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Our idolatry: in simple rhyme (classic reprint) - Idolatry - Wikipedia



The opposition to the use of any icon or image to represent ideas of reverence or worship is called aniconism . [9] The destruction of idols and images as icons of veneration is called iconoclasm , [10] and this has long been accompanied with violence between religious groups that forbid idol worship and those who have accepted icons, images and idols for worship. [11] [12] The definition of idolatry has been a contested topic within Abrahamic religions, with some Muslims considering the Christian use of the cross as a symbol of Christ, and of Madonna (Mary) in some churches, as a form of idolatry. [13] [14]

The history of religions has been marked with accusations and denials of idolatry. These accusations have considered statues and images to be devoid of symbolism. Alternatively, the topic of idolatry has been a source of disagreements between many religions, or within denominations of various religions, with the presumption that icons of one's own religious practices have meaningful symbolism, while another person's different religious practices do not. [15] [16]

The word idolatry comes from the Greek word eidololatria ( εἰδωλολατρία ) which itself is a compound of two words: eidolon ( εἴδωλον "image") and latreia (λατρεία "worship", related to λάτρις ). [17] The word eidololatria thus means "worship of idols", which in Latin appears first as idololatria , then in Vulgar Latin as idolatria , therefrom it appears in 12th century Old French as idolatrie , which for the first time in mid 13th century English appears as "idolatry". [18] [19]

The opposition to the use of any icon or image to represent ideas of reverence or worship is called aniconism . [9] The destruction of idols and images as icons of veneration is called iconoclasm , [10] and this has long been accompanied with violence between religious groups that forbid idol worship and those who have accepted icons, images and idols for worship. [11] [12] The definition of idolatry has been a contested topic within Abrahamic religions, with some Muslims considering the Christian use of the cross as a symbol of Christ, and of Madonna (Mary) in some churches, as a form of idolatry. [13] [14]

The history of religions has been marked with accusations and denials of idolatry. These accusations have considered statues and images to be devoid of symbolism. Alternatively, the topic of idolatry has been a source of disagreements between many religions, or within denominations of various religions, with the presumption that icons of one's own religious practices have meaningful symbolism, while another person's different religious practices do not. [15] [16]

The word idolatry comes from the Greek word eidololatria ( εἰδωλολατρία ) which itself is a compound of two words: eidolon ( εἴδωλον "image") and latreia (λατρεία "worship", related to λάτρις ). [17] The word eidololatria thus means "worship of idols", which in Latin appears first as idololatria , then in Vulgar Latin as idolatria , therefrom it appears in 12th century Old French as idolatrie , which for the first time in mid 13th century English appears as "idolatry". [18] [19]

Heresy ( / ˈ h ɛr ə s i / ) is any belief or theory that is strongly at variance with established beliefs or customs, in particular the accepted beliefs of a church or religious organization. A heretic is a proponent of such claims or beliefs. [1] Heresy is distinct from both apostasy , which is the explicit renunciation of one's religion, principles or cause, [2] and blasphemy , which is an impious utterance or action concerning God or sacred things. [3]

The term is usually used to refer to violations of important religious teachings, but is used also of views strongly opposed to any generally accepted ideas. [4] It is used in particular in reference to Christianity , Judaism , and Islam . [5]

In certain historical Christian, Islamic and Jewish cultures, among others, espousing ideas deemed heretical has been and in some cases still is subjected not merely to punishments such as excommunication , but even the death penalty.

In a loving and pastoral way, John encouraged us not to ruin ourselves by replacing God on the thrones of our lives with something else, something less. In our sinfulness, we are prone to wander, prone to leave the God we love, prone to idols.

God, in His great love, is jealous for our affection and attention. And it is good for us that He is jealous because only He can quench our souls. If He didn’t discipline us, didn’t pull us back to Himself, didn’t grab our attention, He would be allowing us to wallow in something less glorious, something less satisfying.

Even believers may be reproved on this subject. God is very jealous of his deity in the hearts of his own people.

I still remember the words of a successful agent at a writer’s conference. He said, “Money changes people. I’ve only met a couple of Christian writers who haven’t been negatively affected by success.”

I’ve only been blogging for a little over a year this time around, but it didn’t take long to see how easy it would be to make writing an idol.

If you’re pursuing a goal, you know what I mean. It’s easy to become consumed by it. And while the goal itself might be wonderful–a way to love God and others–it still has the potential to mess us up. If we’re not careful, it will lead us away from God.

The opposition to the use of any icon or image to represent ideas of reverence or worship is called aniconism . [9] The destruction of idols and images as icons of veneration is called iconoclasm , [10] and this has long been accompanied with violence between religious groups that forbid idol worship and those who have accepted icons, images and idols for worship. [11] [12] The definition of idolatry has been a contested topic within Abrahamic religions, with some Muslims considering the Christian use of the cross as a symbol of Christ, and of Madonna (Mary) in some churches, as a form of idolatry. [13] [14]

The history of religions has been marked with accusations and denials of idolatry. These accusations have considered statues and images to be devoid of symbolism. Alternatively, the topic of idolatry has been a source of disagreements between many religions, or within denominations of various religions, with the presumption that icons of one's own religious practices have meaningful symbolism, while another person's different religious practices do not. [15] [16]

The word idolatry comes from the Greek word eidololatria ( εἰδωλολατρία ) which itself is a compound of two words: eidolon ( εἴδωλον "image") and latreia (λατρεία "worship", related to λάτρις ). [17] The word eidololatria thus means "worship of idols", which in Latin appears first as idololatria , then in Vulgar Latin as idolatria , therefrom it appears in 12th century Old French as idolatrie , which for the first time in mid 13th century English appears as "idolatry". [18] [19]

Heresy ( / ˈ h ɛr ə s i / ) is any belief or theory that is strongly at variance with established beliefs or customs, in particular the accepted beliefs of a church or religious organization. A heretic is a proponent of such claims or beliefs. [1] Heresy is distinct from both apostasy , which is the explicit renunciation of one's religion, principles or cause, [2] and blasphemy , which is an impious utterance or action concerning God or sacred things. [3]

The term is usually used to refer to violations of important religious teachings, but is used also of views strongly opposed to any generally accepted ideas. [4] It is used in particular in reference to Christianity , Judaism , and Islam . [5]

In certain historical Christian, Islamic and Jewish cultures, among others, espousing ideas deemed heretical has been and in some cases still is subjected not merely to punishments such as excommunication , but even the death penalty.

In a loving and pastoral way, John encouraged us not to ruin ourselves by replacing God on the thrones of our lives with something else, something less. In our sinfulness, we are prone to wander, prone to leave the God we love, prone to idols.

God, in His great love, is jealous for our affection and attention. And it is good for us that He is jealous because only He can quench our souls. If He didn’t discipline us, didn’t pull us back to Himself, didn’t grab our attention, He would be allowing us to wallow in something less glorious, something less satisfying.

Even believers may be reproved on this subject. God is very jealous of his deity in the hearts of his own people.

I still remember the words of a successful agent at a writer’s conference. He said, “Money changes people. I’ve only met a couple of Christian writers who haven’t been negatively affected by success.”

I’ve only been blogging for a little over a year this time around, but it didn’t take long to see how easy it would be to make writing an idol.

If you’re pursuing a goal, you know what I mean. It’s easy to become consumed by it. And while the goal itself might be wonderful–a way to love God and others–it still has the potential to mess us up. If we’re not careful, it will lead us away from God.

Have you thought much about the biblical sin of idolatry lately? Most people don’t think much about it because, after all, it’s not something that we deal with too much in the 21st century West. We don’t see many people bowing down and worshiping statues and shrines today, do we? But is that all idolatry entails? Is bowing down to an Asherah pole the full idea behind the biblical prohibition against idolatry?

I don’t think so. In fact, I think idolatry is the most pervasive of all sins. To be more precise, I am now convinced that all sin is a form of idolatry.

My friend and I are going through the book of First Corinthians in our Bible study right now and we just finished up the section in 10:14-22 . This is part of a major section of this letter from Paul to the church in Corinth; it starts in 8:1 and goes to 11:1. In this section Paul is addressing a concern that was brought up in a letter that Paul received from the Corinthian church, that of whether or not it’s OK to eat meat sacrificed to idols. In this section he’s more specifically addressing the issue of Christian freedom as it pertains to eating meat sacrificed to idols in the temple dedicated to that idol.

The opposition to the use of any icon or image to represent ideas of reverence or worship is called aniconism . [9] The destruction of idols and images as icons of veneration is called iconoclasm , [10] and this has long been accompanied with violence between religious groups that forbid idol worship and those who have accepted icons, images and idols for worship. [11] [12] The definition of idolatry has been a contested topic within Abrahamic religions, with some Muslims considering the Christian use of the cross as a symbol of Christ, and of Madonna (Mary) in some churches, as a form of idolatry. [13] [14]

The history of religions has been marked with accusations and denials of idolatry. These accusations have considered statues and images to be devoid of symbolism. Alternatively, the topic of idolatry has been a source of disagreements between many religions, or within denominations of various religions, with the presumption that icons of one's own religious practices have meaningful symbolism, while another person's different religious practices do not. [15] [16]

The word idolatry comes from the Greek word eidololatria ( εἰδωλολατρία ) which itself is a compound of two words: eidolon ( εἴδωλον "image") and latreia (λατρεία "worship", related to λάτρις ). [17] The word eidololatria thus means "worship of idols", which in Latin appears first as idololatria , then in Vulgar Latin as idolatria , therefrom it appears in 12th century Old French as idolatrie , which for the first time in mid 13th century English appears as "idolatry". [18] [19]

Heresy ( / ˈ h ɛr ə s i / ) is any belief or theory that is strongly at variance with established beliefs or customs, in particular the accepted beliefs of a church or religious organization. A heretic is a proponent of such claims or beliefs. [1] Heresy is distinct from both apostasy , which is the explicit renunciation of one's religion, principles or cause, [2] and blasphemy , which is an impious utterance or action concerning God or sacred things. [3]

The term is usually used to refer to violations of important religious teachings, but is used also of views strongly opposed to any generally accepted ideas. [4] It is used in particular in reference to Christianity , Judaism , and Islam . [5]

In certain historical Christian, Islamic and Jewish cultures, among others, espousing ideas deemed heretical has been and in some cases still is subjected not merely to punishments such as excommunication , but even the death penalty.

The opposition to the use of any icon or image to represent ideas of reverence or worship is called aniconism . [9] The destruction of idols and images as icons of veneration is called iconoclasm , [10] and this has long been accompanied with violence between religious groups that forbid idol worship and those who have accepted icons, images and idols for worship. [11] [12] The definition of idolatry has been a contested topic within Abrahamic religions, with some Muslims considering the Christian use of the cross as a symbol of Christ, and of Madonna (Mary) in some churches, as a form of idolatry. [13] [14]

The history of religions has been marked with accusations and denials of idolatry. These accusations have considered statues and images to be devoid of symbolism. Alternatively, the topic of idolatry has been a source of disagreements between many religions, or within denominations of various religions, with the presumption that icons of one's own religious practices have meaningful symbolism, while another person's different religious practices do not. [15] [16]

The word idolatry comes from the Greek word eidololatria ( εἰδωλολατρία ) which itself is a compound of two words: eidolon ( εἴδωλον "image") and latreia (λατρεία "worship", related to λάτρις ). [17] The word eidololatria thus means "worship of idols", which in Latin appears first as idololatria , then in Vulgar Latin as idolatria , therefrom it appears in 12th century Old French as idolatrie , which for the first time in mid 13th century English appears as "idolatry". [18] [19]

Heresy ( / ˈ h ɛr ə s i / ) is any belief or theory that is strongly at variance with established beliefs or customs, in particular the accepted beliefs of a church or religious organization. A heretic is a proponent of such claims or beliefs. [1] Heresy is distinct from both apostasy , which is the explicit renunciation of one's religion, principles or cause, [2] and blasphemy , which is an impious utterance or action concerning God or sacred things. [3]

The term is usually used to refer to violations of important religious teachings, but is used also of views strongly opposed to any generally accepted ideas. [4] It is used in particular in reference to Christianity , Judaism , and Islam . [5]

In certain historical Christian, Islamic and Jewish cultures, among others, espousing ideas deemed heretical has been and in some cases still is subjected not merely to punishments such as excommunication , but even the death penalty.

In a loving and pastoral way, John encouraged us not to ruin ourselves by replacing God on the thrones of our lives with something else, something less. In our sinfulness, we are prone to wander, prone to leave the God we love, prone to idols.

God, in His great love, is jealous for our affection and attention. And it is good for us that He is jealous because only He can quench our souls. If He didn’t discipline us, didn’t pull us back to Himself, didn’t grab our attention, He would be allowing us to wallow in something less glorious, something less satisfying.

Even believers may be reproved on this subject. God is very jealous of his deity in the hearts of his own people.


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