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Mad magazine (1952 series) #293 - Amazon.com: Totally Mad



Jamie Trueblood/AMC As any Mad Man fan knows, Don Draper is truly one of a kind, a man with perfect style and a seemingly infinite number of complexities.

But despite his many distinct traits, fans and critics have spent countless hours over the past seven years trying to figure out which real-life ad men inspired Draper's creation and helped forge his unique personality.

From our research, four candidates have sprung up repeatedly as the advertising executives people think Draper is most likely to be modeled on.

Jamie Trueblood/AMC As any Mad Man fan knows, Don Draper is truly one of a kind, a man with perfect style and a seemingly infinite number of complexities.

But despite his many distinct traits, fans and critics have spent countless hours over the past seven years trying to figure out which real-life ad men inspired Draper's creation and helped forge his unique personality.

From our research, four candidates have sprung up repeatedly as the advertising executives people think Draper is most likely to be modeled on.

In the 1960 spoof ad above, military culture gets a send-up with “Aspire Boot-Lick Polish,” made for “The Man in Command: Pompous… Pig-headed… Pathological.” The flavored boot polish—“licorice, caviar, chocolate, caramel, molasses, borscht, halavah, and Moxie in a base of chicken fat”—is said to make “boot-licking a little more tasty when you gotta do it.” A clever inset links the U.S. chain of command with previous empires, showing a cartoon European naval officer of centuries past getting his boots licked by a subordinate sailor.

Just above, the disturbing 1969 fake ad for “Cemetery Filler Cigarettes” predates the  tobacco trials of the 1990s  by decades. Long promoted for their health benefits, calming effects, sophistication, and taste—as in that memorable first episode of  Mad Men —cigarettes are exposed for the mass killers they are by none other than "Adolph Hitler". (Another 1970 fake ad for “Winsom Cigarettes”  uses an actual cemetery to similar effect .)

All of these fake  Mad  ads come from a  Flickr account compiled by user “Jaspardo.”  See many more of them there, and for even more of the magazine’s illustrious past, check out this Flavorwire gallery of “ The 10 Greatest  Mad Magazine  Covers .”

Jamie Trueblood/AMC As any Mad Man fan knows, Don Draper is truly one of a kind, a man with perfect style and a seemingly infinite number of complexities.

But despite his many distinct traits, fans and critics have spent countless hours over the past seven years trying to figure out which real-life ad men inspired Draper's creation and helped forge his unique personality.

From our research, four candidates have sprung up repeatedly as the advertising executives people think Draper is most likely to be modeled on.

In the 1960 spoof ad above, military culture gets a send-up with “Aspire Boot-Lick Polish,” made for “The Man in Command: Pompous… Pig-headed… Pathological.” The flavored boot polish—“licorice, caviar, chocolate, caramel, molasses, borscht, halavah, and Moxie in a base of chicken fat”—is said to make “boot-licking a little more tasty when you gotta do it.” A clever inset links the U.S. chain of command with previous empires, showing a cartoon European naval officer of centuries past getting his boots licked by a subordinate sailor.

Just above, the disturbing 1969 fake ad for “Cemetery Filler Cigarettes” predates the  tobacco trials of the 1990s  by decades. Long promoted for their health benefits, calming effects, sophistication, and taste—as in that memorable first episode of  Mad Men —cigarettes are exposed for the mass killers they are by none other than "Adolph Hitler". (Another 1970 fake ad for “Winsom Cigarettes”  uses an actual cemetery to similar effect .)

All of these fake  Mad  ads come from a  Flickr account compiled by user “Jaspardo.”  See many more of them there, and for even more of the magazine’s illustrious past, check out this Flavorwire gallery of “ The 10 Greatest  Mad Magazine  Covers .”

1.  Started  by Harvey Kurtzman (editor and contributor) and William Gaines (publisher), MAD Magazine has been corrupting the minds of America’s youth since 1952.  (And as contributor Al Jaffee said in 2010, “from what I’m gathering from the minds of people all over, we succeeded” in that corrupting goal.)

2.  Originally published in a familiar comic book format, MAD switched to its more familiar magazine-size format with issue #24, in 1955.  This had the benefit of removing MAD from the censorship of the Comics Code Authority.  (Not even Superduperman could have successfully fought the CCA.)

3.  MAD was involved in a landmark court case when a group of music publishers sued them over the magazine’s trademark song parodies.  Happily for parodists everywhere, MAD won the case.


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