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The christmas carol (the britannia empire) - A Christmas Carol (2009) - IMDb



Welcome to the home page of the Carol for Christmas Competition. We would like to invite Composers of all ages and experience to be inspired to create new and exciting carols for choirs across the nation. There is also the opportunity for composers to write a piece specifically for the internationally acclaimed a cappella ensemble, The King's Singers. All winning entries will be performed in the stunning setting of King's College Chapel, Cambridge, on 18 December 2012 by choirs from across the UK with guest presenter, Tim Lihoreau (presenter, author and creative director of Classic FM).

Entries will be judged by our three internationally renowned judges; Stephen Cleobury (Director of Music, Choir of King's College, Cambridge), John Rutter (composer, conductor and record producer) and David Hurley (The King's Singers). The closing date for entries is 31 August 2012 and the winning entrants will be notified by 01 October 2012. All entrants (composers) will be invited to attend and observe the afternoon event on 18 December 2012 at King's College Chapel.

A Carol for Christmas give composers across the nation a chance to have their carol performed in the stunning setting of King’s College Chapel, Cambridge this December, conducted by Stephen Cleobury, broadcast on Classic FM and published by Edition Peters. Composers of all ages are invited to submit their carol in one of four categories, one of which gives the opportunity to write for the internationally acclaimed GRAMMY ® award winning a cappella ensemble, The King’s Singers.

Welcome to the home page of the Carol for Christmas Competition. We would like to invite Composers of all ages and experience to be inspired to create new and exciting carols for choirs across the nation. There is also the opportunity for composers to write a piece specifically for the internationally acclaimed a cappella ensemble, The King's Singers. All winning entries will be performed in the stunning setting of King's College Chapel, Cambridge, on 18 December 2012 by choirs from across the UK with guest presenter, Tim Lihoreau (presenter, author and creative director of Classic FM).

Entries will be judged by our three internationally renowned judges; Stephen Cleobury (Director of Music, Choir of King's College, Cambridge), John Rutter (composer, conductor and record producer) and David Hurley (The King's Singers). The closing date for entries is 31 August 2012 and the winning entrants will be notified by 01 October 2012. All entrants (composers) will be invited to attend and observe the afternoon event on 18 December 2012 at King's College Chapel.

A Carol for Christmas give composers across the nation a chance to have their carol performed in the stunning setting of King’s College Chapel, Cambridge this December, conducted by Stephen Cleobury, broadcast on Classic FM and published by Edition Peters. Composers of all ages are invited to submit their carol in one of four categories, one of which gives the opportunity to write for the internationally acclaimed GRAMMY ® award winning a cappella ensemble, The King’s Singers.

The film then cuts to Christmas Eve seven years later as the camera zooms all around the town in 3D as everyone is cheerful in the streets. Kids are spinning wheels on sticks, townspeople are buying all sorts of Christmas foods, a butcher working in a basement for a party throws a chunk of beef at some poor kids begging for food, only to have a dog grab it and have the kids chase it, some other kids holding on to the bumper & riding on the back of street cars and carolers in the street singing. However, one lone man walking to work is in no mood for this – Scrooge. Dogs cower away from him, kids start running away upon seeing him and even the carolers stop singing as he passes by them.

Soon after, two kindly gentlemen come into Scrooge’s place of work collecting for the poor. When they ask Ebenezer what he would like to contribute, Scrooge replies, “Nothing”. Mistakenly thinking he wanted to donate anonymously, they ask him again, but Scrooge says he won’t give money to anyone poor, especially since some of the donations were going to prisoners and mentally insane people too for the holidays. When the two men ask him to think again of the poor, Scrooge angrily says that they should all die to decrease the surplus population on the planet. Saddened by Ebenezer’s reply, the two gentlemen leave.

Near closing time, Cratchit asks Scrooge for Christmas Day off tomorrow. Scrooge very reluctantly gives him the time but tells him to come in extra early the following day to make up for the time off. They both then leave & go their separate ways, Ebenezer walking hunched over with his cane and Cratchit happily sliding down an icy hill with some local kids.

A Christmas carol (also called a noël , from the French word meaning "Christmas") is a carol (song or hymn ) whose lyrics are on the theme of Christmas , and which is traditionally sung on Christmas itself or during the surrounding holiday season . Christmas carols may be regarded as a subset of the broader category of Christmas music .

The first known Christmas hymns may be traced to 4th century Rome. Latin hymns such as Veni redemptor gentium , written by Ambrose , Archbishop of Milan , were austere statements of the theological doctrine of the Incarnation in opposition to Arianism . Corde natus ex Parentis ( Of the Father's heart begotten ) by the Spanish poet Prudentius (d. 413) is still sung in some churches today. [1]

In the 9th and 10th centuries, the Christmas "Sequence" or "Prose" was introduced in Northern European monasteries, developing under Bernard of Clairvaux into a sequence of rhymed stanzas . In the 12th century the Parisian monk Adam of St. Victor began to derive music from popular songs, introducing something closer to the traditional Christmas carol.

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Welcome to the home page of the Carol for Christmas Competition. We would like to invite Composers of all ages and experience to be inspired to create new and exciting carols for choirs across the nation. There is also the opportunity for composers to write a piece specifically for the internationally acclaimed a cappella ensemble, The King's Singers. All winning entries will be performed in the stunning setting of King's College Chapel, Cambridge, on 18 December 2012 by choirs from across the UK with guest presenter, Tim Lihoreau (presenter, author and creative director of Classic FM).

Entries will be judged by our three internationally renowned judges; Stephen Cleobury (Director of Music, Choir of King's College, Cambridge), John Rutter (composer, conductor and record producer) and David Hurley (The King's Singers). The closing date for entries is 31 August 2012 and the winning entrants will be notified by 01 October 2012. All entrants (composers) will be invited to attend and observe the afternoon event on 18 December 2012 at King's College Chapel.

A Carol for Christmas give composers across the nation a chance to have their carol performed in the stunning setting of King’s College Chapel, Cambridge this December, conducted by Stephen Cleobury, broadcast on Classic FM and published by Edition Peters. Composers of all ages are invited to submit their carol in one of four categories, one of which gives the opportunity to write for the internationally acclaimed GRAMMY ® award winning a cappella ensemble, The King’s Singers.

The film then cuts to Christmas Eve seven years later as the camera zooms all around the town in 3D as everyone is cheerful in the streets. Kids are spinning wheels on sticks, townspeople are buying all sorts of Christmas foods, a butcher working in a basement for a party throws a chunk of beef at some poor kids begging for food, only to have a dog grab it and have the kids chase it, some other kids holding on to the bumper & riding on the back of street cars and carolers in the street singing. However, one lone man walking to work is in no mood for this – Scrooge. Dogs cower away from him, kids start running away upon seeing him and even the carolers stop singing as he passes by them.

Soon after, two kindly gentlemen come into Scrooge’s place of work collecting for the poor. When they ask Ebenezer what he would like to contribute, Scrooge replies, “Nothing”. Mistakenly thinking he wanted to donate anonymously, they ask him again, but Scrooge says he won’t give money to anyone poor, especially since some of the donations were going to prisoners and mentally insane people too for the holidays. When the two men ask him to think again of the poor, Scrooge angrily says that they should all die to decrease the surplus population on the planet. Saddened by Ebenezer’s reply, the two gentlemen leave.

Near closing time, Cratchit asks Scrooge for Christmas Day off tomorrow. Scrooge very reluctantly gives him the time but tells him to come in extra early the following day to make up for the time off. They both then leave & go their separate ways, Ebenezer walking hunched over with his cane and Cratchit happily sliding down an icy hill with some local kids.

Welcome to the home page of the Carol for Christmas Competition. We would like to invite Composers of all ages and experience to be inspired to create new and exciting carols for choirs across the nation. There is also the opportunity for composers to write a piece specifically for the internationally acclaimed a cappella ensemble, The King's Singers. All winning entries will be performed in the stunning setting of King's College Chapel, Cambridge, on 18 December 2012 by choirs from across the UK with guest presenter, Tim Lihoreau (presenter, author and creative director of Classic FM).

Entries will be judged by our three internationally renowned judges; Stephen Cleobury (Director of Music, Choir of King's College, Cambridge), John Rutter (composer, conductor and record producer) and David Hurley (The King's Singers). The closing date for entries is 31 August 2012 and the winning entrants will be notified by 01 October 2012. All entrants (composers) will be invited to attend and observe the afternoon event on 18 December 2012 at King's College Chapel.

A Carol for Christmas give composers across the nation a chance to have their carol performed in the stunning setting of King’s College Chapel, Cambridge this December, conducted by Stephen Cleobury, broadcast on Classic FM and published by Edition Peters. Composers of all ages are invited to submit their carol in one of four categories, one of which gives the opportunity to write for the internationally acclaimed GRAMMY ® award winning a cappella ensemble, The King’s Singers.

The film then cuts to Christmas Eve seven years later as the camera zooms all around the town in 3D as everyone is cheerful in the streets. Kids are spinning wheels on sticks, townspeople are buying all sorts of Christmas foods, a butcher working in a basement for a party throws a chunk of beef at some poor kids begging for food, only to have a dog grab it and have the kids chase it, some other kids holding on to the bumper & riding on the back of street cars and carolers in the street singing. However, one lone man walking to work is in no mood for this – Scrooge. Dogs cower away from him, kids start running away upon seeing him and even the carolers stop singing as he passes by them.

Soon after, two kindly gentlemen come into Scrooge’s place of work collecting for the poor. When they ask Ebenezer what he would like to contribute, Scrooge replies, “Nothing”. Mistakenly thinking he wanted to donate anonymously, they ask him again, but Scrooge says he won’t give money to anyone poor, especially since some of the donations were going to prisoners and mentally insane people too for the holidays. When the two men ask him to think again of the poor, Scrooge angrily says that they should all die to decrease the surplus population on the planet. Saddened by Ebenezer’s reply, the two gentlemen leave.

Near closing time, Cratchit asks Scrooge for Christmas Day off tomorrow. Scrooge very reluctantly gives him the time but tells him to come in extra early the following day to make up for the time off. They both then leave & go their separate ways, Ebenezer walking hunched over with his cane and Cratchit happily sliding down an icy hill with some local kids.

A Christmas carol (also called a noël , from the French word meaning "Christmas") is a carol (song or hymn ) whose lyrics are on the theme of Christmas , and which is traditionally sung on Christmas itself or during the surrounding holiday season . Christmas carols may be regarded as a subset of the broader category of Christmas music .

The first known Christmas hymns may be traced to 4th century Rome. Latin hymns such as Veni redemptor gentium , written by Ambrose , Archbishop of Milan , were austere statements of the theological doctrine of the Incarnation in opposition to Arianism . Corde natus ex Parentis ( Of the Father's heart begotten ) by the Spanish poet Prudentius (d. 413) is still sung in some churches today. [1]

In the 9th and 10th centuries, the Christmas "Sequence" or "Prose" was introduced in Northern European monasteries, developing under Bernard of Clairvaux into a sequence of rhymed stanzas . In the 12th century the Parisian monk Adam of St. Victor began to derive music from popular songs, introducing something closer to the traditional Christmas carol.


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