Assembly. This citation is then incorporated into the end of each section of the Delaware Statutory Code which provides the history of that particular section.

This listing of the Laws of Delaware , beginning in 1935 with the 105th General Assembly is provided by the Division of Research of the Delaware General Assembly, and was compiled with the assistance of the Government Information Center. Please note, due to a numbering issue, there was an adjustment to the General Assembly's and as a result there is no 111th, 112th and 113th. For historical purposes those Chapters of Volumes 11 - 39 (1853-1934) that are cited in the history section of each statute are also online.

The Office of the Attorney General is unable to guarantee the accuracy of this translation and is therefore not liable for any inaccurate information resulting from the translation application tool.

Please consult with a translator for accuracy if you are relying on the translation or are using this site for official business.

The Bureau of Firearms serves the people of California through education, regulation, and enforcement actions regarding the manufacture, sales, ownership, safety training, and transfer of firearms. Bureau of Firearms staff will be leaders in providing firearms expertise and information to law enforcement, legislators, and the general public in a comprehensive program to promote legitimate and responsible firearms possession and use by California residents.

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Employment and Fellowships
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General will , in political theory, a collectively held will that aims at the common good or common interest. The general will is central to the political thought of the Swiss-born French political philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau and an important concept in modern republican thought. Rousseau distinguishes the general will from the particular and often contradictory wills of individuals and groups. In The Social Contract (1762), Rousseau argues that freedom and authority are not contradictory, since legitimate laws are founded on the general will of the citizens. In obeying the law, the individual citizen is thus only obeying himself as a member of the political community .

While scholars differ on the meaning of this passage, there is wide agreement that Rousseau is concerned with preserving civil liberty and autonomy , not with giving free reign to government. In fact, the concept of the general will also implies a proscription against despotism. For Rousseau, government is only legitimate insofar as it is subordinated to popular sovereignty or, in other words, follows the general will of the people. Government loses all legitimacy the moment it places itself above the law to pursue its own interest as a separate political body.

The concept of the general will had a deep and lasting influence on modern republican thought, particularly in the French tradition. The Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen of 1789 (article 6), a founding document of the current French Constitution, defined law as the expression of the general will.

The Laws of Delaware are a compilation of the official acts of each session of the Delaware General Assembly. Each session lasts for two years. After legislation passes the House of Representatives and the Senate, in identical form, it is sent to the Governor. When the legislation is signed by the Governor, it is assigned a chapter number unique to the current volume of the Laws of Delaware .

For example: 75 Del. Law c. 268 refers to House Bill 399 of the 143rd General Assembly. This citation is then incorporated into the end of each section of the Delaware Statutory Code which provides the history of that particular section.

This listing of the Laws of Delaware , beginning in 1935 with the 105th General Assembly is provided by the Division of Research of the Delaware General Assembly, and was compiled with the assistance of the Government Information Center. Please note, due to a numbering issue, there was an adjustment to the General Assembly's and as a result there is no 111th, 112th and 113th. For historical purposes those Chapters of Volumes 11 - 39 (1853-1934) that are cited in the history section of each statute are also online.


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