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Bowls!: recipes and inspirations for healthful one-dish meals - 25 Super Healthy Bowl Recipes - foodiecrush



Smoothie bowls, breakfast bowls, macro bowls, Buddha bowls, and quinoa bowls have all taken the world by storm—and these trends don't seem to be losing steam anytime soon. And as you'll soon see below, not only are these colorful one-bowl-wonders mesmerizingly eye-catching, but they also serve as an easy-to-make platform to get all the nutrients and energy you need in just one meal.

Each bowl usually contains a varying combination of grains, a rainbow of fruits and vegetables, and either beans or another type of protein. And each trend puts its own spin on its specific contents: For macro bowls, the special addition is fermented foods . For Buddha—or hippie—bowls, it's a tahini sauce. For smoothie bowls, it's a bounty of fruit with countless toppings. So many trends are calling for bowls that one tableware company said their bowl sales increased about 17 percent last year!

The best part is, regardless of which bowl you choose to make, each will be packed with satiating, health-promoting nutrients that aid in weight loss. But just like meals that are served on a plate, not all bowls will help you trim down. And just because the majority of raw and cooked ingredients are "healthy," doesn't mean you should pile them on. Be mindful of these healthy foods you should consume in moderation —including added sugars in smoothie bowls and high-calorie ingredients like nuts, avocados, and oils—and stick to a sensible serving size. Keep reading to get our ultimate list of bowls you can eat for every meal!

Smoothie bowls, breakfast bowls, macro bowls, Buddha bowls, and quinoa bowls have all taken the world by storm—and these trends don't seem to be losing steam anytime soon. And as you'll soon see below, not only are these colorful one-bowl-wonders mesmerizingly eye-catching, but they also serve as an easy-to-make platform to get all the nutrients and energy you need in just one meal.

Each bowl usually contains a varying combination of grains, a rainbow of fruits and vegetables, and either beans or another type of protein. And each trend puts its own spin on its specific contents: For macro bowls, the special addition is fermented foods . For Buddha—or hippie—bowls, it's a tahini sauce. For smoothie bowls, it's a bounty of fruit with countless toppings. So many trends are calling for bowls that one tableware company said their bowl sales increased about 17 percent last year!

The best part is, regardless of which bowl you choose to make, each will be packed with satiating, health-promoting nutrients that aid in weight loss. But just like meals that are served on a plate, not all bowls will help you trim down. And just because the majority of raw and cooked ingredients are "healthy," doesn't mean you should pile them on. Be mindful of these healthy foods you should consume in moderation —including added sugars in smoothie bowls and high-calorie ingredients like nuts, avocados, and oils—and stick to a sensible serving size. Keep reading to get our ultimate list of bowls you can eat for every meal!

There’s a new poke bowl shop in town called Poke Poke , and we’re just a little obsessed. Jack and I have eaten there at least 2x per week since it opened. In fact, as I sit to start writing this post, we’ve just returned from eating lunch there. We might be late to jump on the poke trend, but there’s something so crave-able about these sort of deconstructed sushi bowls. Please tell me that we’re not the only ones that get hooked on the same type of food for weeks on end?

Even though Poke Poke is close to our house, I wanted to make a version at home to share with all of you. Only I didn’t want to use fish because, well, this is a vegetarian blog. Also, I’m not a big fan of sushi-grade grocery store fish. Enter – watermelon. I first saw the idea here  and I was intrigued. While it doesn’t taste like tuna, it sure looks like it. It’s so delicious with this tangy sesame-tamari-lime dressing and all of my favorite poke toppings like pickled ginger, cucumber, furikake (a toasted nori and sesame seed condiment), macadamia nuts and avocado.

Please explain this “poke bowl” phenomenon to a poor expat in rural France, where the choices are French food or French food (not bad choices, but no poke bowls to be found).
What is the poke factor in this recipe?

Smoothie bowls, breakfast bowls, macro bowls, Buddha bowls, and quinoa bowls have all taken the world by storm—and these trends don't seem to be losing steam anytime soon. And as you'll soon see below, not only are these colorful one-bowl-wonders mesmerizingly eye-catching, but they also serve as an easy-to-make platform to get all the nutrients and energy you need in just one meal.

Each bowl usually contains a varying combination of grains, a rainbow of fruits and vegetables, and either beans or another type of protein. And each trend puts its own spin on its specific contents: For macro bowls, the special addition is fermented foods . For Buddha—or hippie—bowls, it's a tahini sauce. For smoothie bowls, it's a bounty of fruit with countless toppings. So many trends are calling for bowls that one tableware company said their bowl sales increased about 17 percent last year!

The best part is, regardless of which bowl you choose to make, each will be packed with satiating, health-promoting nutrients that aid in weight loss. But just like meals that are served on a plate, not all bowls will help you trim down. And just because the majority of raw and cooked ingredients are "healthy," doesn't mean you should pile them on. Be mindful of these healthy foods you should consume in moderation —including added sugars in smoothie bowls and high-calorie ingredients like nuts, avocados, and oils—and stick to a sensible serving size. Keep reading to get our ultimate list of bowls you can eat for every meal!

There’s a new poke bowl shop in town called Poke Poke , and we’re just a little obsessed. Jack and I have eaten there at least 2x per week since it opened. In fact, as I sit to start writing this post, we’ve just returned from eating lunch there. We might be late to jump on the poke trend, but there’s something so crave-able about these sort of deconstructed sushi bowls. Please tell me that we’re not the only ones that get hooked on the same type of food for weeks on end?

Even though Poke Poke is close to our house, I wanted to make a version at home to share with all of you. Only I didn’t want to use fish because, well, this is a vegetarian blog. Also, I’m not a big fan of sushi-grade grocery store fish. Enter – watermelon. I first saw the idea here  and I was intrigued. While it doesn’t taste like tuna, it sure looks like it. It’s so delicious with this tangy sesame-tamari-lime dressing and all of my favorite poke toppings like pickled ginger, cucumber, furikake (a toasted nori and sesame seed condiment), macadamia nuts and avocado.

Please explain this “poke bowl” phenomenon to a poor expat in rural France, where the choices are French food or French food (not bad choices, but no poke bowls to be found).
What is the poke factor in this recipe?

The recent meal-in-a-bowl foodie trend is here to stay. If you love the ease of assembling salads  but are craving something a little heartier, grain bowls are for you. By combining a grain, protein, fresh produce, and nuts or seeds for crunch, these recipes are packed with nutritious ingredients that will keep you feeling full for hours. The best part? They're super-easy to prep ahead of time: You can get a head start on dinner by cooking the grains (quinoa, rice, bulgur wheat, and more) up to three days in advance. Let cool, then place in a container, cover, and refrigerate.

Oatmeal already provides a heart-healthy start to the day, but with the addition of coconut, this dish also offers up a hearty serving of good fats as well.

Ingredients:  Coconut milk, raw cacao powder, maple syrup, salt, old-fashioned oats, unsweetened coconut flakes, sliced almonds, cacao nibs


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