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Eric bogle, music and the great war: 'an old man's tears' routledge studies in first world war histor - Eric Bogle - Wikipedia



The missing verses and rock arrangement diminish the antiwar message. Glorifying war? No. But sentimentalising it – maybe

A pparently Joss Stone’s version of my song No Man’s Land has polarised opinion. I’ve had quite a large number of emails from irate or upset fans asking me if I’d heard it and why I could allow such a travesty. It’s upset me too, mind you, and irritated me as well.

Here was I in Adelaide , bumbling along in comfortable, crisis-free obscurity at the other end of the world, when suddenly a bushfire flared up back in the increasingly Disunited Kingdom, illuminating a depth of feeling about my song I hadn’t known existed. I usually don’t comment publicly on other artists’ versions of my music, but so many people have been in touch that I felt I should answer some of the questions I have been asked.

Eric Bogle has written many iconic songs that deal with the futility and waste of war. Two of these in particular, ‘And the Band Played Waltzing Matilda’ and ‘No Man’s Land (a.k.a. The Green Fields of France)’, have been recorded numerous times in a dozen or more languages indicating the universality and power of their simple message. Bogle’s other compositions about the First World War give a voice to the voiceless, prominence to the forgotten and personality to the anonymous as they interrogate the human experience, celebrate its spirit and empathise with its suffering.

This book examines Eric Bogle’s songs about the Great War within the geographies and socio-cultural contexts in which they were written and consumed. From Anzac Day in Australia and Turkey to the ‘The Troubles’ in Northern Ireland and from small Aboriginal communities in the Coorong to the influence of prime ministers and rock stars on a world stage, we are urged to contemplate the nature and importance of popular culture in shaping contemporary notions of history and national identity. It is entirely appropriate that we do so through the words of an artist who Melody Maker described as ‘the most important songwriter of our time’.

The missing verses and rock arrangement diminish the antiwar message. Glorifying war? No. But sentimentalising it – maybe

A pparently Joss Stone’s version of my song No Man’s Land has polarised opinion. I’ve had quite a large number of emails from irate or upset fans asking me if I’d heard it and why I could allow such a travesty. It’s upset me too, mind you, and irritated me as well.

Here was I in Adelaide , bumbling along in comfortable, crisis-free obscurity at the other end of the world, when suddenly a bushfire flared up back in the increasingly Disunited Kingdom, illuminating a depth of feeling about my song I hadn’t known existed. I usually don’t comment publicly on other artists’ versions of my music, but so many people have been in touch that I felt I should answer some of the questions I have been asked.

Eric Bogle has written many iconic songs that deal with the futility and waste of war. Two of these in particular, ‘And the Band Played Waltzing Matilda’ and ‘No Man’s Land (a.k.a. The Green Fields of France)’, have been recorded numerous times in a dozen or more languages indicating the universality and power of their simple message. Bogle’s other compositions about the First World War give a voice to the voiceless, prominence to the forgotten and personality to the anonymous as they interrogate the human experience, celebrate its spirit and empathise with its suffering.

This book examines Eric Bogle’s songs about the Great War within the geographies and socio-cultural contexts in which they were written and consumed. From Anzac Day in Australia and Turkey to the ‘The Troubles’ in Northern Ireland and from small Aboriginal communities in the Coorong to the influence of prime ministers and rock stars on a world stage, we are urged to contemplate the nature and importance of popular culture in shaping contemporary notions of history and national identity. It is entirely appropriate that we do so through the words of an artist who Melody Maker described as ‘the most important songwriter of our time’.

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The missing verses and rock arrangement diminish the antiwar message. Glorifying war? No. But sentimentalising it – maybe

A pparently Joss Stone’s version of my song No Man’s Land has polarised opinion. I’ve had quite a large number of emails from irate or upset fans asking me if I’d heard it and why I could allow such a travesty. It’s upset me too, mind you, and irritated me as well.

Here was I in Adelaide , bumbling along in comfortable, crisis-free obscurity at the other end of the world, when suddenly a bushfire flared up back in the increasingly Disunited Kingdom, illuminating a depth of feeling about my song I hadn’t known existed. I usually don’t comment publicly on other artists’ versions of my music, but so many people have been in touch that I felt I should answer some of the questions I have been asked.


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