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The strictest school in the world being the tale of a clever girl, a rubber boy and a collection of f - The Strictest Schools For Kids - YouTube



I had read a glowing review of The Strictest School in the World at Big A little a last month, so I was quite pleased when a review copy showed up in my mailbox (sent by that reliable provider of excellent books, Raab Associates ). The Strictest School in the World lived up to my expectations. It's so much fun! It's a book aimed squarely at the 9-12 set, featuring lovably eccentric characters, larger-than-life bad guys, two independent-minded protagonists, and madcap adventures.

The story is set in Yorkshire, England in 1894 (the late Victorian Era). The two protagonists are fourteen-year-old Emmaline Cayley and twelve-year-old Robert Burns (also called Rab). Emmaline is sent from India, where she has grown up, to live with her Aunt Lucy in England, prior to attending boarding school. (There are definite echoes here of Frances Hodgson Burnett's The Secret Garden and The Little Princess , though Emmaline is a more independent thinker than either Sara Crewe or Mary Lennox.)

Emmaline is obsessed with creating a flying machine, even though she herself is afraid of flying. Imagine her delight when she meets the intrepid Rab, called Rubberbones because of his rubber-like ability to survive falls with nary a scratch. Rubberbones, who has dropped out of school to earn money for his family, is more than happy to be paid by Aunt Lucy to support Emmaline in her flying machine projects. And Rubberbones turns out to have an instinctive knack for aviation. Together, with the support of Aunt Lucy and her unconventional butler Lal Singh, the two spend the summer constructing flying machines. They have varying degrees of success.

A school in Bristol has been called the strictest in the country after making pupils wear signs around their necks if they break the rules.

If children at Merchants Academy, in Withywood, don’t turn up in the correct uniform they are forced to wear lanyards that say ‘I have 24 hours to sort out my uniform’.

Pupils have reportedly been pulled up for wearing shoes that are too shiny, donning wrong colour hairbands and removing blazers on hot days.

Cicero said ‘a mind without instruction can no more bear fruit than a field, however fertile, without cultivation’. So it is perhaps fitting that his head is on pupils’ blazer badges at one of London’s newest and most audacious schools.

The immaculate uniform is just one thing the West London Free School has in common with other, better-known seats of learning. There is the rigorous discipline, too, as well as a focus on competitive sport, musical excellence, a house system and mandatory Latin.

But what’s truly surprising is that this isn’t a private, fee-paying school, or even one of the country’s surviving grammars, but funded by the taxpayer – and is non-selective. Here is a working example of Michael Gove’s vision of how a state school might be freed from central or local authority control.

I had read a glowing review of The Strictest School in the World at Big A little a last month, so I was quite pleased when a review copy showed up in my mailbox (sent by that reliable provider of excellent books, Raab Associates ). The Strictest School in the World lived up to my expectations. It's so much fun! It's a book aimed squarely at the 9-12 set, featuring lovably eccentric characters, larger-than-life bad guys, two independent-minded protagonists, and madcap adventures.

The story is set in Yorkshire, England in 1894 (the late Victorian Era). The two protagonists are fourteen-year-old Emmaline Cayley and twelve-year-old Robert Burns (also called Rab). Emmaline is sent from India, where she has grown up, to live with her Aunt Lucy in England, prior to attending boarding school. (There are definite echoes here of Frances Hodgson Burnett's The Secret Garden and The Little Princess , though Emmaline is a more independent thinker than either Sara Crewe or Mary Lennox.)

Emmaline is obsessed with creating a flying machine, even though she herself is afraid of flying. Imagine her delight when she meets the intrepid Rab, called Rubberbones because of his rubber-like ability to survive falls with nary a scratch. Rubberbones, who has dropped out of school to earn money for his family, is more than happy to be paid by Aunt Lucy to support Emmaline in her flying machine projects. And Rubberbones turns out to have an instinctive knack for aviation. Together, with the support of Aunt Lucy and her unconventional butler Lal Singh, the two spend the summer constructing flying machines. They have varying degrees of success.

A school in Bristol has been called the strictest in the country after making pupils wear signs around their necks if they break the rules.

If children at Merchants Academy, in Withywood, don’t turn up in the correct uniform they are forced to wear lanyards that say ‘I have 24 hours to sort out my uniform’.

Pupils have reportedly been pulled up for wearing shoes that are too shiny, donning wrong colour hairbands and removing blazers on hot days.

Cicero said ‘a mind without instruction can no more bear fruit than a field, however fertile, without cultivation’. So it is perhaps fitting that his head is on pupils’ blazer badges at one of London’s newest and most audacious schools.

The immaculate uniform is just one thing the West London Free School has in common with other, better-known seats of learning. There is the rigorous discipline, too, as well as a focus on competitive sport, musical excellence, a house system and mandatory Latin.

But what’s truly surprising is that this isn’t a private, fee-paying school, or even one of the country’s surviving grammars, but funded by the taxpayer – and is non-selective. Here is a working example of Michael Gove’s vision of how a state school might be freed from central or local authority control.

‘Britain’s toughest teacher’ Katharine Birbalsingh at the Michaela Community School in north-west London during a visit by former London mayor Boris Johnson. The school has been dubbed ’the strictest school in Britain’.

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British parents are among the strictest in Europe with even the Germans more lenient than UK mothers and fathers after a study has revealed they are more reluctant to let their children play and travel unsupervised.

Worried parents in England restrict their child’s ability to play and travel without adult supervision more than their European counterparts, the research found.

The study revealed parents are mainly worried about the potential danger from road traffic and going out in the dark and it followed calls from leading teachers to expose children to more genuine risk.

I had read a glowing review of The Strictest School in the World at Big A little a last month, so I was quite pleased when a review copy showed up in my mailbox (sent by that reliable provider of excellent books, Raab Associates ). The Strictest School in the World lived up to my expectations. It's so much fun! It's a book aimed squarely at the 9-12 set, featuring lovably eccentric characters, larger-than-life bad guys, two independent-minded protagonists, and madcap adventures.

The story is set in Yorkshire, England in 1894 (the late Victorian Era). The two protagonists are fourteen-year-old Emmaline Cayley and twelve-year-old Robert Burns (also called Rab). Emmaline is sent from India, where she has grown up, to live with her Aunt Lucy in England, prior to attending boarding school. (There are definite echoes here of Frances Hodgson Burnett's The Secret Garden and The Little Princess , though Emmaline is a more independent thinker than either Sara Crewe or Mary Lennox.)

Emmaline is obsessed with creating a flying machine, even though she herself is afraid of flying. Imagine her delight when she meets the intrepid Rab, called Rubberbones because of his rubber-like ability to survive falls with nary a scratch. Rubberbones, who has dropped out of school to earn money for his family, is more than happy to be paid by Aunt Lucy to support Emmaline in her flying machine projects. And Rubberbones turns out to have an instinctive knack for aviation. Together, with the support of Aunt Lucy and her unconventional butler Lal Singh, the two spend the summer constructing flying machines. They have varying degrees of success.

I had read a glowing review of The Strictest School in the World at Big A little a last month, so I was quite pleased when a review copy showed up in my mailbox (sent by that reliable provider of excellent books, Raab Associates ). The Strictest School in the World lived up to my expectations. It's so much fun! It's a book aimed squarely at the 9-12 set, featuring lovably eccentric characters, larger-than-life bad guys, two independent-minded protagonists, and madcap adventures.

The story is set in Yorkshire, England in 1894 (the late Victorian Era). The two protagonists are fourteen-year-old Emmaline Cayley and twelve-year-old Robert Burns (also called Rab). Emmaline is sent from India, where she has grown up, to live with her Aunt Lucy in England, prior to attending boarding school. (There are definite echoes here of Frances Hodgson Burnett's The Secret Garden and The Little Princess , though Emmaline is a more independent thinker than either Sara Crewe or Mary Lennox.)

Emmaline is obsessed with creating a flying machine, even though she herself is afraid of flying. Imagine her delight when she meets the intrepid Rab, called Rubberbones because of his rubber-like ability to survive falls with nary a scratch. Rubberbones, who has dropped out of school to earn money for his family, is more than happy to be paid by Aunt Lucy to support Emmaline in her flying machine projects. And Rubberbones turns out to have an instinctive knack for aviation. Together, with the support of Aunt Lucy and her unconventional butler Lal Singh, the two spend the summer constructing flying machines. They have varying degrees of success.

A school in Bristol has been called the strictest in the country after making pupils wear signs around their necks if they break the rules.

If children at Merchants Academy, in Withywood, don’t turn up in the correct uniform they are forced to wear lanyards that say ‘I have 24 hours to sort out my uniform’.

Pupils have reportedly been pulled up for wearing shoes that are too shiny, donning wrong colour hairbands and removing blazers on hot days.

Cicero said ‘a mind without instruction can no more bear fruit than a field, however fertile, without cultivation’. So it is perhaps fitting that his head is on pupils’ blazer badges at one of London’s newest and most audacious schools.

The immaculate uniform is just one thing the West London Free School has in common with other, better-known seats of learning. There is the rigorous discipline, too, as well as a focus on competitive sport, musical excellence, a house system and mandatory Latin.

But what’s truly surprising is that this isn’t a private, fee-paying school, or even one of the country’s surviving grammars, but funded by the taxpayer – and is non-selective. Here is a working example of Michael Gove’s vision of how a state school might be freed from central or local authority control.

‘Britain’s toughest teacher’ Katharine Birbalsingh at the Michaela Community School in north-west London during a visit by former London mayor Boris Johnson. The school has been dubbed ’the strictest school in Britain’.

Sign up to receive our email sent every Friday featuring offers, competitions and a preview of what’s coming up in the weekend edition.

I had read a glowing review of The Strictest School in the World at Big A little a last month, so I was quite pleased when a review copy showed up in my mailbox (sent by that reliable provider of excellent books, Raab Associates ). The Strictest School in the World lived up to my expectations. It's so much fun! It's a book aimed squarely at the 9-12 set, featuring lovably eccentric characters, larger-than-life bad guys, two independent-minded protagonists, and madcap adventures.

The story is set in Yorkshire, England in 1894 (the late Victorian Era). The two protagonists are fourteen-year-old Emmaline Cayley and twelve-year-old Robert Burns (also called Rab). Emmaline is sent from India, where she has grown up, to live with her Aunt Lucy in England, prior to attending boarding school. (There are definite echoes here of Frances Hodgson Burnett's The Secret Garden and The Little Princess , though Emmaline is a more independent thinker than either Sara Crewe or Mary Lennox.)

Emmaline is obsessed with creating a flying machine, even though she herself is afraid of flying. Imagine her delight when she meets the intrepid Rab, called Rubberbones because of his rubber-like ability to survive falls with nary a scratch. Rubberbones, who has dropped out of school to earn money for his family, is more than happy to be paid by Aunt Lucy to support Emmaline in her flying machine projects. And Rubberbones turns out to have an instinctive knack for aviation. Together, with the support of Aunt Lucy and her unconventional butler Lal Singh, the two spend the summer constructing flying machines. They have varying degrees of success.

A school in Bristol has been called the strictest in the country after making pupils wear signs around their necks if they break the rules.

If children at Merchants Academy, in Withywood, don’t turn up in the correct uniform they are forced to wear lanyards that say ‘I have 24 hours to sort out my uniform’.

Pupils have reportedly been pulled up for wearing shoes that are too shiny, donning wrong colour hairbands and removing blazers on hot days.


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