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Thoughts on the late negotiation at paris; the causes of its failure; the principles on which it ough - Thoughts on Late Style » Edward Said



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“Remember the solidarity shown to Palestine here and everywhere… and remember also that there is a cause to which many people have committed themselves, difficulties and terrible obstacles notwithstanding. Why? Because it is a just cause, a noble ideal, a moral quest for equality and human rights.”

The accepted notion is that age confers a spirit of reconciliation and serenity on late works, often expressed in terms of a miraculous transfiguration of reality. In late plays such as The Tempest or The Winter’s Tale, Shakespeare returns to the forms of romance and parable; similarly, in Sophocles’ Oedipus at Colonus the aged hero is portrayed as having finally attained a remarkable holiness and sense of resolution. Or there is the well-known case of Verdi, who in his last years produced Otello and Falstaff, works that exude a renewed, almost youthful creativity and power.

So convincing as cultural symbol to Adorno was the figure of the ageing, deaf and isolated composer that it turns up in Thomas Mann’s Doctor Faustus – Adorno gave Mann a great deal of help with the novel – in the form of a lecture on Beethoven’s final period given by Adrian Leverkühn’s composition teacher, Wendell Kretschmar:

Please choose whether or not you want other users to be able to see on your profile that this library is a favorite of yours.

Please choose whether or not you want other users to be able to see on your profile that this library is a favorite of yours.

Please choose whether or not you want other users to be able to see on your profile that this library is a favorite of yours.

Please choose whether or not you want other users to be able to see on your profile that this library is a favorite of yours.

“Remember the solidarity shown to Palestine here and everywhere… and remember also that there is a cause to which many people have committed themselves, difficulties and terrible obstacles notwithstanding. Why? Because it is a just cause, a noble ideal, a moral quest for equality and human rights.”

The accepted notion is that age confers a spirit of reconciliation and serenity on late works, often expressed in terms of a miraculous transfiguration of reality. In late plays such as The Tempest or The Winter’s Tale, Shakespeare returns to the forms of romance and parable; similarly, in Sophocles’ Oedipus at Colonus the aged hero is portrayed as having finally attained a remarkable holiness and sense of resolution. Or there is the well-known case of Verdi, who in his last years produced Otello and Falstaff, works that exude a renewed, almost youthful creativity and power.

So convincing as cultural symbol to Adorno was the figure of the ageing, deaf and isolated composer that it turns up in Thomas Mann’s Doctor Faustus – Adorno gave Mann a great deal of help with the novel – in the form of a lecture on Beethoven’s final period given by Adrian Leverkühn’s composition teacher, Wendell Kretschmar:

First, this decision proves decisively that no nominees to the Supreme Court should survive the confirmation process without voicing definitive and honest answers to their positions on significant constitutional questions. Carhart lifts the gossamer cloak of inviolability judicial nominees and their political parties have used to prevent opponents from divining a nominee's position on tough issues. Most recently, nominees have bobbed, weaved, dodged, and danced around their positions on Roe v. Wade, the decision which legalized abortion on a national scale in the early 1970s.

Chief Justice John G. Roberts, in his Senate confirmation hearings, would say little more than that he would uphold the Constitution (whatever that means) and that the Supreme Court was no place for ideologues. Yet on each decision that has come before the court in his brief tenure, he has sided squarely against the right to privacy and for the invasion of religious morality into the legal system.

Justice Samuel Alito was only slightly more forthcoming during his confirmation hearings on what has become his stalwartly antiabortion stand:

I wanted to jot down some of our thoughts on Adobe’s Flash products so that customers and critics may better understand why we do not allow Flash on iPhones, iPods and iPads. Adobe has characterized our decision as being primarily business driven – they say we want to protect our App Store – but in reality it is based on technology issues. Adobe claims that we are a closed system, and that Flash is open, but in fact the opposite is true. Let me explain.

Adobe’s Flash products are 100% proprietary. They are only available from Adobe, and Adobe has sole authority as to their future enhancement, pricing, etc. While Adobe’s Flash products are widely available, this does not mean they are open, since they are controlled entirely by Adobe and available only from Adobe. By almost any definition, Flash is a closed system.

Apple even creates open standards for the web. For example, Apple began with a small open source project and created WebKit, a complete open-source HTML5 rendering engine that is the heart of the Safari web browser used in all our products. WebKit has been widely adopted. Google uses it for Android’s browser, Palm uses it, Nokia uses it, and RIM (Blackberry) has announced they will use it too. Almost every smartphone web browser other than Microsoft’s uses WebKit. By making its WebKit technology open, Apple has set the standard for mobile web browsers.

David Letterman recently sat down with his old friend Norm Macdonald to shoot the breeze and discuss the current state of the late-night game.

In a rare public interview, the retired host of “The Late Show” appeared on the third-season premiere of Macdonald’s video podcast “Norm Macdonald Live,” where the pair chatted about life, comedy, and late-night talk shows.

Macdonald brought up the current abundance of late night hosts, asking Letterman whether he thinks these shows are all following the same template. “At one point, there was two shows: The 11:30 p.m. show and the 12:30 a.m. show, Johnny Carson and David Letterman,” the “Saturday Night Live” alum said. “Now, there are one-hundred Johnny Carsons and no David Letterman. I mean, there are one-hundred 11:30 p.m. shows. The shows are indistinct.”

Please choose whether or not you want other users to be able to see on your profile that this library is a favorite of yours.

Please choose whether or not you want other users to be able to see on your profile that this library is a favorite of yours.

Please choose whether or not you want other users to be able to see on your profile that this library is a favorite of yours.

“Remember the solidarity shown to Palestine here and everywhere… and remember also that there is a cause to which many people have committed themselves, difficulties and terrible obstacles notwithstanding. Why? Because it is a just cause, a noble ideal, a moral quest for equality and human rights.”

The accepted notion is that age confers a spirit of reconciliation and serenity on late works, often expressed in terms of a miraculous transfiguration of reality. In late plays such as The Tempest or The Winter’s Tale, Shakespeare returns to the forms of romance and parable; similarly, in Sophocles’ Oedipus at Colonus the aged hero is portrayed as having finally attained a remarkable holiness and sense of resolution. Or there is the well-known case of Verdi, who in his last years produced Otello and Falstaff, works that exude a renewed, almost youthful creativity and power.

So convincing as cultural symbol to Adorno was the figure of the ageing, deaf and isolated composer that it turns up in Thomas Mann’s Doctor Faustus – Adorno gave Mann a great deal of help with the novel – in the form of a lecture on Beethoven’s final period given by Adrian Leverkühn’s composition teacher, Wendell Kretschmar:

First, this decision proves decisively that no nominees to the Supreme Court should survive the confirmation process without voicing definitive and honest answers to their positions on significant constitutional questions. Carhart lifts the gossamer cloak of inviolability judicial nominees and their political parties have used to prevent opponents from divining a nominee's position on tough issues. Most recently, nominees have bobbed, weaved, dodged, and danced around their positions on Roe v. Wade, the decision which legalized abortion on a national scale in the early 1970s.

Chief Justice John G. Roberts, in his Senate confirmation hearings, would say little more than that he would uphold the Constitution (whatever that means) and that the Supreme Court was no place for ideologues. Yet on each decision that has come before the court in his brief tenure, he has sided squarely against the right to privacy and for the invasion of religious morality into the legal system.

Justice Samuel Alito was only slightly more forthcoming during his confirmation hearings on what has become his stalwartly antiabortion stand:

I wanted to jot down some of our thoughts on Adobe’s Flash products so that customers and critics may better understand why we do not allow Flash on iPhones, iPods and iPads. Adobe has characterized our decision as being primarily business driven – they say we want to protect our App Store – but in reality it is based on technology issues. Adobe claims that we are a closed system, and that Flash is open, but in fact the opposite is true. Let me explain.

Adobe’s Flash products are 100% proprietary. They are only available from Adobe, and Adobe has sole authority as to their future enhancement, pricing, etc. While Adobe’s Flash products are widely available, this does not mean they are open, since they are controlled entirely by Adobe and available only from Adobe. By almost any definition, Flash is a closed system.

Apple even creates open standards for the web. For example, Apple began with a small open source project and created WebKit, a complete open-source HTML5 rendering engine that is the heart of the Safari web browser used in all our products. WebKit has been widely adopted. Google uses it for Android’s browser, Palm uses it, Nokia uses it, and RIM (Blackberry) has announced they will use it too. Almost every smartphone web browser other than Microsoft’s uses WebKit. By making its WebKit technology open, Apple has set the standard for mobile web browsers.

Please choose whether or not you want other users to be able to see on your profile that this library is a favorite of yours.

Please choose whether or not you want other users to be able to see on your profile that this library is a favorite of yours.

“Remember the solidarity shown to Palestine here and everywhere… and remember also that there is a cause to which many people have committed themselves, difficulties and terrible obstacles notwithstanding. Why? Because it is a just cause, a noble ideal, a moral quest for equality and human rights.”

The accepted notion is that age confers a spirit of reconciliation and serenity on late works, often expressed in terms of a miraculous transfiguration of reality. In late plays such as The Tempest or The Winter’s Tale, Shakespeare returns to the forms of romance and parable; similarly, in Sophocles’ Oedipus at Colonus the aged hero is portrayed as having finally attained a remarkable holiness and sense of resolution. Or there is the well-known case of Verdi, who in his last years produced Otello and Falstaff, works that exude a renewed, almost youthful creativity and power.

So convincing as cultural symbol to Adorno was the figure of the ageing, deaf and isolated composer that it turns up in Thomas Mann’s Doctor Faustus – Adorno gave Mann a great deal of help with the novel – in the form of a lecture on Beethoven’s final period given by Adrian Leverkühn’s composition teacher, Wendell Kretschmar:

First, this decision proves decisively that no nominees to the Supreme Court should survive the confirmation process without voicing definitive and honest answers to their positions on significant constitutional questions. Carhart lifts the gossamer cloak of inviolability judicial nominees and their political parties have used to prevent opponents from divining a nominee's position on tough issues. Most recently, nominees have bobbed, weaved, dodged, and danced around their positions on Roe v. Wade, the decision which legalized abortion on a national scale in the early 1970s.

Chief Justice John G. Roberts, in his Senate confirmation hearings, would say little more than that he would uphold the Constitution (whatever that means) and that the Supreme Court was no place for ideologues. Yet on each decision that has come before the court in his brief tenure, he has sided squarely against the right to privacy and for the invasion of religious morality into the legal system.

Justice Samuel Alito was only slightly more forthcoming during his confirmation hearings on what has become his stalwartly antiabortion stand:


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