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Suzuki tl1000s, tl1000r and dl1000 v-strom '97 to '04 (haynes service and repair manual) - Suzuki TL1000S - Wikipedia



The TL1000R was Suzuki’s homologation answer to the dominance of the Ducati 916 in WSB, but like an overweight Joe Bugner wobbling into the ring to get a thorough pasting by Frank Bruno the TL was never up to the job. Everything about the TL1000R was poorly timed. It appeared at the height of its TL-S brother’s handling uproar and was never the Ducati-whooping WSB bike that pre-launch hype hinted at. Sales ere poor, the racing never happened, and six years later R was dropped from Suzuki’s range. All of which culminated in the R becoming a black sheep in the two-wheeled flock.

Which is why, having never ridden one, I tended to snigger at TL1000R owners. Let’s be truthful here, it isn’t really a looker. The gigantic arse end is ridiculous and the front bulbous and ungainly. But, as I now have found out, it was the TL owners who had the last laugh. Because the R is a lovely bike.

Sitting on it the first thing you notice is the enormous and generously padded seat. It’s fantastically comfortable, as is the riding position and all encompassing fairing. The TL feels like a big bike, and sort of absorbs you into its folds, when you sit on it. It’s nothing like the sportsbikes of its day and feels more like a sports tourer. Which probably played a large part in its lack of success, but is this necessarily a bad thing?

The TL1000R was Suzuki’s homologation answer to the dominance of the Ducati 916 in WSB, but like an overweight Joe Bugner wobbling into the ring to get a thorough pasting by Frank Bruno the TL was never up to the job. Everything about the TL1000R was poorly timed. It appeared at the height of its TL-S brother’s handling uproar and was never the Ducati-whooping WSB bike that pre-launch hype hinted at. Sales ere poor, the racing never happened, and six years later R was dropped from Suzuki’s range. All of which culminated in the R becoming a black sheep in the two-wheeled flock.

Which is why, having never ridden one, I tended to snigger at TL1000R owners. Let’s be truthful here, it isn’t really a looker. The gigantic arse end is ridiculous and the front bulbous and ungainly. But, as I now have found out, it was the TL owners who had the last laugh. Because the R is a lovely bike.

Sitting on it the first thing you notice is the enormous and generously padded seat. It’s fantastically comfortable, as is the riding position and all encompassing fairing. The TL feels like a big bike, and sort of absorbs you into its folds, when you sit on it. It’s nothing like the sportsbikes of its day and feels more like a sports tourer. Which probably played a large part in its lack of success, but is this necessarily a bad thing?

TL 1000 S 1997
Overall Length: 2 065 mm (81.3 in)
Overall Width: 715 mm (28.1 in)
Overall Height: 1 175 mm (46.3 in)
Seat Height: 835 mm (32.9 in)
Wheelbase: 1 415 mm (55.7 in)
Ground Clearance: 140 mm (5.5 in)
Dry Weight: 187 kg (411 lbs)
Engine type: Water-cooled 996 cc 4-stroke 90° V-twin, DOHC, TSCC, 8 valves. 125 hp (92 kW)/ 8.500 rpm, 107,4 Nm/ 7.100 rpm.

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TL 1000 S 1997
Overall Length: 2 065 mm (81.3 in)
Overall Width: 715 mm (28.1 in)
Overall Height: 1 175 mm (46.3 in)
Seat Height: 835 mm (32.9 in)
Wheelbase: 1 415 mm (55.7 in)
Ground Clearance: 140 mm (5.5 in)
Dry Weight: 187 kg (411 lbs)
Engine type: Water-cooled 996 cc 4-stroke 90° V-twin, DOHC, TSCC, 8 valves. 125 hp (92 kW)/ 8.500 rpm, 107,4 NM/ 7.100 rpm.

Click on the image for larger format.

TL 1000 S 1998
Overall Length: 2 065 mm (81.3 in)
Overall Width: 715 mm (28.1 in)
Overall Height: 1 175 mm (46.3 in)
Seat Height: 835 mm (32.9 in)
Wheelbase: 1 415 mm (55.7 in)
Ground Clearance: 140 mm (5.5 in)
Dry Weight: 187 kg (411 lbs)
Engine type: Water-cooled 996 cc 4-stroke 90° V-twin, DOHC, TSCC, 8 valves. 125 hp (92 kW)/ 8.500 rpm, 107,4 NM/ 7.100 rpm.

Click on the image for larger format.


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