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Polar day - What Is Midnight Sun or Polar Day? - Time and Date



The midnight sun is a natural phenomenon that occurs in the summer months in places north of the Arctic Circle or south of the Antarctic Circle , when the sun remains visible at the local midnight.

Around the summer solstice (approximately 21 June in the Northern Hemisphere and 22 December in the Southern Hemisphere ), the sun is visible for the full 24 hours, given fair weather. The number of days per year with potential midnight sun increases the closer towards either pole one goes. Although approximately defined by the polar circles , in practice the midnight sun can be seen as much as 55 miles (90 km) outside the polar circle, as described below, and the exact latitudes of the farthest reaches of midnight sun depend on topography and vary slightly year-to-year.

Since the axial tilt of the Earth is considerable (approximately 23 degrees 27 minutes), the sun does not set at high latitudes in local summer. [1] The sun remains continuously visible for one day during the summer solstice at the polar circle, for several weeks only 100 km (62 mi) closer to the pole, and for six months at the pole. At extreme latitudes, the midnight sun is usually referred to as polar day.

The midnight sun is a natural phenomenon that occurs in the summer months in places north of the Arctic Circle or south of the Antarctic Circle , when the sun remains visible at the local midnight.

Around the summer solstice (approximately 21 June in the Northern Hemisphere and 22 December in the Southern Hemisphere ), the sun is visible for the full 24 hours, given fair weather. The number of days per year with potential midnight sun increases the closer towards either pole one goes. Although approximately defined by the polar circles , in practice the midnight sun can be seen as much as 55 miles (90 km) outside the polar circle, as described below, and the exact latitudes of the farthest reaches of midnight sun depend on topography and vary slightly year-to-year.

Since the axial tilt of the Earth is considerable (approximately 23 degrees 27 minutes), the sun does not set at high latitudes in local summer. [1] The sun remains continuously visible for one day during the summer solstice at the polar circle, for several weeks only 100 km (62 mi) closer to the pole, and for six months at the pole. At extreme latitudes, the midnight sun is usually referred to as polar day.

On Monday 29th February, Year 4 were treated to an ice cold Arctic Polar Day! Alba, a scientist who has visited the Arctic, shared her experiences with the children. We learnt about dehydrated food, flare guns, Inuits, husky dogs and the different layers of clothing that have to be worn when you visit a polar region.

As well as hearing about Alba’s first hand experiences of the Arctic, we also enjoyed other activities. These included Blubber Gloves, where we dipped our hands in ice cold water protected by layered plastic bags and lard. This enabled us to better understand how a polar bear’s blubber helps to keep it warm in the Arctic. During our Gloopy Glacier activity, we used cornflour and water to help us see how a glacier moves slowly down a mountain. It was messy fun!

Did you know there are about 4 million Inuits living in the Arctic? They have to survive the harsh conditions of this polar region and during the long, dark winter months, they spend time painting. Their artwork reflects their lifestyle. We experimented with our own drawings of animals, igloos and Inuit equipment and we then used special paint to print our picture onto paper using polystyrene and a roller.

The midnight sun is a natural phenomenon that occurs in the summer months in places north of the Arctic Circle or south of the Antarctic Circle , when the sun remains visible at the local midnight.

Around the summer solstice (approximately 21 June in the Northern Hemisphere and 22 December in the Southern Hemisphere ), the sun is visible for the full 24 hours, given fair weather. The number of days per year with potential midnight sun increases the closer towards either pole one goes. Although approximately defined by the polar circles , in practice the midnight sun can be seen as much as 55 miles (90 km) outside the polar circle, as described below, and the exact latitudes of the farthest reaches of midnight sun depend on topography and vary slightly year-to-year.

Since the axial tilt of the Earth is considerable (approximately 23 degrees 27 minutes), the sun does not set at high latitudes in local summer. [1] The sun remains continuously visible for one day during the summer solstice at the polar circle, for several weeks only 100 km (62 mi) closer to the pole, and for six months at the pole. At extreme latitudes, the midnight sun is usually referred to as polar day.

On Monday 29th February, Year 4 were treated to an ice cold Arctic Polar Day! Alba, a scientist who has visited the Arctic, shared her experiences with the children. We learnt about dehydrated food, flare guns, Inuits, husky dogs and the different layers of clothing that have to be worn when you visit a polar region.

As well as hearing about Alba’s first hand experiences of the Arctic, we also enjoyed other activities. These included Blubber Gloves, where we dipped our hands in ice cold water protected by layered plastic bags and lard. This enabled us to better understand how a polar bear’s blubber helps to keep it warm in the Arctic. During our Gloopy Glacier activity, we used cornflour and water to help us see how a glacier moves slowly down a mountain. It was messy fun!

Did you know there are about 4 million Inuits living in the Arctic? They have to survive the harsh conditions of this polar region and during the long, dark winter months, they spend time painting. Their artwork reflects their lifestyle. We experimented with our own drawings of animals, igloos and Inuit equipment and we then used special paint to print our picture onto paper using polystyrene and a roller.

Despite the recent closure of the rail line, there are still several ways that visitors can travel to Churchill.  
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Come join us for your ultimate polar bear viewing experience. Travel with our guides in the most luxurious custom built Polar Rovers, where you will see arctic wildlife including arctic fox, caribou, snowy owls and of course the magnificent polar bear...all in their natural environment. Stay at our custom built Tundra Lodge, sleeping with polar bears under the awe inspiring northern lights.

Learn more about our company, our polar rovers and tundra lodge, and meet the staff that will take you on your Great White Bear Tour!


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