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The archer's paradox - the travis fletcher chronicles - The Archer s Paradox in SLOW MOTION - Smarter Every Day 136



Ever seen an arrow shot from a longbow fly on a high speed camera? You will notice that the arrow is not actually flying perfectly straight but actually vibrating in the air as it travels to the target. Why is that? Shouldn’t the arrow be straight in flight to guide it toward the target? The answer is actually, no.

The arrow has to bend to make it to the target. And the reason is the Archer’s Paradox. How does the arrow get to the target around the longbow since the bow is between the target and the arrow?

In this video from Smarter Every Day , Dustin, with the help of exhibition archer Byron Ferguson, explains to us the Archer’s Paradox and how it solves itself.

There should be a boom in this wonderous and deliciously roguish art given recent TV programming  and RPG rogue and / or ranger enthusiasts should start their larceny and / or geekiness glands pumping.

That’s right, beloved reader, today your friendly neighbourhood Rogue Advisor will be taking you through kinesiological attribute enhancement for the noblest and most dextrous form of marksmanship.

So what makes a good archer? The same mighty stuff as any other athlete; firstly knowledge in one’s chosen art, then the discipline to apply the know how, followed by the hard work to see it all through to fruition.

Cloudflare Ray ID: 3faaa46caa288f03 • Your IP : 62.109.12.231 • Performance & security by Cloudflare

The archer's paradox is the phenomenon of an arrow traveling in the direction it is pointed at full draw, when it seems that the arrow would have to pass through the starting position it was in before being drawn, where it was pointed to the side of the target. The bending of the arrow when released is the explanation for why the paradox occurs and should not be confused with the paradox itself. Flexing of the arrow when shot from a modern 'centre shot' bow is still present and is caused by a variety of factors, mainly the way the string is deflected from the fingers as the arrow is released.

The term was first used by E.J. Rendtroff in 1913, [1] and as understanding was gained about the arrow flexing out of the way of the bow as it is shot (as first filmed by Clarence Hickman ) [2] [3] and then experiencing oscillating back-and-forth bending as it travels toward the target, [4] this dynamic flexing has incorrectly become a common usage of the term, causing misunderstanding by those only familiar with modern target bows, which often have risers with an eccentrically cutout "arrow window" and being "centre shot" do not actually show any paradoxical behaviour as the arrow is always pointing visually along its line of flight. [5] [6] [7]

The primary unit of measurement for spine is deflection in thousandths of an inch (a deflection of 500 equals 0.500 inches) Deflection is sometimes converted to pounds of bow weight by dividing 26 by the deflection in inches. (26 divided by 0.500" equals a spine of 52 pounds.) [23]

Ever seen an arrow shot from a longbow fly on a high speed camera? You will notice that the arrow is not actually flying perfectly straight but actually vibrating in the air as it travels to the target. Why is that? Shouldn’t the arrow be straight in flight to guide it toward the target? The answer is actually, no.

The arrow has to bend to make it to the target. And the reason is the Archer’s Paradox. How does the arrow get to the target around the longbow since the bow is between the target and the arrow?

In this video from Smarter Every Day , Dustin, with the help of exhibition archer Byron Ferguson, explains to us the Archer’s Paradox and how it solves itself.

Ever seen an arrow shot from a longbow fly on a high speed camera? You will notice that the arrow is not actually flying perfectly straight but actually vibrating in the air as it travels to the target. Why is that? Shouldn’t the arrow be straight in flight to guide it toward the target? The answer is actually, no.

The arrow has to bend to make it to the target. And the reason is the Archer’s Paradox. How does the arrow get to the target around the longbow since the bow is between the target and the arrow?

In this video from Smarter Every Day , Dustin, with the help of exhibition archer Byron Ferguson, explains to us the Archer’s Paradox and how it solves itself.

There should be a boom in this wonderous and deliciously roguish art given recent TV programming  and RPG rogue and / or ranger enthusiasts should start their larceny and / or geekiness glands pumping.

That’s right, beloved reader, today your friendly neighbourhood Rogue Advisor will be taking you through kinesiological attribute enhancement for the noblest and most dextrous form of marksmanship.

So what makes a good archer? The same mighty stuff as any other athlete; firstly knowledge in one’s chosen art, then the discipline to apply the know how, followed by the hard work to see it all through to fruition.

Cloudflare Ray ID: 3faaa46caa288f03 • Your IP : 62.109.12.231 • Performance & security by Cloudflare

Ever seen an arrow shot from a longbow fly on a high speed camera? You will notice that the arrow is not actually flying perfectly straight but actually vibrating in the air as it travels to the target. Why is that? Shouldn’t the arrow be straight in flight to guide it toward the target? The answer is actually, no.

The arrow has to bend to make it to the target. And the reason is the Archer’s Paradox. How does the arrow get to the target around the longbow since the bow is between the target and the arrow?

In this video from Smarter Every Day , Dustin, with the help of exhibition archer Byron Ferguson, explains to us the Archer’s Paradox and how it solves itself.

There should be a boom in this wonderous and deliciously roguish art given recent TV programming  and RPG rogue and / or ranger enthusiasts should start their larceny and / or geekiness glands pumping.

That’s right, beloved reader, today your friendly neighbourhood Rogue Advisor will be taking you through kinesiological attribute enhancement for the noblest and most dextrous form of marksmanship.

So what makes a good archer? The same mighty stuff as any other athlete; firstly knowledge in one’s chosen art, then the discipline to apply the know how, followed by the hard work to see it all through to fruition.


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