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Thoughts on the treaty now agitating between government and the east india company: shewing the conce - Ten Thoughts On The Treaty Democratizing The Euro Area (T-DEM)



The Treaty of Versailles was a peace treaty that was primarily written by France, Britain and the United States who won the First World War. In my opinion, the treaty was extremely unfair and biased and was a direct cause of many complications that Germany faced in the years to come. The four main conditions of the treaty impacted Germany both socially and economically and sparked a lot of tension between citizens, politicians and the government.

Not only was Germany not invited to take part in the Paris Peace Conference, they were placed in a situation where they were forced to sign the treaty written at the conference. Because the treaty was written by the countries which were fighting against Germany in the war, the objective of the treaty was to punish Germany.

The second condition described in the treaty was that Germany had to pay for everything that was lost and damaged in the war. The damage totaled approximately thirty million dollars and the third condition of the treaty only made paying for reparations even more unrealistic. Germany was forced to give up its colonies which consequently resulted in an economic downturn because all the profit that was previously generated from the industries in the colonies was lost. Germany had to give up its coalmines to France, which were very prosperous and generated a lot of profit. This left Germany in heavy debt for a long period of time.

[In response to the questions and news articles about about the Douglas Treaties, here are some draft thoughts. There are some citations listed at the end, to which I will add as I can. I will try to add more links, further context, and pare it down. Marc Pinkoski]

Neither party spoke the other’s language, and none of the chiefs would have understood the concept of land as a transferable commodity. It seems more likely they regarded the agreements as temporary measure designed to secure peace until more permanent arrangements could be worked out. Although the text is therefore an uncertain guide to what they thought had occurred, the oral and written guarantees that were made, rather than the blankets, are probably why these documents were signed – and they are properly regarded as treaties. [4]

In his analysis of the colonial law at the time, Foster (1995: 40-41) describes Douglas’ instructions from HBC headquarters in London to discharge Indian title and shows the influence of other colonial problems of the day, saying

The Treaty of Versailles was a peace treaty that was primarily written by France, Britain and the United States who won the First World War. In my opinion, the treaty was extremely unfair and biased and was a direct cause of many complications that Germany faced in the years to come. The four main conditions of the treaty impacted Germany both socially and economically and sparked a lot of tension between citizens, politicians and the government.

Not only was Germany not invited to take part in the Paris Peace Conference, they were placed in a situation where they were forced to sign the treaty written at the conference. Because the treaty was written by the countries which were fighting against Germany in the war, the objective of the treaty was to punish Germany.

The second condition described in the treaty was that Germany had to pay for everything that was lost and damaged in the war. The damage totaled approximately thirty million dollars and the third condition of the treaty only made paying for reparations even more unrealistic. Germany was forced to give up its colonies which consequently resulted in an economic downturn because all the profit that was previously generated from the industries in the colonies was lost. Germany had to give up its coalmines to France, which were very prosperous and generated a lot of profit. This left Germany in heavy debt for a long period of time.


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