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Poison ivy: cycle of life and death - Poison Ivy (character) - Wikipedia



To discuss Poison Ivy is to environmentalism. To discuss patriarchy. To discuss collective archetypes, and evolving narratives. To discuss Golden Age femmes fatale  and black widows. To discuss thrill killers and team ups. To discuss redemption, and defiance, and friendship. To discuss narrative polemics, women in the sciences, the rush of urbanisation, and the male gaze. In short – and frankly this will be the only part of this review that is short – to discuss Ivy is to discuss multitudes.

This singular character romps around this huge swathe of conceptual ground, making what might seem to be a straight-forward review into a surprisingly monumental undertaking. Feeling overwhelmed by our own complex thoughts, and being fully aware we were a fairly narrow pair of perspectives, we put out a call for help. Many of you have seen, and responded – either on Twitter, through the site or via email – to our Poison I(vy)Q call for comment, where we sought to get opinions from the wider audience about how they see Ivy and her future placement.

This call got more responses than anything else we’ve ever put up online. Why? Because fan considerations about who the character is, and what she represents have become a considerable talking point, one which has doubtless prompted (at least in part) DC’s decision to give the character her own six-issue miniseries, the first issue of which debuts today.

Check out our  Patreon  and help support the podcast! Plus, get early access to New 52 Review Podcasts!  Jim and Eric get to talk abou...

Scientific name: Toxicodendron radicans , previously called Rhus radicans .
Kingdom: Plantae – Plants
Division: Magnoliophyta – Flowering plants
Class: Magnoliopsidia - Dicotyledons
Family : Anacardiaceae – Sumac family
Genus: Toxicodendron P. Mill.
Life Cycle: Perennial

Poison Ivy grows as a shrub or vine. Shrubs can grow erect and bushy. The woody vine can trail, straggle, or scramble over rocks. It can climb high due to aerial rootlets on its stems, and attain a 15 cm diameter to its trunk. These climbing vines have fibrous, hair like rootlets that attach to tree bark or other objects and look like fuzzy ropes.

Poison ivy can be found from Nova Scotia to British Columbia , and from Quebec , south to Florida , Texas and Arizona . It is also found in the West Indies and Mexico .

To discuss Poison Ivy is to environmentalism. To discuss patriarchy. To discuss collective archetypes, and evolving narratives. To discuss Golden Age femmes fatale  and black widows. To discuss thrill killers and team ups. To discuss redemption, and defiance, and friendship. To discuss narrative polemics, women in the sciences, the rush of urbanisation, and the male gaze. In short – and frankly this will be the only part of this review that is short – to discuss Ivy is to discuss multitudes.

This singular character romps around this huge swathe of conceptual ground, making what might seem to be a straight-forward review into a surprisingly monumental undertaking. Feeling overwhelmed by our own complex thoughts, and being fully aware we were a fairly narrow pair of perspectives, we put out a call for help. Many of you have seen, and responded – either on Twitter, through the site or via email – to our Poison I(vy)Q call for comment, where we sought to get opinions from the wider audience about how they see Ivy and her future placement.

This call got more responses than anything else we’ve ever put up online. Why? Because fan considerations about who the character is, and what she represents have become a considerable talking point, one which has doubtless prompted (at least in part) DC’s decision to give the character her own six-issue miniseries, the first issue of which debuts today.

To discuss Poison Ivy is to environmentalism. To discuss patriarchy. To discuss collective archetypes, and evolving narratives. To discuss Golden Age femmes fatale  and black widows. To discuss thrill killers and team ups. To discuss redemption, and defiance, and friendship. To discuss narrative polemics, women in the sciences, the rush of urbanisation, and the male gaze. In short – and frankly this will be the only part of this review that is short – to discuss Ivy is to discuss multitudes.

This singular character romps around this huge swathe of conceptual ground, making what might seem to be a straight-forward review into a surprisingly monumental undertaking. Feeling overwhelmed by our own complex thoughts, and being fully aware we were a fairly narrow pair of perspectives, we put out a call for help. Many of you have seen, and responded – either on Twitter, through the site or via email – to our Poison I(vy)Q call for comment, where we sought to get opinions from the wider audience about how they see Ivy and her future placement.

This call got more responses than anything else we’ve ever put up online. Why? Because fan considerations about who the character is, and what she represents have become a considerable talking point, one which has doubtless prompted (at least in part) DC’s decision to give the character her own six-issue miniseries, the first issue of which debuts today.

Check out our  Patreon  and help support the podcast! Plus, get early access to New 52 Review Podcasts!  Jim and Eric get to talk abou...


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