We finde book :

Frank frazetta's moon maid sketch cover - Win a Limited Edition Frank Frazetta Conan the Barbarian.



PLEASE NOTE: We have changed our postage rates. Please disregard the postage total at checkout as we adjust it on our end. The new postage rates are as follows...

U.S. Postage: One issue: $3.00, Two issues: $6.00. Three to Five issues: $7.00 Priority Mail combined shipping.
Canadian Postage: One issue: $8.50, Two issues: $17.00. Three to Five issues: $25.50 International Priority Mail combined combined shipping.
International Customers: Please contact us for a reduced International Postage Rate.

Prices shown below reflect the total with postage included.

PLEASE NOTE: We have changed our postage rates. Please disregard the postage total at checkout as we adjust it on our end. The new postage rates are as follows...

U.S. Postage: One issue: $3.00, Two issues: $6.00. Three to Five issues: $7.00 Priority Mail combined shipping.
Canadian Postage: One issue: $8.50, Two issues: $17.00. Three to Five issues: $25.50 International Priority Mail combined combined shipping.
International Customers: Please contact us for a reduced International Postage Rate.

Prices shown below reflect the total with postage included.

This ad was shot by none other than the famed surf photographer, LeRoy Grannis.  Pretty rad.  I wonder if this ad had any influence on the Spicoli character from Fast Times at Ridgemont High?

Wow….incredible post! I think I was born in the wrong decade. And I love the addition of Spicoli and Cheech and Chong…classic man, classic.

It seemed as if one out of every ten customized vans had Pink Floyd’s
‘Dark Side of the Moon’ album art airbrushed on the side in the seventies. Cheers.

PLEASE NOTE: We have changed our postage rates. Please disregard the postage total at checkout as we adjust it on our end. The new postage rates are as follows...

U.S. Postage: One issue: $3.00, Two issues: $6.00. Three to Five issues: $7.00 Priority Mail combined shipping.
Canadian Postage: One issue: $8.50, Two issues: $17.00. Three to Five issues: $25.50 International Priority Mail combined combined shipping.
International Customers: Please contact us for a reduced International Postage Rate.

Prices shown below reflect the total with postage included.

This ad was shot by none other than the famed surf photographer, LeRoy Grannis.  Pretty rad.  I wonder if this ad had any influence on the Spicoli character from Fast Times at Ridgemont High?

Wow….incredible post! I think I was born in the wrong decade. And I love the addition of Spicoli and Cheech and Chong…classic man, classic.

It seemed as if one out of every ten customized vans had Pink Floyd’s
‘Dark Side of the Moon’ album art airbrushed on the side in the seventies. Cheers.

Born in New Haven, Connecticut , of East European Jewish heritage, Capp was the eldest child of Otto Philip and Matilda (Davidson) Caplin. Capp's parents were both natives of Latvia whose families had migrated to New Haven in the 1880s. "My mother and father had been brought to this country from Russia when they were infants," wrote Capp in 1978. "Their fathers had found that the great promise of America was true — it was no crime to be a Jew." The Caplins were dirt poor, and Capp later recalled stories of his mother going out in the night to sift through ash barrels for reusable bits of coal.

"The secret of how to live without resentment or embarrassment in a world in which I was different from everyone else," Capp philosophically wrote (in Life magazine on May 23, 1960), "was to be indifferent to that difference." [6] It was the prevailing opinion among his friends that Capp's Swiftian satire was, to some degree, a creatively channeled, compensatory response to his disability.

Leaving his new wife with her parents in Amesbury, Massachusetts , he subsequently returned to New York in 1933, in the midst of the Great Depression . "I was 23, I carried a mass of drawings, and I had nearly five dollars in my pocket. People were sleeping in alleys then, willing to work at anything." There he met Ham Fisher , who hired him to ghost on Joe Palooka . During one of Fisher's extended vacations, Capp's Joe Palooka story arc introduced a stupid, coarse, oafish mountaineer named "Big Leviticus," a crude prototype . (Leviticus was actually much closer to Capp's later villains Lem and Luke Scragg, than to the much more appealing and innocent Li'l Abner.)


51tWcWyIwoL