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La science-fiction francaise au xxe siecle (1900-1968). essai de socio-poetique d'un genre en emergen - Noam Chomsky: The Singularity is Science Fiction! - YouTube



In spring 2013, Executive Director Greg Viggiano began speaking with people about creating a museum for science fiction in Washington, DC. The response has been very enthusiastic. Greg quickly found science fiction fans of all stripes that were willing to share their professional talents and time to move the project forward.

Within six short months, a diverse team of 38 volunteers has accomplished key first milestones and worked on a long-term plan for making the museum a reality—making significant progress on everything from curatorial aspects such as gallery design and visitor experience to the non-profit management areas of development, project management, education, information technology, public relations, marketing, finance, accounting, and legal compliance.

We are unified by a shared vision. We want to build a museum, an experience that does justice to the breadth and richness of science fiction history, where we preserve that history in perpetuity and inspire visitors to embrace the genre and its ideas. As a first step, we are developing a 3,000-square-foot preview museum where we can test exhibit concepts and new interactive technologies to share a real-time look into this grassroots effort. We have begun our site selection process. We expect to open the full-scale facility within 24 to 36 months.

The following 186 pages are in this category, out of 186 total. This list may not reflect recent changes ( learn more ).

*There’s not a lot of science fiction around these days, so pretty soon science will have to put up with being influenced by paranormal romance.

*I never minded that working scientists were influenced by science fiction, but I was always impressed by what bad science fiction scientists liked. It was usually junk that they had read back when they were 14, before they had to knuckle down and earn a doctorate.

Finally, the speculative mod. This modified form of science fiction appears frequently in scientific writing as a way of discussing possible futures and extrapolations of current research. As historians and cultural theorists of science, we are becoming increasingly attentive to the powerful role that scientific speculation, technological forecasting, and promissory futures play in the development of science and to how futurological narratives and road maps function as scripts in the everyday routine of laboratory protocols.21

In spring 2013, Executive Director Greg Viggiano began speaking with people about creating a museum for science fiction in Washington, DC. The response has been very enthusiastic. Greg quickly found science fiction fans of all stripes that were willing to share their professional talents and time to move the project forward.

Within six short months, a diverse team of 38 volunteers has accomplished key first milestones and worked on a long-term plan for making the museum a reality—making significant progress on everything from curatorial aspects such as gallery design and visitor experience to the non-profit management areas of development, project management, education, information technology, public relations, marketing, finance, accounting, and legal compliance.

We are unified by a shared vision. We want to build a museum, an experience that does justice to the breadth and richness of science fiction history, where we preserve that history in perpetuity and inspire visitors to embrace the genre and its ideas. As a first step, we are developing a 3,000-square-foot preview museum where we can test exhibit concepts and new interactive technologies to share a real-time look into this grassroots effort. We have begun our site selection process. We expect to open the full-scale facility within 24 to 36 months.

The following 186 pages are in this category, out of 186 total. This list may not reflect recent changes ( learn more ).

In spring 2013, Executive Director Greg Viggiano began speaking with people about creating a museum for science fiction in Washington, DC. The response has been very enthusiastic. Greg quickly found science fiction fans of all stripes that were willing to share their professional talents and time to move the project forward.

Within six short months, a diverse team of 38 volunteers has accomplished key first milestones and worked on a long-term plan for making the museum a reality—making significant progress on everything from curatorial aspects such as gallery design and visitor experience to the non-profit management areas of development, project management, education, information technology, public relations, marketing, finance, accounting, and legal compliance.

We are unified by a shared vision. We want to build a museum, an experience that does justice to the breadth and richness of science fiction history, where we preserve that history in perpetuity and inspire visitors to embrace the genre and its ideas. As a first step, we are developing a 3,000-square-foot preview museum where we can test exhibit concepts and new interactive technologies to share a real-time look into this grassroots effort. We have begun our site selection process. We expect to open the full-scale facility within 24 to 36 months.


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