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Epilepsy: a new approach - Epilepsy: A New Approach by Adrienne Richard



If we can take our new method into the clinic, which we hope to do within the next decade, we could treat patients who are susceptible to severe seizures with a one-off injection of the modified virus, and then use CNO only when needed.

If we can take our new method into the clinic, which we hope to do within the next decade, we could treat patients who are susceptible to severe seizures with a one-off injection of the modified virus, and then use CNO only when needed.

Below are the most recent news stories about epilepsy from Epilepsy Research UK and from around the world. You can choose different categories from the side bar on the left (for details of grants made prior to 2012, please visit our research portfolio ). You can also catch up with Epilepsy Research UK's fundraising and research news in our supporter newsletters.

If you wish to receive articles written by Epilepsy Research UK about specially selected research developments, please register for our e-newsletter . This will automatically arrive in your inbox each month.

This is the question that a team of researchers from the Children’s Hospital of Chicago asked themselves. For more than 50% of infants diagnosed with epilepsy  with no known cause, it is important that clinicians know which medication might be most likely to control the condition. Getting it right early would mean better future outcomes for these babies. So researchers read more

About one-third of the 65 million people worldwide affected by epilepsy are treatment-resistant, and the degree to which they suffer from seizures and convulsions can vary widely. Problems occur when nerve cells in the brain fail to communicate properly. A new study has found that inhibiting an enzyme that is critical in metabolic communication has an antiseizure effect in epileptic mice. These findings, the authors believe, may very well initiate a shift to new therapeutic approaches.

Epilepsy and epileptic seizures affect nearly three million Americans and 65 million people of all ages around the world. According to the International League Against Epilepsy, seizures and epilepsy are not the same: “An epileptic seizure is a transient occurrence of signs and/or symptoms due to abnormal excessive or synchronous nerve cell activity in the brain. Epilepsy is a disease characterized by an enduring predisposition to generate epileptic seizures and by the neurobiological, cognitive, psychological, and social consequences of this condition. Translation: a seizure is an event, and epilepsy is the disease involving recurrent unprovoked seizures.”

In fact, “epilepsies” are a group of neurologic disorders. When one or more neural circuits in the brain develop a chronically low seizure threshold, normally innocuous stimuli (external to or within the brain) can trigger a group of nerve cells to fire at once. This abnormal synchronicity is a seizure. 

The Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA) has approved a new generator for the VNS Therapy ® System. The new generator, called AspireSR ® , offers the ability to provide automatic stimulation in response to increased heart rate, in addition to its other stimulation timing. Since heart rate increases are seen prior to many seizures, the ability to provide stimulation at these times provides a way to respond directly at the time of a seizure. “AspireSR ® expands the use of VNS Therapy to a responsive type of stimulation, which is the logical next step in devices for epilepsy,” commented Nathan Foundation, chair of the Epilepsy Foundation's Professional Advisory Board.

The mission of the Epilepsy Foundation is to lead the fight to overcome the challenges of living with epilepsy and to accelerate therapies to stop seizures, find cures, and save lives.

Copyright © 2017. Epilepsy Foundation of America®, d/b/a Epilepsy Foundation®, is a non-profit organization with a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt status. All rights reserved.

If we can take our new method into the clinic, which we hope to do within the next decade, we could treat patients who are susceptible to severe seizures with a one-off injection of the modified virus, and then use CNO only when needed.

Below are the most recent news stories about epilepsy from Epilepsy Research UK and from around the world. You can choose different categories from the side bar on the left (for details of grants made prior to 2012, please visit our research portfolio ). You can also catch up with Epilepsy Research UK's fundraising and research news in our supporter newsletters.

If you wish to receive articles written by Epilepsy Research UK about specially selected research developments, please register for our e-newsletter . This will automatically arrive in your inbox each month.

This is the question that a team of researchers from the Children’s Hospital of Chicago asked themselves. For more than 50% of infants diagnosed with epilepsy  with no known cause, it is important that clinicians know which medication might be most likely to control the condition. Getting it right early would mean better future outcomes for these babies. So researchers read more

About one-third of the 65 million people worldwide affected by epilepsy are treatment-resistant, and the degree to which they suffer from seizures and convulsions can vary widely. Problems occur when nerve cells in the brain fail to communicate properly. A new study has found that inhibiting an enzyme that is critical in metabolic communication has an antiseizure effect in epileptic mice. These findings, the authors believe, may very well initiate a shift to new therapeutic approaches.

Epilepsy and epileptic seizures affect nearly three million Americans and 65 million people of all ages around the world. According to the International League Against Epilepsy, seizures and epilepsy are not the same: “An epileptic seizure is a transient occurrence of signs and/or symptoms due to abnormal excessive or synchronous nerve cell activity in the brain. Epilepsy is a disease characterized by an enduring predisposition to generate epileptic seizures and by the neurobiological, cognitive, psychological, and social consequences of this condition. Translation: a seizure is an event, and epilepsy is the disease involving recurrent unprovoked seizures.”

In fact, “epilepsies” are a group of neurologic disorders. When one or more neural circuits in the brain develop a chronically low seizure threshold, normally innocuous stimuli (external to or within the brain) can trigger a group of nerve cells to fire at once. This abnormal synchronicity is a seizure. 

The Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA) has approved a new generator for the VNS Therapy ® System. The new generator, called AspireSR ® , offers the ability to provide automatic stimulation in response to increased heart rate, in addition to its other stimulation timing. Since heart rate increases are seen prior to many seizures, the ability to provide stimulation at these times provides a way to respond directly at the time of a seizure. “AspireSR ® expands the use of VNS Therapy to a responsive type of stimulation, which is the logical next step in devices for epilepsy,” commented Nathan Foundation, chair of the Epilepsy Foundation's Professional Advisory Board.

The mission of the Epilepsy Foundation is to lead the fight to overcome the challenges of living with epilepsy and to accelerate therapies to stop seizures, find cures, and save lives.

Copyright © 2017. Epilepsy Foundation of America®, d/b/a Epilepsy Foundation®, is a non-profit organization with a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt status. All rights reserved.

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If we can take our new method into the clinic, which we hope to do within the next decade, we could treat patients who are susceptible to severe seizures with a one-off injection of the modified virus, and then use CNO only when needed.

Below are the most recent news stories about epilepsy from Epilepsy Research UK and from around the world. You can choose different categories from the side bar on the left (for details of grants made prior to 2012, please visit our research portfolio ). You can also catch up with Epilepsy Research UK's fundraising and research news in our supporter newsletters.

If you wish to receive articles written by Epilepsy Research UK about specially selected research developments, please register for our e-newsletter . This will automatically arrive in your inbox each month.

This is the question that a team of researchers from the Children’s Hospital of Chicago asked themselves. For more than 50% of infants diagnosed with epilepsy  with no known cause, it is important that clinicians know which medication might be most likely to control the condition. Getting it right early would mean better future outcomes for these babies. So researchers read more

If we can take our new method into the clinic, which we hope to do within the next decade, we could treat patients who are susceptible to severe seizures with a one-off injection of the modified virus, and then use CNO only when needed.

Below are the most recent news stories about epilepsy from Epilepsy Research UK and from around the world. You can choose different categories from the side bar on the left (for details of grants made prior to 2012, please visit our research portfolio ). You can also catch up with Epilepsy Research UK's fundraising and research news in our supporter newsletters.

If you wish to receive articles written by Epilepsy Research UK about specially selected research developments, please register for our e-newsletter . This will automatically arrive in your inbox each month.

This is the question that a team of researchers from the Children’s Hospital of Chicago asked themselves. For more than 50% of infants diagnosed with epilepsy  with no known cause, it is important that clinicians know which medication might be most likely to control the condition. Getting it right early would mean better future outcomes for these babies. So researchers read more

About one-third of the 65 million people worldwide affected by epilepsy are treatment-resistant, and the degree to which they suffer from seizures and convulsions can vary widely. Problems occur when nerve cells in the brain fail to communicate properly. A new study has found that inhibiting an enzyme that is critical in metabolic communication has an antiseizure effect in epileptic mice. These findings, the authors believe, may very well initiate a shift to new therapeutic approaches.

Epilepsy and epileptic seizures affect nearly three million Americans and 65 million people of all ages around the world. According to the International League Against Epilepsy, seizures and epilepsy are not the same: “An epileptic seizure is a transient occurrence of signs and/or symptoms due to abnormal excessive or synchronous nerve cell activity in the brain. Epilepsy is a disease characterized by an enduring predisposition to generate epileptic seizures and by the neurobiological, cognitive, psychological, and social consequences of this condition. Translation: a seizure is an event, and epilepsy is the disease involving recurrent unprovoked seizures.”

In fact, “epilepsies” are a group of neurologic disorders. When one or more neural circuits in the brain develop a chronically low seizure threshold, normally innocuous stimuli (external to or within the brain) can trigger a group of nerve cells to fire at once. This abnormal synchronicity is a seizure. 


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