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Orion: escape velocity - Conquest of Orion - Escape Velocity Games



Here is your handy-dandy cheat-sheet of rocket engines. Use this as a jumping-off point, there is no way I can keep this up-to-date. Google is your friend!

Although the spacecraft resembles the Apollo spacecraft, Orion will be using state of the art technology for all its systems to create one of the most advanced ...

These are some spacecraft designs that are based on reality. So they appear quite outlandish and undramatic looking. In the next page will appear designs that are ...

175 shares 42

The Orion workers built a series of models, called Put-Puts or Hot Rods, to test whether or not pusher plates made of aluminum could survive the momentary intense temperatures and pressures created by chemical explosives. Several models were destroyed, but a 100-meter flight in November 1959, propelled by six charges, was successful and demonstrated that impulsive flight could be stable (18). These experiments also proved that the plate should be thick in the middle and taper toward its edges for maximum strength with minimum weight (19).

The Orion workers realized early that the U.S. government had to become involved if the project was to have any chance of progressing beyond the tinkering stage. Accordingly, the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA - later DARPA with "D" standing for "Defense") was approached in April1958. In July, it agreed to sponsor the project at an initial funding level of $1 million per year; it was at this time that the code name of Orion was assigned (22). Work proceeded under ARPA order 6, task 3, entitled "Study of Nuclear-Pulse-Propelled Space Vehicles" (23).

What about the cost? Pedersen's 1964 estimate of $1.5 billion for the project (45) suggests the superior economics of nuclear pulse spaceships. Dyson felt that Orion's appeal was greatly diluted by the chemical booster restriction: the Saturns would have represented over 50% of the total cost (46).

Here is your handy-dandy cheat-sheet of rocket engines. Use this as a jumping-off point, there is no way I can keep this up-to-date. Google is your friend!

You can spend lots of time researching spacecraft propulsion systems. But you are in luck, I've got some data for you. Most of this is from Philip Eklund's out of print boardgame Rocket Flight , the impressive Spaceship Handbook , and the indispensable Space Propulsion Analysis and Design . The rest is from various places I found around the internet, and no, I didn't keep track of where I got them. Use at your own risk.

Philip Eklund has a new boardgame out called High Frontier , which has the Atomic Rockets seal of approval (be sure to get the expansion pack as well). It has even more cutting-edge but scientifically accurate propulsion systems, which will eventually find there way onto this web page. (more details here , here , here , and here .)

Here is your handy-dandy cheat-sheet of rocket engines. Use this as a jumping-off point, there is no way I can keep this up-to-date. Google is your friend!

Although the spacecraft resembles the Apollo spacecraft, Orion will be using state of the art technology for all its systems to create one of the most advanced ...

These are some spacecraft designs that are based on reality. So they appear quite outlandish and undramatic looking. In the next page will appear designs that are ...

175 shares 42

The Orion workers built a series of models, called Put-Puts or Hot Rods, to test whether or not pusher plates made of aluminum could survive the momentary intense temperatures and pressures created by chemical explosives. Several models were destroyed, but a 100-meter flight in November 1959, propelled by six charges, was successful and demonstrated that impulsive flight could be stable (18). These experiments also proved that the plate should be thick in the middle and taper toward its edges for maximum strength with minimum weight (19).

The Orion workers realized early that the U.S. government had to become involved if the project was to have any chance of progressing beyond the tinkering stage. Accordingly, the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA - later DARPA with "D" standing for "Defense") was approached in April1958. In July, it agreed to sponsor the project at an initial funding level of $1 million per year; it was at this time that the code name of Orion was assigned (22). Work proceeded under ARPA order 6, task 3, entitled "Study of Nuclear-Pulse-Propelled Space Vehicles" (23).

What about the cost? Pedersen's 1964 estimate of $1.5 billion for the project (45) suggests the superior economics of nuclear pulse spaceships. Dyson felt that Orion's appeal was greatly diluted by the chemical booster restriction: the Saturns would have represented over 50% of the total cost (46).

Here is your handy-dandy cheat-sheet of rocket engines. Use this as a jumping-off point, there is no way I can keep this up-to-date. Google is your friend!

Although the spacecraft resembles the Apollo spacecraft, Orion will be using state of the art technology for all its systems to create one of the most advanced ...

These are some spacecraft designs that are based on reality. So they appear quite outlandish and undramatic looking. In the next page will appear designs that are ...

175 shares 42

Here is your handy-dandy cheat-sheet of rocket engines. Use this as a jumping-off point, there is no way I can keep this up-to-date. Google is your friend!

Although the spacecraft resembles the Apollo spacecraft, Orion will be using state of the art technology for all its systems to create one of the most advanced ...

These are some spacecraft designs that are based on reality. So they appear quite outlandish and undramatic looking. In the next page will appear designs that are ...

175 shares 42

The Orion workers built a series of models, called Put-Puts or Hot Rods, to test whether or not pusher plates made of aluminum could survive the momentary intense temperatures and pressures created by chemical explosives. Several models were destroyed, but a 100-meter flight in November 1959, propelled by six charges, was successful and demonstrated that impulsive flight could be stable (18). These experiments also proved that the plate should be thick in the middle and taper toward its edges for maximum strength with minimum weight (19).

The Orion workers realized early that the U.S. government had to become involved if the project was to have any chance of progressing beyond the tinkering stage. Accordingly, the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA - later DARPA with "D" standing for "Defense") was approached in April1958. In July, it agreed to sponsor the project at an initial funding level of $1 million per year; it was at this time that the code name of Orion was assigned (22). Work proceeded under ARPA order 6, task 3, entitled "Study of Nuclear-Pulse-Propelled Space Vehicles" (23).

What about the cost? Pedersen's 1964 estimate of $1.5 billion for the project (45) suggests the superior economics of nuclear pulse spaceships. Dyson felt that Orion's appeal was greatly diluted by the chemical booster restriction: the Saturns would have represented over 50% of the total cost (46).

Here is your handy-dandy cheat-sheet of rocket engines. Use this as a jumping-off point, there is no way I can keep this up-to-date. Google is your friend!

You can spend lots of time researching spacecraft propulsion systems. But you are in luck, I've got some data for you. Most of this is from Philip Eklund's out of print boardgame Rocket Flight , the impressive Spaceship Handbook , and the indispensable Space Propulsion Analysis and Design . The rest is from various places I found around the internet, and no, I didn't keep track of where I got them. Use at your own risk.

Philip Eklund has a new boardgame out called High Frontier , which has the Atomic Rockets seal of approval (be sure to get the expansion pack as well). It has even more cutting-edge but scientifically accurate propulsion systems, which will eventually find there way onto this web page. (more details here , here , here , and here .)

1k shares 292

Congratulations to @NASA on the flawless Orion flight, as well as to program prime contractors @LockheedMartin and @Boeing !

Here is your handy-dandy cheat-sheet of rocket engines. Use this as a jumping-off point, there is no way I can keep this up-to-date. Google is your friend!

Although the spacecraft resembles the Apollo spacecraft, Orion will be using state of the art technology for all its systems to create one of the most advanced ...

These are some spacecraft designs that are based on reality. So they appear quite outlandish and undramatic looking. In the next page will appear designs that are ...


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