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The national gazetteer, vol. 2: a topographical dictionary of the british islands; compiled from the - THE NATIONAL GAZETTEER OF THE - USGS



A gazetteer is a geographical dictionary or directory used in conjunction with a map or atlas . [1] It typically contains information concerning the geographical makeup, social statistics and physical features of a country, region, or continent. Content of a gazetteer can include a subject's location, dimensions of peaks and waterways, population , gross domestic product and literacy rate. This information is generally divided into topics with entries listed in alphabetical order.

Ancient Greek gazetteers are known to have existed since the Hellenistic era. The first known Chinese gazetteer was released by the first century, and with the age of print media in China by the ninth century , the Chinese gentry became invested in producing gazetteers for their local areas as a source of information as well as local pride. The geographer Stephanus of Byzantium wrote a geographical dictionary (which currently has missing parts) in the sixth century which influenced later European compilers. Modern gazetteers can be found in reference sections of most libraries as well as on the internet.

Since the 18th century, the word "gazetteer" has been used interchangeably to define either its traditional meaning (i.e., a geographical dictionary or directory) or a daily newspaper , such as the London Gazetteer . [3] [4]

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You may also view this DjVu file in your web browser with a browser plugin/add-on, or use a desktop DjVu viewer for your operating system. You can choose suitable software from this list . See Help:DjVu for more information.

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A gazetteer is a geographical dictionary or directory used in conjunction with a map or atlas . [1] It typically contains information concerning the geographical makeup, social statistics and physical features of a country, region, or continent. Content of a gazetteer can include a subject's location, dimensions of peaks and waterways, population , gross domestic product and literacy rate. This information is generally divided into topics with entries listed in alphabetical order.

Ancient Greek gazetteers are known to have existed since the Hellenistic era. The first known Chinese gazetteer was released by the first century, and with the age of print media in China by the ninth century , the Chinese gentry became invested in producing gazetteers for their local areas as a source of information as well as local pride. The geographer Stephanus of Byzantium wrote a geographical dictionary (which currently has missing parts) in the sixth century which influenced later European compilers. Modern gazetteers can be found in reference sections of most libraries as well as on the internet.

Since the 18th century, the word "gazetteer" has been used interchangeably to define either its traditional meaning (i.e., a geographical dictionary or directory) or a daily newspaper , such as the London Gazetteer . [3] [4]

You may view this DjVu file here online. If the document is multi-page you may use the controls on the right of the image to change pages.

You may also view this DjVu file in your web browser with a browser plugin/add-on, or use a desktop DjVu viewer for your operating system. You can choose suitable software from this list . See Help:DjVu for more information.

català  | Deutsch  | Deutsch (Sie-Form)‎  | English  | Esperanto  | español  | français  | magyar  | italiano  | македонски  | Nederlands  | português  | русский  | sicilianu  | українська  | Tiếng Việt  | 中文  | 中文(简体)‎  | 中文(繁體)‎  | +/−

A gazetteer is a geographical dictionary or directory used in conjunction with a map or atlas . [1] It typically contains information concerning the geographical makeup, social statistics and physical features of a country, region, or continent. Content of a gazetteer can include a subject's location, dimensions of peaks and waterways, population , gross domestic product and literacy rate. This information is generally divided into topics with entries listed in alphabetical order.

Ancient Greek gazetteers are known to have existed since the Hellenistic era. The first known Chinese gazetteer was released by the first century, and with the age of print media in China by the ninth century , the Chinese gentry became invested in producing gazetteers for their local areas as a source of information as well as local pride. The geographer Stephanus of Byzantium wrote a geographical dictionary (which currently has missing parts) in the sixth century which influenced later European compilers. Modern gazetteers can be found in reference sections of most libraries as well as on the internet.

Since the 18th century, the word "gazetteer" has been used interchangeably to define either its traditional meaning (i.e., a geographical dictionary or directory) or a daily newspaper , such as the London Gazetteer . [3] [4]

A gazetteer is a geographical dictionary or directory used in conjunction with a map or atlas . [1] It typically contains information concerning the geographical makeup, social statistics and physical features of a country, region, or continent. Content of a gazetteer can include a subject's location, dimensions of peaks and waterways, population , gross domestic product and literacy rate. This information is generally divided into topics with entries listed in alphabetical order.

Ancient Greek gazetteers are known to have existed since the Hellenistic era. The first known Chinese gazetteer was released by the first century, and with the age of print media in China by the ninth century , the Chinese gentry became invested in producing gazetteers for their local areas as a source of information as well as local pride. The geographer Stephanus of Byzantium wrote a geographical dictionary (which currently has missing parts) in the sixth century which influenced later European compilers. Modern gazetteers can be found in reference sections of most libraries as well as on the internet.

Since the 18th century, the word "gazetteer" has been used interchangeably to define either its traditional meaning (i.e., a geographical dictionary or directory) or a daily newspaper , such as the London Gazetteer . [3] [4]

You may view this DjVu file here online. If the document is multi-page you may use the controls on the right of the image to change pages.

You may also view this DjVu file in your web browser with a browser plugin/add-on, or use a desktop DjVu viewer for your operating system. You can choose suitable software from this list . See Help:DjVu for more information.

català  | Deutsch  | Deutsch (Sie-Form)‎  | English  | Esperanto  | español  | français  | magyar  | italiano  | македонски  | Nederlands  | português  | русский  | sicilianu  | українська  | Tiếng Việt  | 中文  | 中文(简体)‎  | 中文(繁體)‎  | +/−

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Atherstone, a market town and formerly a chapelry in the parish of Mancetter, but now a district parish in the Atherstone division of the hundred of Hemlingford, in the county of Warwick, 23 miles to the North of Warwick, and 102 miles from London by the Trent Valley branch of the London and North Western railway, on which it is a station.

It is situated in a pleasant and highly cultivated country, near the western bank of the river Anker, close to the borders of Leicestershire. The Roman road, Watling Street, passes through this place, and a little to the west is the Coventry and Fazeley canal.

It is a place of considerable antiquity, and had a Saxon origin, its original name being Ardeston, the “town in Arden”, or in the great wood. Its name in Domesday Book is written Aderestone. At the Conquest the manor was the property of the Countess Godiva, and was granted to Hugh Lupus, Earl of Chester. It afterwards passed through the hands of the Earls of Stafford and Warwick, till, in 1464, it became the property of the Carthusian monks of Mountgrace, in Yorkshire, and subsequently was given to the free chapel of St. George, at Windsor.


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