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Batman classic: the penguin's arctic adventure by donald lemke (2014-12-23) - Batman™ Classic TV Series – Batcave - 76052 | DC Comics.



Ostensibly a crime series , the style of the show was in fact campy and tongue-in-cheek. It was a true situation comedy, in that situations were exaggerated and were generally played for laughs. This increased as the seasons progressed, with the addition of ever greater absurdity. The characters, however, always took the absurd situations extremely seriously – which added to the comedy.

According to Adam West's memoir, Back to the Batcave , his first exposure to the series concept was through reading a sample script in which Batman enters a nightclub in his complete costume and requests a booth near the wall, as he "shouldn't wish to attract attention". It was the scrupulously formal dialogue, and the way that Batman earnestly believed he could avoid standing out while wearing a skintight blue-and-grey costume, that convinced West of the character's comic potential.

In the early 1960s, Ed Graham Productions optioned the television rights to the comic strip Batman and planned a straightforward juvenile adventure show, much like Adventures of Superman and The Lone Ranger , to air on CBS on Saturday mornings.

Though the Batman and Harley Quinn animated movie and its tie-in comics are brand new, everything about them, from their visual aesthetic to the tone of their dialogue, feels as if they were plucked right out of Batman: The Animated Series.

That fact alone made at least the first issue of the comics series fun to dive into from the beginning, but Batman and Harley Quinn really stands out in the grander scheme of Harley-centric stories by blending Harley’s classic aesthetic with a voice much more in line with the person she is today.

When we first met Harley 25 years ago, she was that rare sort of new-to-the-franchise character whose presence and energy almost immediately felt like foundational parts of the Batman mythos. Though she was introduced as such, Harley’s always been so much more than the Joker’s accomplice-cum-love-interest.

Ostensibly a crime series , the style of the show was in fact campy and tongue-in-cheek. It was a true situation comedy, in that situations were exaggerated and were generally played for laughs. This increased as the seasons progressed, with the addition of ever greater absurdity. The characters, however, always took the absurd situations extremely seriously – which added to the comedy.

According to Adam West's memoir, Back to the Batcave , his first exposure to the series concept was through reading a sample script in which Batman enters a nightclub in his complete costume and requests a booth near the wall, as he "shouldn't wish to attract attention". It was the scrupulously formal dialogue, and the way that Batman earnestly believed he could avoid standing out while wearing a skintight blue-and-grey costume, that convinced West of the character's comic potential.

In the early 1960s, Ed Graham Productions optioned the television rights to the comic strip Batman and planned a straightforward juvenile adventure show, much like Adventures of Superman and The Lone Ranger , to air on CBS on Saturday mornings.


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