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The language of ghosts - Ghost word - Wikipedia



The English language is a wonderful mess. After centuries where England got invaded by Romans*, Angles, Saxons, Vikings, and Normans, and then the nineteenth century where the English turned around and colonized one quarter of Earth’s landmass, the language has words from all over the world. English speakers seem to love picking up everybody else’s words whenever we come into contact with them.

You, as a writer, can exploit the layers of English to control how your work sounds. You can dial up the register, towards Latin and Greek, to sound cool and cerebral. Or you can dial it back to the German end to sound gutsy and raw.

All the texts I ran through the program are more than half Anglo-Saxon and Germanic. These words make up the core of the English language. Note how Dr. Seuss and Shakespeare run to the Germanic end, the political and scientific texts are more French, and the scientific paper is a whopping eight percent Greek and Latin words.

The English language is a wonderful mess. After centuries where England got invaded by Romans*, Angles, Saxons, Vikings, and Normans, and then the nineteenth century where the English turned around and colonized one quarter of Earth’s landmass, the language has words from all over the world. English speakers seem to love picking up everybody else’s words whenever we come into contact with them.

You, as a writer, can exploit the layers of English to control how your work sounds. You can dial up the register, towards Latin and Greek, to sound cool and cerebral. Or you can dial it back to the German end to sound gutsy and raw.

All the texts I ran through the program are more than half Anglo-Saxon and Germanic. These words make up the core of the English language. Note how Dr. Seuss and Shakespeare run to the Germanic end, the political and scientific texts are more French, and the scientific paper is a whopping eight percent Greek and Latin words.

Shakespeare was not the only dramatist of his day to put ghosts on the stage, yet the apparitions in his plays have effects on the living that are unparalleled elsewhere in Elizabethan and Jacobean drama. In order to understand how he uses ghosts in some of his plays, it is useful to compare him with other playwrights of his time, and to examine contemporary debates about apparitions. When we do so, we will see how dramatically daring Shakespeare was, especially in Hamlet .

Elizabethans knew that, in the classical world, dead souls did return from Hades (the classical land of dead spirits). In Hamlet , Horatio begins the play doubting the existence of the ghost that Barnardo and Marcellus claim to have seen on two previous nights. When he sees the ghost too, he reaches for supernatural precedents from classical literature. Horatio observes that before Julius Caesar’s assassination, ‘the sheeted dead / Did squeak and gibber in the Roman streets’ (1.1.115–16). The reference is characteristic of this bookish young man, who finds a better guide in classical sources than in Christian belief.

O Julius Caesar, thou art mighty yet!
Thy spirit walks abroad, and turns our swords
In our own proper entrails. (5.3.94–96)

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So I FINALLY got my PS4 yesterday, along with 5 games, one of which is CoD. I'm in Moscow so everything was bought here locally. I set up the system in English (US) right away since that's the way I prefer my stuff, yet when I launch CoD it's all in Russian. Switched system language to UK with no luck. On PS3 that's how I changed language in all the games I bought here, it always worked - does it not anymore on PS4? It's hard to believe. I'm not gonna play a game in crippled translation, so any help would be greatly appreciated.

Update 1: Funny thing, it did change when I changed system language to Polish, but stayed Russian when I changed to Spanish. God, don't tell me there is no English included... Update 2: Killzone worked fine in English. I'm guessing this is some screwed version of CoD supporting only RU and Polish languages, like they do on Steam nowadays. Shame. Will have to sell it or something.

The English language is a wonderful mess. After centuries where England got invaded by Romans*, Angles, Saxons, Vikings, and Normans, and then the nineteenth century where the English turned around and colonized one quarter of Earth’s landmass, the language has words from all over the world. English speakers seem to love picking up everybody else’s words whenever we come into contact with them.

You, as a writer, can exploit the layers of English to control how your work sounds. You can dial up the register, towards Latin and Greek, to sound cool and cerebral. Or you can dial it back to the German end to sound gutsy and raw.

All the texts I ran through the program are more than half Anglo-Saxon and Germanic. These words make up the core of the English language. Note how Dr. Seuss and Shakespeare run to the Germanic end, the political and scientific texts are more French, and the scientific paper is a whopping eight percent Greek and Latin words.

Shakespeare was not the only dramatist of his day to put ghosts on the stage, yet the apparitions in his plays have effects on the living that are unparalleled elsewhere in Elizabethan and Jacobean drama. In order to understand how he uses ghosts in some of his plays, it is useful to compare him with other playwrights of his time, and to examine contemporary debates about apparitions. When we do so, we will see how dramatically daring Shakespeare was, especially in Hamlet .

Elizabethans knew that, in the classical world, dead souls did return from Hades (the classical land of dead spirits). In Hamlet , Horatio begins the play doubting the existence of the ghost that Barnardo and Marcellus claim to have seen on two previous nights. When he sees the ghost too, he reaches for supernatural precedents from classical literature. Horatio observes that before Julius Caesar’s assassination, ‘the sheeted dead / Did squeak and gibber in the Roman streets’ (1.1.115–16). The reference is characteristic of this bookish young man, who finds a better guide in classical sources than in Christian belief.

O Julius Caesar, thou art mighty yet!
Thy spirit walks abroad, and turns our swords
In our own proper entrails. (5.3.94–96)


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