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Archibald constable and his literary correspondents, vol. 3 of 3: a memorial by his son (classic repr - Constable & Robinson - Wikipedia



In 1788 Archibald was apprenticed to Peter Hill, an Edinburgh bookseller, but in 1795 he started in business for himself as a dealer in rare books. He bought the Scots Magazine in 1801, and John Leyden , the orientalist, became its editor. In 1800 Constable began the Farmer's Magazine , and in November 1802 he issued the first number of the Edinburgh Review , under the nominal editorship of Sydney Smith ; Lord Jeffrey, was, however, the guiding spirit of the review, having as his associates Lord Brougham , Sir Walter Scott , Henry Hallam , John Playfair and afterwards Lord Macaulay . [1]

Constable made a new departure in publishing by the generosity of his terms to authors. Writers for the Edinburgh Review were paid at an unprecedented rate, and Constable offered Scott 1000 guineas in advance for Marmion . In 1804 A. G. Hunter joined Constable as partner, bringing considerable capital into the firm, styled from that time Archibald Constable & Co. In 1805, jointly with Longman & Co. , Constable published Scott's Lay of the Last Minstrel , and in 1807 Marmion . [1]

In 1808 a split took place between Constable and Sir Walter Scott, who transferred his business to the publishing firm of John Ballantyne & Co., for which he supplied most of the capital. In 1813, however, a reconciliation took place. Ballantyne was in difficulties, and Constable again became Scott's publisher, a condition being that the firm of John Ballantyne & Co. should be wound up at an early date, though Scott retained his interest in the printing business of James Ballantyne & Co. [1]

[Archibald Constable and his Literary Correspondents, 3 vols. 1873; Lockhart's Life of Scott; Lord Cockburn's Memorials; ib. Life of Lord Jeffrey.]

In 1788 Archibald was apprenticed to Peter Hill, an Edinburgh bookseller, but in 1795 he started in business for himself as a dealer in rare books. He bought the Scots Magazine in 1801, and John Leyden , the orientalist, became its editor. In 1800 Constable began the Farmer's Magazine , and in November 1802 he issued the first number of the Edinburgh Review , under the nominal editorship of Sydney Smith ; Lord Jeffrey, was, however, the guiding spirit of the review, having as his associates Lord Brougham , Sir Walter Scott , Henry Hallam , John Playfair and afterwards Lord Macaulay . [1]

Constable made a new departure in publishing by the generosity of his terms to authors. Writers for the Edinburgh Review were paid at an unprecedented rate, and Constable offered Scott 1000 guineas in advance for Marmion . In 1804 A. G. Hunter joined Constable as partner, bringing considerable capital into the firm, styled from that time Archibald Constable & Co. In 1805, jointly with Longman & Co. , Constable published Scott's Lay of the Last Minstrel , and in 1807 Marmion . [1]

In 1808 a split took place between Constable and Sir Walter Scott, who transferred his business to the publishing firm of John Ballantyne & Co., for which he supplied most of the capital. In 1813, however, a reconciliation took place. Ballantyne was in difficulties, and Constable again became Scott's publisher, a condition being that the firm of John Ballantyne & Co. should be wound up at an early date, though Scott retained his interest in the printing business of James Ballantyne & Co. [1]


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