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Honda cmx250 rebel and cb250 nighthawk twins '85-'14 (haynes service and repair manual) - Honda Rebel 250 Carburetor Parts



This 125 cruiser from the '90s loses out a little bit, mainly because it uses the old 1980s Honda CB125cc twin cylinder motor. If you're short in the leg, or short on cash, then the Honda CA125 Rebel makes an acceptable used bargain, as the build quality is a cut above some other 125 cruisers, but Honda's VT125 Shadow  is miles better.

Most 125cc cruisers have pretty basic suspension and frame technology and the Honda CA125 Rebel is no exception. But apart from a bit of choppiness and a slightly vague feeling at the front end, it commutes just fine. It just lacks the finesse of more modern motorcycles.

The old four valve, twin cylinder engine in the Honda CA125 Rebel dates back to the CB125 of the 1980s - the baby Superdream as it was known back then - and just hasn't got the refinement, or the acceleration of some V-twin powered 125cc cruisers. The engine gets you there eventually, and is frugal on fuel, but overall the Honda CA125 Rebel is hard work.

The Honda CMX250 , or Rebel 250 , is a 234 cc (14.3 cu in) cruiser -style motorcycle made by Honda on and off since 1985. It uses the same 234 cc (14.3 cu in) straight-twin engine as the Honda Nighthawk 250 standard . The Rebel is part of the CM series of cruisers. It is commonly used in the Motorcycle Safety Foundation 's certified rider-training courses. [4]

It has a single disc brake in the front and a drum in the rear. The only gauge is a speedometer that includes gear recommendations based on speed; there is no tachometer. The transmission is a standard down-1st, up-2nd to 5th 5-speed.

The September 1985 issue of Motorcyclist magazine, when the Rebel was first introduced, said, "by targeting the bike to a young audience, such as those who watch MTV, Honda hopes to attract newcomers and expand the motorcycle market ... Honda is not marketing this motorcycle as a woman's bike." [6]

A surprisingly fun bike to ride with a unique look and easy-going nature. It won’t be to everyone’s tastes, but those it appeals to will absolutely love it and for A2-licence holders wanting something a bit different it certainly stands out from the norm.

Tipping the scales at 190kg, the Rebel is pretty light on its wheels at slow speed and has an excellent turning circle, making U-turns a doddle. It’s an easy bike to manoeuvre at walking pace and this, combined with its low seat height, makes it reassuring, easy-going and perfect for less experienced riders. However up the pace and the Rebel really surprises/ Through tight and twisty bends it is an absolute blast, far more competent than it has any right to be and a machine that makes you grin from ear to ear.

The CB500-based engine is what it is and with just 45bhp on tap it is never going to spring any nasty surprises. It’s refined, smooth and has enough grunt to get the Rebel above the national speed limit while remaining extremely versatile in town. The clutch is light, the gearbox a touch clunky but hard to fault in its operation and the throttle response is nice and precise.

This 125 cruiser from the '90s loses out a little bit, mainly because it uses the old 1980s Honda CB125cc twin cylinder motor. If you're short in the leg, or short on cash, then the Honda CA125 Rebel makes an acceptable used bargain, as the build quality is a cut above some other 125 cruisers, but Honda's VT125 Shadow  is miles better.

Most 125cc cruisers have pretty basic suspension and frame technology and the Honda CA125 Rebel is no exception. But apart from a bit of choppiness and a slightly vague feeling at the front end, it commutes just fine. It just lacks the finesse of more modern motorcycles.

The old four valve, twin cylinder engine in the Honda CA125 Rebel dates back to the CB125 of the 1980s - the baby Superdream as it was known back then - and just hasn't got the refinement, or the acceleration of some V-twin powered 125cc cruisers. The engine gets you there eventually, and is frugal on fuel, but overall the Honda CA125 Rebel is hard work.

This 125 cruiser from the '90s loses out a little bit, mainly because it uses the old 1980s Honda CB125cc twin cylinder motor. If you're short in the leg, or short on cash, then the Honda CA125 Rebel makes an acceptable used bargain, as the build quality is a cut above some other 125 cruisers, but Honda's VT125 Shadow  is miles better.

Most 125cc cruisers have pretty basic suspension and frame technology and the Honda CA125 Rebel is no exception. But apart from a bit of choppiness and a slightly vague feeling at the front end, it commutes just fine. It just lacks the finesse of more modern motorcycles.

The old four valve, twin cylinder engine in the Honda CA125 Rebel dates back to the CB125 of the 1980s - the baby Superdream as it was known back then - and just hasn't got the refinement, or the acceleration of some V-twin powered 125cc cruisers. The engine gets you there eventually, and is frugal on fuel, but overall the Honda CA125 Rebel is hard work.

The Honda CMX250 , or Rebel 250 , is a 234 cc (14.3 cu in) cruiser -style motorcycle made by Honda on and off since 1985. It uses the same 234 cc (14.3 cu in) straight-twin engine as the Honda Nighthawk 250 standard . The Rebel is part of the CM series of cruisers. It is commonly used in the Motorcycle Safety Foundation 's certified rider-training courses. [4]

It has a single disc brake in the front and a drum in the rear. The only gauge is a speedometer that includes gear recommendations based on speed; there is no tachometer. The transmission is a standard down-1st, up-2nd to 5th 5-speed.

The September 1985 issue of Motorcyclist magazine, when the Rebel was first introduced, said, "by targeting the bike to a young audience, such as those who watch MTV, Honda hopes to attract newcomers and expand the motorcycle market ... Honda is not marketing this motorcycle as a woman's bike." [6]


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