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This interdisciplinary Master’s programme is built on the University of Lincoln’s academic and research expertise in the subjects of English, History and Art History.

MA Nineteenth Century Studies is designed to provide a methodologically informed study of 19th Century sources, including texts, objects and images. You will have the opportunity to make use of the historical resources available in the city of Lincoln, including the literary manuscripts and extensive archive materials in the Tennyson archive at the Tennyson Research Centre.

You will have the chance to advance your knowledge of this historically significant period through themed modules which combine literature, history, visual and material culture, museum studies, religious studies, science history and book history.

Nineteenth Century Studies is an interdisciplinary journal published annually by the Nineteenth Century Studies Association. The journal is coedited by David Hanson, Department of English, Southeastern Louisiana University; Jennifer Hayward, Department of English, Wooster College; Kimberly Jo Stern, Department of English, University of North Carolina; and Sarah Wadsworth, Department of English, Marquette University. The Exhibitions Review Editor is Maria Gindhart, Georgia State University. The managing office of the journal is located at Southeastern Louisiana University.

The editorial staff draws on the expertise of the distinguished NCS Editorial Board, and NCSA Officers, Board, and Senior Advisory Council (see Staff and Editorial Board & NCSA Board ). Numerous scholars from the profession at large also give generously of their time.

The journal publishes studies of interest to scholars of the nineteenth century in all humanistic fields. Although our contributors most frequently write on American, British, and Continental topics, we place no geographical limitations on potential contributions. Topics include, but are not limited to, literature, art history, history, music, and the history of science and the social sciences.

The ideology of Separate Spheres rested on a definition of the ‘natural’ characteristics of women and men. Women were considered physically weaker yet morally superior to men, which meant that they were best suited to the domestic sphere. Not only was it their job to counterbalance the moral taint of the public sphere in which their husbands laboured all day, they were also preparing the next generation to carry on this way of life. The fact that women had such great influence at home was used as an argument against giving them the vote.

Girls usually married in their early to mid-20s. Typically, the groom would be five years older. Not only did this reinforce the ‘natural’ hierarchy between the sexes, but it also made sound financial sense. A young man needed to be able to show that he earned enough money to support a wife and any future children before the girl’s father would give his permission. Some unfortunate couples were obliged to endure an engagement lasting decades before they could afford to marry.

If a young man was particularly pious he might manage to stay chaste until he married. Many respectable young men, however, resorted to using prostitutes. All the major cities had red light districts where it was easy to find a woman whom you could pay for sex. Out-of-towners could consult such volumes as Roger Funnyman’s The Swell’s Night Guide through the Metropolis . Unfortunately syphilis and other sexual diseases were rife, and many young men unwittingly passed on the infection to their wives. For those unlucky enough to develop full-blown tertiary syphilis, the result was a painful and lingering death, usually in the mid-40s.

Keynote Speakers: Professor Caroline Arscott (Courtauld Institute of Art, London); Professor Tim Barringer (Yale University); Meaghan Clarke (University of Sussex); Professor Kate Flint (University of Southern California); Professor Michael Hatt (University of Warwick); Professor Jonah Siegel (Rutgers); Alison Smith (Tate Britain)

“She saw no, not saw, but felt through and through a picture; she bestowed upon it all the warmth and richness of a woman’s sympathy; not by any intellectual effort, but by this strength of heart, and this guiding light of sympathy…” (Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Marble Faun , 1860)

This conference will explore the ways in which nineteenth-century authors, artists, sculptors, musicians and composers imagined and represented emotion and how writers and critics conceptualised the emotional aspects of aesthetic response. How did Victorian artists represent feeling and how were these feelings aestheticised? What rhetorical strategies did Victorian writers use to figure aesthetic response? What expressive codes and conventions were familiar to the Victorians? Which nineteenth-century scientific developments affected artistic production and what impact did these have on affective reactions?

This interdisciplinary Master’s programme is built on the University of Lincoln’s academic and research expertise in the subjects of English, History and Art History.

MA Nineteenth Century Studies is designed to provide a methodologically informed study of 19th Century sources, including texts, objects and images. You will have the opportunity to make use of the historical resources available in the city of Lincoln, including the literary manuscripts and extensive archive materials in the Tennyson archive at the Tennyson Research Centre.

You will have the chance to advance your knowledge of this historically significant period through themed modules which combine literature, history, visual and material culture, museum studies, religious studies, science history and book history.

Nineteenth Century Studies is an interdisciplinary journal published annually by the Nineteenth Century Studies Association. The journal is coedited by David Hanson, Department of English, Southeastern Louisiana University; Jennifer Hayward, Department of English, Wooster College; Kimberly Jo Stern, Department of English, University of North Carolina; and Sarah Wadsworth, Department of English, Marquette University. The Exhibitions Review Editor is Maria Gindhart, Georgia State University. The managing office of the journal is located at Southeastern Louisiana University.

The editorial staff draws on the expertise of the distinguished NCS Editorial Board, and NCSA Officers, Board, and Senior Advisory Council (see Staff and Editorial Board & NCSA Board ). Numerous scholars from the profession at large also give generously of their time.

The journal publishes studies of interest to scholars of the nineteenth century in all humanistic fields. Although our contributors most frequently write on American, British, and Continental topics, we place no geographical limitations on potential contributions. Topics include, but are not limited to, literature, art history, history, music, and the history of science and the social sciences.

The ideology of Separate Spheres rested on a definition of the ‘natural’ characteristics of women and men. Women were considered physically weaker yet morally superior to men, which meant that they were best suited to the domestic sphere. Not only was it their job to counterbalance the moral taint of the public sphere in which their husbands laboured all day, they were also preparing the next generation to carry on this way of life. The fact that women had such great influence at home was used as an argument against giving them the vote.

Girls usually married in their early to mid-20s. Typically, the groom would be five years older. Not only did this reinforce the ‘natural’ hierarchy between the sexes, but it also made sound financial sense. A young man needed to be able to show that he earned enough money to support a wife and any future children before the girl’s father would give his permission. Some unfortunate couples were obliged to endure an engagement lasting decades before they could afford to marry.

If a young man was particularly pious he might manage to stay chaste until he married. Many respectable young men, however, resorted to using prostitutes. All the major cities had red light districts where it was easy to find a woman whom you could pay for sex. Out-of-towners could consult such volumes as Roger Funnyman’s The Swell’s Night Guide through the Metropolis . Unfortunately syphilis and other sexual diseases were rife, and many young men unwittingly passed on the infection to their wives. For those unlucky enough to develop full-blown tertiary syphilis, the result was a painful and lingering death, usually in the mid-40s.

Keynote Speakers: Professor Caroline Arscott (Courtauld Institute of Art, London); Professor Tim Barringer (Yale University); Meaghan Clarke (University of Sussex); Professor Kate Flint (University of Southern California); Professor Michael Hatt (University of Warwick); Professor Jonah Siegel (Rutgers); Alison Smith (Tate Britain)

“She saw no, not saw, but felt through and through a picture; she bestowed upon it all the warmth and richness of a woman’s sympathy; not by any intellectual effort, but by this strength of heart, and this guiding light of sympathy…” (Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Marble Faun , 1860)

This conference will explore the ways in which nineteenth-century authors, artists, sculptors, musicians and composers imagined and represented emotion and how writers and critics conceptualised the emotional aspects of aesthetic response. How did Victorian artists represent feeling and how were these feelings aestheticised? What rhetorical strategies did Victorian writers use to figure aesthetic response? What expressive codes and conventions were familiar to the Victorians? Which nineteenth-century scientific developments affected artistic production and what impact did these have on affective reactions?

…we can now find something to muse on in the humble daisy, and something to see on a desolate moor. (Branwell Brontë, ‘Thomas Bewick’)

In this the bicentenary year of Emily Brontë, arguably the most overtly Romantic out of Gaskell or the Brontë siblings, this one-day conference seeks to re-evaluate some of the ways in which these writers responded to, reacted against, or elucidated their Romantic inheritance. It also seeks to compare and contrast how the Brontës and Gaskell responded to Romanticism in their unique ways, foregrounding how their differences in politics, religion and attitudes towards the moral role of literature more generally, influenced their reactions towards and development of Romanticism.

We welcome 250 word abstracts for 20-minute papers from all Brontë and/or Gaskell researchers and enthusiasts. Topics may include, but are certainly not limited to:

This interdisciplinary Master’s programme is built on the University of Lincoln’s academic and research expertise in the subjects of English, History and Art History.

MA Nineteenth Century Studies is designed to provide a methodologically informed study of 19th Century sources, including texts, objects and images. You will have the opportunity to make use of the historical resources available in the city of Lincoln, including the literary manuscripts and extensive archive materials in the Tennyson archive at the Tennyson Research Centre.

You will have the chance to advance your knowledge of this historically significant period through themed modules which combine literature, history, visual and material culture, museum studies, religious studies, science history and book history.

Nineteenth Century Studies is an interdisciplinary journal published annually by the Nineteenth Century Studies Association. The journal is coedited by David Hanson, Department of English, Southeastern Louisiana University; Jennifer Hayward, Department of English, Wooster College; Kimberly Jo Stern, Department of English, University of North Carolina; and Sarah Wadsworth, Department of English, Marquette University. The Exhibitions Review Editor is Maria Gindhart, Georgia State University. The managing office of the journal is located at Southeastern Louisiana University.

The editorial staff draws on the expertise of the distinguished NCS Editorial Board, and NCSA Officers, Board, and Senior Advisory Council (see Staff and Editorial Board & NCSA Board ). Numerous scholars from the profession at large also give generously of their time.

The journal publishes studies of interest to scholars of the nineteenth century in all humanistic fields. Although our contributors most frequently write on American, British, and Continental topics, we place no geographical limitations on potential contributions. Topics include, but are not limited to, literature, art history, history, music, and the history of science and the social sciences.

The ideology of Separate Spheres rested on a definition of the ‘natural’ characteristics of women and men. Women were considered physically weaker yet morally superior to men, which meant that they were best suited to the domestic sphere. Not only was it their job to counterbalance the moral taint of the public sphere in which their husbands laboured all day, they were also preparing the next generation to carry on this way of life. The fact that women had such great influence at home was used as an argument against giving them the vote.

Girls usually married in their early to mid-20s. Typically, the groom would be five years older. Not only did this reinforce the ‘natural’ hierarchy between the sexes, but it also made sound financial sense. A young man needed to be able to show that he earned enough money to support a wife and any future children before the girl’s father would give his permission. Some unfortunate couples were obliged to endure an engagement lasting decades before they could afford to marry.

If a young man was particularly pious he might manage to stay chaste until he married. Many respectable young men, however, resorted to using prostitutes. All the major cities had red light districts where it was easy to find a woman whom you could pay for sex. Out-of-towners could consult such volumes as Roger Funnyman’s The Swell’s Night Guide through the Metropolis . Unfortunately syphilis and other sexual diseases were rife, and many young men unwittingly passed on the infection to their wives. For those unlucky enough to develop full-blown tertiary syphilis, the result was a painful and lingering death, usually in the mid-40s.

This interdisciplinary Master’s programme is built on the University of Lincoln’s academic and research expertise in the subjects of English, History and Art History.

MA Nineteenth Century Studies is designed to provide a methodologically informed study of 19th Century sources, including texts, objects and images. You will have the opportunity to make use of the historical resources available in the city of Lincoln, including the literary manuscripts and extensive archive materials in the Tennyson archive at the Tennyson Research Centre.

You will have the chance to advance your knowledge of this historically significant period through themed modules which combine literature, history, visual and material culture, museum studies, religious studies, science history and book history.

Nineteenth Century Studies is an interdisciplinary journal published annually by the Nineteenth Century Studies Association. The journal is coedited by David Hanson, Department of English, Southeastern Louisiana University; Jennifer Hayward, Department of English, Wooster College; Kimberly Jo Stern, Department of English, University of North Carolina; and Sarah Wadsworth, Department of English, Marquette University. The Exhibitions Review Editor is Maria Gindhart, Georgia State University. The managing office of the journal is located at Southeastern Louisiana University.

The editorial staff draws on the expertise of the distinguished NCS Editorial Board, and NCSA Officers, Board, and Senior Advisory Council (see Staff and Editorial Board & NCSA Board ). Numerous scholars from the profession at large also give generously of their time.

The journal publishes studies of interest to scholars of the nineteenth century in all humanistic fields. Although our contributors most frequently write on American, British, and Continental topics, we place no geographical limitations on potential contributions. Topics include, but are not limited to, literature, art history, history, music, and the history of science and the social sciences.

The ideology of Separate Spheres rested on a definition of the ‘natural’ characteristics of women and men. Women were considered physically weaker yet morally superior to men, which meant that they were best suited to the domestic sphere. Not only was it their job to counterbalance the moral taint of the public sphere in which their husbands laboured all day, they were also preparing the next generation to carry on this way of life. The fact that women had such great influence at home was used as an argument against giving them the vote.

Girls usually married in their early to mid-20s. Typically, the groom would be five years older. Not only did this reinforce the ‘natural’ hierarchy between the sexes, but it also made sound financial sense. A young man needed to be able to show that he earned enough money to support a wife and any future children before the girl’s father would give his permission. Some unfortunate couples were obliged to endure an engagement lasting decades before they could afford to marry.

If a young man was particularly pious he might manage to stay chaste until he married. Many respectable young men, however, resorted to using prostitutes. All the major cities had red light districts where it was easy to find a woman whom you could pay for sex. Out-of-towners could consult such volumes as Roger Funnyman’s The Swell’s Night Guide through the Metropolis . Unfortunately syphilis and other sexual diseases were rife, and many young men unwittingly passed on the infection to their wives. For those unlucky enough to develop full-blown tertiary syphilis, the result was a painful and lingering death, usually in the mid-40s.

Keynote Speakers: Professor Caroline Arscott (Courtauld Institute of Art, London); Professor Tim Barringer (Yale University); Meaghan Clarke (University of Sussex); Professor Kate Flint (University of Southern California); Professor Michael Hatt (University of Warwick); Professor Jonah Siegel (Rutgers); Alison Smith (Tate Britain)

“She saw no, not saw, but felt through and through a picture; she bestowed upon it all the warmth and richness of a woman’s sympathy; not by any intellectual effort, but by this strength of heart, and this guiding light of sympathy…” (Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Marble Faun , 1860)

This conference will explore the ways in which nineteenth-century authors, artists, sculptors, musicians and composers imagined and represented emotion and how writers and critics conceptualised the emotional aspects of aesthetic response. How did Victorian artists represent feeling and how were these feelings aestheticised? What rhetorical strategies did Victorian writers use to figure aesthetic response? What expressive codes and conventions were familiar to the Victorians? Which nineteenth-century scientific developments affected artistic production and what impact did these have on affective reactions?

…we can now find something to muse on in the humble daisy, and something to see on a desolate moor. (Branwell Brontë, ‘Thomas Bewick’)

In this the bicentenary year of Emily Brontë, arguably the most overtly Romantic out of Gaskell or the Brontë siblings, this one-day conference seeks to re-evaluate some of the ways in which these writers responded to, reacted against, or elucidated their Romantic inheritance. It also seeks to compare and contrast how the Brontës and Gaskell responded to Romanticism in their unique ways, foregrounding how their differences in politics, religion and attitudes towards the moral role of literature more generally, influenced their reactions towards and development of Romanticism.

We welcome 250 word abstracts for 20-minute papers from all Brontë and/or Gaskell researchers and enthusiasts. Topics may include, but are certainly not limited to:

During the Congress of Vienna, the four great victors (Austria, France, Russia and the United Kingdom) redrew the map of Europe and attempted to put an end to the period heralded by the French Revolution.

In 1848, the Spring of Nations ended with the failure of liberal forces in Europe. Meanwhile unification of Germany and Italy marked the triumph of nationality.

The annexation of these two regions illustrates how France and Germany interpreted the concept of the ‘nation’.

This interdisciplinary Master’s programme is built on the University of Lincoln’s academic and research expertise in the subjects of English, History and Art History.

MA Nineteenth Century Studies is designed to provide a methodologically informed study of 19th Century sources, including texts, objects and images. You will have the opportunity to make use of the historical resources available in the city of Lincoln, including the literary manuscripts and extensive archive materials in the Tennyson archive at the Tennyson Research Centre.

You will have the chance to advance your knowledge of this historically significant period through themed modules which combine literature, history, visual and material culture, museum studies, religious studies, science history and book history.

This interdisciplinary Master’s programme is built on the University of Lincoln’s academic and research expertise in the subjects of English, History and Art History.

MA Nineteenth Century Studies is designed to provide a methodologically informed study of 19th Century sources, including texts, objects and images. You will have the opportunity to make use of the historical resources available in the city of Lincoln, including the literary manuscripts and extensive archive materials in the Tennyson archive at the Tennyson Research Centre.

You will have the chance to advance your knowledge of this historically significant period through themed modules which combine literature, history, visual and material culture, museum studies, religious studies, science history and book history.

Nineteenth Century Studies is an interdisciplinary journal published annually by the Nineteenth Century Studies Association. The journal is coedited by David Hanson, Department of English, Southeastern Louisiana University; Jennifer Hayward, Department of English, Wooster College; Kimberly Jo Stern, Department of English, University of North Carolina; and Sarah Wadsworth, Department of English, Marquette University. The Exhibitions Review Editor is Maria Gindhart, Georgia State University. The managing office of the journal is located at Southeastern Louisiana University.

The editorial staff draws on the expertise of the distinguished NCS Editorial Board, and NCSA Officers, Board, and Senior Advisory Council (see Staff and Editorial Board & NCSA Board ). Numerous scholars from the profession at large also give generously of their time.

The journal publishes studies of interest to scholars of the nineteenth century in all humanistic fields. Although our contributors most frequently write on American, British, and Continental topics, we place no geographical limitations on potential contributions. Topics include, but are not limited to, literature, art history, history, music, and the history of science and the social sciences.


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