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An ecclesiastical history of scotland: from the introduction of christianity to the present time, vol - An Ecclesiastical History of the English People by Bede.



Perga or Perge ( Greek : Πέργη Perge , Turkish : Perge ) was an ancient Anatolian city in modern Turkey, once the capital of Pamphylia Secunda , now in Antalya province on the southwestern Mediterranean coast of Turkey . Today, it is a large site of ancient ruins 15 kilometres (9.3 mi) east of Antalya on the coastal plain. An acropolis located there dates back to the Bronze Age . [1]

Perga was an ancient and important city of Pamphylia, between the rivers Catarrhactes and Cestrus (Turkish Aksu Çayı). [2]

A treaty between the Hittite Great King Tudhaliya IV and his vassal, the king of Tarhuntassa , defined the latter's western border at the city "Parha" and the "Kastaraya River". [3] The river is assumed to be the classical Cestrus. West of Parha were the "Lukka Lands". [4] Parha likely spoke a late Luwian dialect like Lycian and that of the neo-Hittite kingdoms.

Perga or Perge ( Greek : Πέργη Perge , Turkish : Perge ) was an ancient Anatolian city in modern Turkey, once the capital of Pamphylia Secunda , now in Antalya province on the southwestern Mediterranean coast of Turkey . Today, it is a large site of ancient ruins 15 kilometres (9.3 mi) east of Antalya on the coastal plain. An acropolis located there dates back to the Bronze Age . [1]

Perga was an ancient and important city of Pamphylia, between the rivers Catarrhactes and Cestrus (Turkish Aksu Çayı). [2]

A treaty between the Hittite Great King Tudhaliya IV and his vassal, the king of Tarhuntassa , defined the latter's western border at the city "Parha" and the "Kastaraya River". [3] The river is assumed to be the classical Cestrus. West of Parha were the "Lukka Lands". [4] Parha likely spoke a late Luwian dialect like Lycian and that of the neo-Hittite kingdoms.

Ecclesiastical history of the Catholic Church refers to the history of the Catholic Church as an institution, written from a particular perspective. There is a traditional approach to such historiography . The generally identified starting point is Eusebius of Caesarea , and his work Church History .

Since there is no assumption that contemporary historians of the Catholic Church who are also Catholics adopt this perspective, this “traditional approach” is a chapter of historiography, not yet closed, but applying to a definite area that is not central to the academic history of the 20th and 21st centuries.

As well as taking the Church as its subject matter, it is Church-centered, and takes the Church’s teachings at their own estimation:

Perga or Perge ( Greek : Πέργη Perge , Turkish : Perge ) was an ancient Anatolian city in modern Turkey, once the capital of Pamphylia Secunda , now in Antalya province on the southwestern Mediterranean coast of Turkey . Today, it is a large site of ancient ruins 15 kilometres (9.3 mi) east of Antalya on the coastal plain. An acropolis located there dates back to the Bronze Age . [1]

Perga was an ancient and important city of Pamphylia, between the rivers Catarrhactes and Cestrus (Turkish Aksu Çayı). [2]

A treaty between the Hittite Great King Tudhaliya IV and his vassal, the king of Tarhuntassa , defined the latter's western border at the city "Parha" and the "Kastaraya River". [3] The river is assumed to be the classical Cestrus. West of Parha were the "Lukka Lands". [4] Parha likely spoke a late Luwian dialect like Lycian and that of the neo-Hittite kingdoms.

Ecclesiastical history of the Catholic Church refers to the history of the Catholic Church as an institution, written from a particular perspective. There is a traditional approach to such historiography . The generally identified starting point is Eusebius of Caesarea , and his work Church History .

Since there is no assumption that contemporary historians of the Catholic Church who are also Catholics adopt this perspective, this “traditional approach” is a chapter of historiography, not yet closed, but applying to a definite area that is not central to the academic history of the 20th and 21st centuries.

As well as taking the Church as its subject matter, it is Church-centered, and takes the Church’s teachings at their own estimation:

Please help support the mission of New Advent and get the full contents of this website as an instant download. Includes the Catholic Encyclopedia, Church Fathers, Summa, Bible and more — all for only $19.99...

Book I
Book II
Book III
Book IV
Book V
Book VI
Book VII
Book VIII
Book VIII (Appendix) "The Martyrs of Palestine"
Book IX
Book X About this page Source. Translated by Arthur Cushman McGiffert. From Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers, Second Series , Vol. 1. Edited by Philip Schaff and Henry Wace. ( Buffalo, NY: Christian Literature Publishing Co., 1890. ) Revised and edited for New Advent by Kevin Knight. <http://www.newadvent.org/fathers/2501.htm>.

The Ecclesiastical History of the English People ( Latin : Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum ), written by the Venerable Bede in about AD 731, is a history of the Christian Churches in England , and of England generally; its main focus is on the conflict between the pre-Schism Roman Rite and Celtic Christianity . It was originally composed in Latin , is considered to be one of the most important original references on Anglo-Saxon history and has played a key role in the development of an English national identity . It is believed to have been completed in 731 when Bede was approximately 59 years old.

Divided into five books (about 400 pages), the Historia covers the history of England, ecclesiastical and political, from the time of Julius Caesar to the date of its completion (731). The first twenty-one chapters, covering the period before the mission of Augustine , are compiled from earlier writers such as Orosius , Gildas , Prosper of Aquitaine , the letters of Pope Gregory I , and others, with the insertion of legends and traditions.

After AD 596, documentary sources that Bede took pains to obtain throughout England and from Rome are used, as well as oral testimony, which he employed along with critical consideration of its authenticity. This is impressive; nevertheless, the Historia , like other historical writing from this period has a lower degree of objectivity than modern historical writings. It seems to be a mixture of fact, legend and literature. For example, Bede quotes at length some speeches by people who were not his contemporaries and whose speeches do not appear in any other surviving source; it is doubtful whether oral traditional history supported these ostensible quotations.

Perga or Perge ( Greek : Πέργη Perge , Turkish : Perge ) was an ancient Anatolian city in modern Turkey, once the capital of Pamphylia Secunda , now in Antalya province on the southwestern Mediterranean coast of Turkey . Today, it is a large site of ancient ruins 15 kilometres (9.3 mi) east of Antalya on the coastal plain. An acropolis located there dates back to the Bronze Age . [1]

Perga was an ancient and important city of Pamphylia, between the rivers Catarrhactes and Cestrus (Turkish Aksu Çayı). [2]

A treaty between the Hittite Great King Tudhaliya IV and his vassal, the king of Tarhuntassa , defined the latter's western border at the city "Parha" and the "Kastaraya River". [3] The river is assumed to be the classical Cestrus. West of Parha were the "Lukka Lands". [4] Parha likely spoke a late Luwian dialect like Lycian and that of the neo-Hittite kingdoms.

Ecclesiastical history of the Catholic Church refers to the history of the Catholic Church as an institution, written from a particular perspective. There is a traditional approach to such historiography . The generally identified starting point is Eusebius of Caesarea , and his work Church History .

Since there is no assumption that contemporary historians of the Catholic Church who are also Catholics adopt this perspective, this “traditional approach” is a chapter of historiography, not yet closed, but applying to a definite area that is not central to the academic history of the 20th and 21st centuries.

As well as taking the Church as its subject matter, it is Church-centered, and takes the Church’s teachings at their own estimation:

Please help support the mission of New Advent and get the full contents of this website as an instant download. Includes the Catholic Encyclopedia, Church Fathers, Summa, Bible and more — all for only $19.99...

Book I
Book II
Book III
Book IV
Book V
Book VI
Book VII
Book VIII
Book VIII (Appendix) "The Martyrs of Palestine"
Book IX
Book X About this page Source. Translated by Arthur Cushman McGiffert. From Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers, Second Series , Vol. 1. Edited by Philip Schaff and Henry Wace. ( Buffalo, NY: Christian Literature Publishing Co., 1890. ) Revised and edited for New Advent by Kevin Knight. <http://www.newadvent.org/fathers/2501.htm>.


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