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Partisan politics, divided government, and the economy political economy of institutions and decision - What Does Partisan Mean? - ThoughtCo



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From French partisan , from Italian partigiano ( “ defender of a party ” ) , from parte ( “ part ” ) . English from the mid-16th century. The sense of "guerilla fighter" is from c. 1690. The adjective in the military sense dates from the early 18th century, in the political sense since 1842.

From Middle French partizaine , partisanne et al., from Italian partigiana , related to Etymology 1 above (apparently because it was seen as a typical weapon of such forces).

partisan ( feminine singular partisane , masculine plural partisans , feminine plural partisanes )

Whether you're a student, an educator, or a lifelong learner, Vocabulary.com can put you on the path to systematic vocabulary improvement.

From French partisan , from Italian partigiano ( “ defender of a party ” ) , from parte ( “ part ” ) . English from the mid-16th century. The sense of "guerilla fighter" is from c. 1690. The adjective in the military sense dates from the early 18th century, in the political sense since 1842.

From Middle French partizaine , partisanne et al., from Italian partigiana , related to Etymology 1 above (apparently because it was seen as a typical weapon of such forces).

partisan ( feminine singular partisane , masculine plural partisans , feminine plural partisanes )

NEW YORK –   A provision that would have freed churches to make political endorsements has been dropped from the Republican tax overhaul, dashing the hopes of a segment of religious conservatives on what has been a key issue to the Trump administration.

Advocacy groups on opposing sides said Friday they expect lawmakers to keep trying to loosen rules over partisanship in the pulpit, even as this latest effort has reached a dead end.

Conservative groups such as the Family Research Council and the Alliance Defending Freedom have for years sought to abolish IRS rules that bar electioneering by houses of worship and other charitable groups. President Donald Trump pressed the fight on the campaign trail and in the White House.

Fox News vs. MSNBC? That was nothing. The early 1800s were known as the “Dark Ages of Partisan Journalism,” says Gil Troy, a history professor at McGill University. Too much talk about Cherokees? Big deal. The fight between Thomas Jefferson and John Adams, in 1800, got so ugly that Abigail Adams despaired that the shenanigans could have “ruined and corrupted the minds and morals of the best people in the world.”

So it went, at a time when the party apparatuses were as ruthless as any super PAC, the newspapers were proud to take sides, and outrageous charges went out in handbills, the precursor to TV ads and direct mail. The flip side: Everybody cared. Election season was “the great national pastime before baseball,” Troy says, filled with carnivals and rallies designed to get out the vote. Voting rates were high, and only started dropping toward the end of the century — at about the same time as a national move to clean elections up and talk more about the issues.

“The American heart itself is divided,” Troy says. “We want a campaign that is suitable for the salon and the seminar room, but we actually respond better to a campaign with mud and blood.”

Whether you're a student, an educator, or a lifelong learner, Vocabulary.com can put you on the path to systematic vocabulary improvement.

From French partisan , from Italian partigiano ( “ defender of a party ” ) , from parte ( “ part ” ) . English from the mid-16th century. The sense of "guerilla fighter" is from c. 1690. The adjective in the military sense dates from the early 18th century, in the political sense since 1842.

From Middle French partizaine , partisanne et al., from Italian partigiana , related to Etymology 1 above (apparently because it was seen as a typical weapon of such forces).

partisan ( feminine singular partisane , masculine plural partisans , feminine plural partisanes )

NEW YORK –   A provision that would have freed churches to make political endorsements has been dropped from the Republican tax overhaul, dashing the hopes of a segment of religious conservatives on what has been a key issue to the Trump administration.

Advocacy groups on opposing sides said Friday they expect lawmakers to keep trying to loosen rules over partisanship in the pulpit, even as this latest effort has reached a dead end.

Conservative groups such as the Family Research Council and the Alliance Defending Freedom have for years sought to abolish IRS rules that bar electioneering by houses of worship and other charitable groups. President Donald Trump pressed the fight on the campaign trail and in the White House.

Fox News vs. MSNBC? That was nothing. The early 1800s were known as the “Dark Ages of Partisan Journalism,” says Gil Troy, a history professor at McGill University. Too much talk about Cherokees? Big deal. The fight between Thomas Jefferson and John Adams, in 1800, got so ugly that Abigail Adams despaired that the shenanigans could have “ruined and corrupted the minds and morals of the best people in the world.”

So it went, at a time when the party apparatuses were as ruthless as any super PAC, the newspapers were proud to take sides, and outrageous charges went out in handbills, the precursor to TV ads and direct mail. The flip side: Everybody cared. Election season was “the great national pastime before baseball,” Troy says, filled with carnivals and rallies designed to get out the vote. Voting rates were high, and only started dropping toward the end of the century — at about the same time as a national move to clean elections up and talk more about the issues.

“The American heart itself is divided,” Troy says. “We want a campaign that is suitable for the salon and the seminar room, but we actually respond better to a campaign with mud and blood.”

When Democrats hold the presidency, unemployment declines more than when the GOP occupies the Oval Office. And when Republican presidents are at the helm, a recent study concludes, stock-markets make larger gains. Both parties, it seems, tailor their economic policies to reward their core supporters. Partisan politics, the study suggests, help fuel America's increasing economic inequality.

The evidence of a growing partisan divide in the U.S. has been hard to ignore during recent elections. So has the reality of the economic disparity between the nation’s richest and poorest citizens. The increasing polarization has even led to calls for greater equality of income and wealth from the highest political offices . But the fact remains that politicians seek to appease their political bases first and foremost, and that can lead to a cycle of macroeconomic policies that disproportionally help, or hurt, only one portion of the population during a party's presidential tenure.

The economic concerns of voters in each party, at least in recent years, have been fairly different. A 2009 Gallup poll shows that during the recession, Republicans were most focused on the growing deficit and the possibility of increasing taxes while Democrats listed unemployment and the lack of health insurance as their primary economic concerns. This differentiation was echoed in a 2014 Pew survey , which showed that Republican voters were, again, most concerned with the budget deficit while Democrats said their primary concern was economic inequality.

Whether you're a student, an educator, or a lifelong learner, Vocabulary.com can put you on the path to systematic vocabulary improvement.

From French partisan , from Italian partigiano ( “ defender of a party ” ) , from parte ( “ part ” ) . English from the mid-16th century. The sense of "guerilla fighter" is from c. 1690. The adjective in the military sense dates from the early 18th century, in the political sense since 1842.

From Middle French partizaine , partisanne et al., from Italian partigiana , related to Etymology 1 above (apparently because it was seen as a typical weapon of such forces).

partisan ( feminine singular partisane , masculine plural partisans , feminine plural partisanes )

NEW YORK –   A provision that would have freed churches to make political endorsements has been dropped from the Republican tax overhaul, dashing the hopes of a segment of religious conservatives on what has been a key issue to the Trump administration.

Advocacy groups on opposing sides said Friday they expect lawmakers to keep trying to loosen rules over partisanship in the pulpit, even as this latest effort has reached a dead end.

Conservative groups such as the Family Research Council and the Alliance Defending Freedom have for years sought to abolish IRS rules that bar electioneering by houses of worship and other charitable groups. President Donald Trump pressed the fight on the campaign trail and in the White House.

Whether you're a student, an educator, or a lifelong learner, Vocabulary.com can put you on the path to systematic vocabulary improvement.


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